N.C. Child Health Report Card Gives the State "F" Grade for Child Poverty, But Highlights Other Health Gains | News
News
INDY Week's news blog

Archives | RSS

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

N.C. Child Health Report Card Gives the State "F" Grade for Child Poverty, But Highlights Other Health Gains

Posted by on Wed, Feb 21, 2018 at 11:10 AM

The North Carolina Child Health Report Card, released annually by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine (NCIOM) and NC Child, issued its lastest report today, highlighting troubling disparities for children's health outcomes across racial and socioeconomic lines.

The report card focuses on four key indicators pertaining to children's health: healthy births, access to care, secure homes and neighborhoods, and health risk factors. The study's authors emphasized the state's low marks on housing and poverty, which reflect the high percentage of kids living in poor homes and neighborhoods. That's consequential, the report explains, because poverty affects a wide variety of health outcomes for kids. Just eighty-one percent of children living in low-income houses are in "excellent or very good health," compared to more than ninety-six percent of kids in higher-income households.

click to enlarge screen_shot_2018-02-21_at_10.37.49_am.png

Those disparities manifest across racial lines, as well. According to the report, African-American and Latino children are more than twice as likely to live in poor neighborhoods and homes than white children. That can also affect their health. Children living in poor households have higher rates of childhood asthma and are more likely to be exposed to pollution and allergens. African-American and Latino children are also more likely to live in families with a high housing burden, meaning they spent a large percentage of their income on rent. That can give them less money to spend on insurance coverage and healthy food, both of which can help improve children's health.

As Adam Zolotor, M.D., president and CEO of NCIOM, explained in a press release: “Children’s health is largely determined by factors outside of the doctor’s office; rather, it’s determined by the environments in which children grow, play, and learn. That’s why addressing family financial security is a critical health intervention, and why we must focus on ensuring all children, regardless of race or ethnicity, have the opportunity to grow up in thriving families and communities.” 


The study did show gains in other areas, however, including children's health insurance rates, breastfeeding rates, vaccination rates, and teen births.

The state received an "A" grade for health insurance coverage, with ninety-six percent of children now covered—a record high. The percentage of uninsured children in the state fell more than forty points from 2012 to 2016, and the percentage of parents with insurance has also risen. Still, about 100,000 parents in the state still lack insurance because they fall in the coverage gap, earning too much to qualify for Medicaid but not enough to buy private insurance plans.
click to enlarge screen_shot_2018-02-21_at_10.37.05_am.png
Since 2012, teen births have also fallen more than thirty percent, thanks to more family planning services and sexual education programs, the report says. Additionally, more mothers across the state are breastfeeding, and childhood blood lead levels continue to decline.

click to enlarge screen_shot_2018-02-21_at_11.09.51_am.png


Tags: , , , , ,

Pin It

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in News



Twitter Activity

Comments

You forgot to mention anti-Semitic Deborah Friedman. Remember your talking points.

by Zane Kuseybi on Durham Activists Want the City to Become the First in the U.S. to Condemn Exchanges Between Local Cops and Israeli Security Forces (News)

Unbelievable. No justice for either woman he murdered.

by Urth Creature on No Plans Friday? Michael Peterson is Talking to Dateline NBC (News)

Most Read

Most Recent Comments

You forgot to mention anti-Semitic Deborah Friedman. Remember your talking points.

by Zane Kuseybi on Durham Activists Want the City to Become the First in the U.S. to Condemn Exchanges Between Local Cops and Israeli Security Forces (News)

Unbelievable. No justice for either woman he murdered.

by Urth Creature on No Plans Friday? Michael Peterson is Talking to Dateline NBC (News)

It would be ironic and sad if Durham became the first city in North Carolina to experience the horrors of …

by Allyn Feinstein on Drawing Accusations of Anti-Semitism, Durham City Council Passes Statement on Police Exchanges (News)

If someone receives training like that, you can fully expect them to use it. If that's the kind of city …

by MichaelEdits on Drawing Accusations of Anti-Semitism, Durham City Council Passes Statement on Police Exchanges (News)

Mayor Bill Bell would NEVER have let that such a divisive and unnecessary resolution be considered and harm our City.

by Harris Tweed on Drawing Accusations of Anti-Semitism, Durham City Council Passes Statement on Police Exchanges (News)

© 2018 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation