Urban Archaeology: "Is there a Santa Claus?" | Urban Archaeology | Indy Week
Pin It

Urban Archaeology: "Is there a Santa Claus?" 

summerguide_urbanarch_santa.jpg

Alert: spoiler ahead.

In the winter of 1970, I was sitting with several of my fellow students at the yellow duck table, I believe, in Miss Ludwig's afternoon kindergarten class, when the subject of Santa's existence came up. My mother was volunteering that day.

A classmate at the table, whom I can't remember (but his last name probably ended with S, which narrows it down to a kid named Tony, who was a nihilist even at 5, and later may have done time), announced: "There is not a Santa Claus."

Jeri Smith, a petite girl with silky, straight brown hair, her big blue eyes watering with rage and confusion, replied: "There is too a Santa Claus!"

I whispered to my mother, "Is there a Santa Claus?"

Now, my mother has never been one to sugarcoat the truth—she told me, accurately, that I have a terrible singing voice. But she has shown compassion for others: "There is no Santa Claus, but don't tell Jeri."

I remembered this incident last week when I found this in the grass on West Chapel Hill Street, across from the bus station. Let's hope Santa isn't lactose intolerant.

Latest in Urban Archaeology

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Urban Archaeology



Twitter Activity

Comments

I saw the full pamphlet that included this in a laundromat; it is from the Jehovah's witnesses, and it actually …

by RichFNJames on Where we come from (Urban Archaeology)

Wow, how sweet to see this in the Indy!

When Arabella was two years old she said that she …

by Lauren C. K. Goslin on Mrs. Lauren, you are loved (Urban Archaeology)

Most Read

  1. Money Tree (Peripheral Visions)
  2. No Candy Before Dinner (Letters to the Editor)

Most Recent Comments

I saw the full pamphlet that included this in a laundromat; it is from the Jehovah's witnesses, and it actually …

by RichFNJames on Where we come from (Urban Archaeology)

Wow, how sweet to see this in the Indy!

When Arabella was two years old she said that she …

by Lauren C. K. Goslin on Mrs. Lauren, you are loved (Urban Archaeology)

Cute!

by Arthur B Raleigh on Mrs. Lauren, you are loved (Urban Archaeology)

Lisa Sorg is my favorite columnist of all time

by Anthony Corriveau on Fab found fashion (Urban Archaeology)

I love this! What a cool concept for a column, can't wait to read more!

by Adair-Hayes Crane on A note from the Durham County jail (Urban Archaeology)

© 2017 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation