where's the beef? | Indy Week

where's the beef? 
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Re: “Democracy (and Light Rail) Dies in Darkness

I really hope the NC GA does not back down on this. There is so much more that was promised and could be done with the sales/use taxes the NC GA authorized. This is a giveaway to developers, choice riders and the universities leaving the transit dependent standing in the rain with poor service. Certainly we need better public transit but not at the expense of those that need it. Go back to the drawing board GoTriangle and design a less costly BRT system that serves more people in a less regressive way.

13 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by where's the beef? on 06/06/2018 at 11:37 AM

Re: “Throughout North Carolina, Charter Schools Are Creating Racial Imbalances and Disrupting Public Education. One Durham Charter Wants to Be Part of the Solution.

You have had a contest with reality and you won! Congratulations on making it all about you.

4 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by where's the beef? on 05/25/2018 at 9:09 AM

Re: “Throughout North Carolina, Charter Schools Are Creating Racial Imbalances and Disrupting Public Education. One Durham Charter Wants to Be Part of the Solution.

Terry,

equity
noun
1.the quality of being fair and impartial.

Research has shown unequivocally that emotions degrade critical thinking abilities dramatically. Your responses make my argument for me. Welcome to being part of the problem.

4 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by where's the beef? on 05/24/2018 at 6:10 PM

Re: “As White Students Leave Traditional Public Schools in Orange County, Minorities Are Paying for Charter Schools That Don’t Serve Them

In North Carolina charter schools are held to a different standard than public schools. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but it leaves some room for problems if their financial model does not work. In 2011, the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools ranked North Carolina's charter school law 32 out of 41 states with charter school laws, with poor marks for accountability, equity of funding, and the low cap of 100 schools in the state.

Since 2011 the GA has removed the 100 school cap and strengthened the laws and standards based on a 2016 report: https://www.ncleg.net/documentsites/commit…

As of 2016, there were 158 charter schools, located in 62 school districts and 59 counties, are currently open and serving 81,951 students.

Charter schools are:

not required to provide transportation for students.

not required to provide breakfast or lunch for students.

allowed to serve students from other counties.

may target certain students through admissions set-asides.

allowed to craft a schedule and calendar different from the traditional 180-day school calendar.

have a maximum funded enrollment, if the applications exceed the cap, then students are admitted through a lottery. Once admitted they do not need to reapply though the lottery.

allowed to have non-certified teachers.

allowed to employ teachers on short-term contracts.


Comment: The model is still being refined and the performance standards are still not complete. Choice is good, however a full and thorough parental analysis is important to success.

I agree the article is biased, for example Orange County has a "hold harmless" provision that makes up the funding difference for the county school system. However based on the very poor record of maintenance, having to float a bond for repairs we may see that "hold harmless" has limits.

I do not think there is an appreciable per capita difference between OC schools and Chapel Hill when it comes to discipline problems. I'd like to see the reporters source on that statistic.

3 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by where's the beef? on 05/24/2018 at 3:18 PM

Re: “Throughout North Carolina, Charter Schools Are Creating Racial Imbalances and Disrupting Public Education. One Durham Charter Wants to Be Part of the Solution.

Terry, I am nor "railing" against anything. I am simply stating fact. The point you seem to miss is that its not someone else's idea of equity, everyone has a stake in equity because it is essential to our society. There is an extraordinary transformation taking place in our economy and society and everyone's children will need to deal with it.

It's in our nature to seek things that reflect our status and values. We see and hear what we want to and ignore that which is counter. That serves to divide us.

While we agree the public school system is broken, your overly emotional comments fly in the face of the critical thinking you claim to want for your children. If the best you can do is "contrive" your own children's education then you are leaving your children a legacy of evermore ridged social stratification that will hurt them no matter where they fall in pile.

I am not offering a solution here, only comment. I liken the public schools a bit to health care. From an economic perspective it's a problem of allocation of limited resources among actors. People pretty much agree the best achievable model is universal coverage. The debate is how to get there.

Myself, I was home schooled many years ago, in a place far away when parents had time to gather resources, build a coherent syllabus and spend the necessary time with their children. I think it has served me well, but I do admit to being more candid than others in my responses. Perhaps that's my personality, perhaps I would have been less edgy with more socialization.

I am not sure the level of effort necessary to home school is possible due to time constraints. I am not sure charter schools are the solution, but I agree they are part of it. I do think it is important to acknowledge that charter schools are a social and economic experiment though.

Ask yourself who broke the public education system? How was that accomplished? What do you think the motive was? Do you think the best solution lies in everyone for themselves? Why?

Then ask your children the same questions.

7 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by where's the beef? on 05/24/2018 at 1:40 PM

Re: “Throughout North Carolina, Charter Schools Are Creating Racial Imbalances and Disrupting Public Education. One Durham Charter Wants to Be Part of the Solution.

The comment above illustrates well the dilemma parents and students are in. The choice between a deteriorating status quo and an experimental crap shoot.

The class divide is toxic, and it is nearing the place where it cannot be spanned. Upward mobility has stalled. This inequality entrenches itself through both financial and invidious non-financial forms of wealth and power. The most obvious are an education and a stable, safe family life. The upper class has institutionalized passing wealth and privilege along to their heirs at the expense of other peoples children.

It is entirely possible to get a good education at the many schools that arent in the top tier system. But the bad ones are really are bad for your kids future. I hate to say it, but your children _are_ a social and economic experiment.

2 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by where's the beef? on 05/24/2018 at 8:40 AM

Re: “As White Students Leave Traditional Public Schools in Orange County, Minorities Are Paying for Charter Schools That Don’t Serve Them

From my viewpoint Mr. Crawford has it right, too bad he wasnt elected in the primary.

The delusion of merit creates public school policies that stratify divide and impoverish instead of teaching, uniting and enriching. The truth is public schools are failing because the economics of education has been reduced to a private good; its only justified by future salary and social status. People on the lower end of the Gatsby curve pull their kids from public schools because they are being treated unfairly and they see an economic opportunity. People at the higher end of the Gatsby curve pull their kids from public schools because there is a clear economic advantage and they want to maintain their status. The motive and ability to game the system has become the new test of merit.

The real tragedy is that the parents concerned enough to do this at both ends of the Gatsby curve are the very parents that care to be involved and could potentially fix the public education system. Too bad their kids only get one chance and would have to endure the broken system in the meantime. The child rearing imperative further reduces the public education system to the lowest common denominator.

A genuine education opens minds and creates good citizens and until it does the flight of people who care will continue.

17 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by where's the beef? on 05/23/2018 at 10:49 AM

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