Thousands March for Science in Downtown Raleigh, Say They Will Not Be Silent | Triangulator | Indy Week
Pin It

Thousands March for Science in Downtown Raleigh, Say They Will Not Be Silent 

Kate Schweri, Kestrel McCorkie, Arlene Mendoza-Moran

Megan Howard

Kate Schweri, Kestrel McCorkie, Arlene Mendoza-Moran

Thousands of people rallied in downtown Raleigh Saturday to support the worldwide March for Science, under the slogan "Science, not Silence."

With over six hundred cities participating worldwide, the march demonstrated support for the scientific process—and for the role science should play in policymaking. The marches also arose in protest of President Trump's proposals to slash funding for the Department of Health and Human Services, including nearly $6 billion from the National Institutes of Health, as well his rollbacks of anti-climate-change initiatives.

In Raleigh, people gathered at Shaw University's Estey Hall. Then, with signs that read, "There's no Planet B" and "Science Is the Future," they marched toward Moore Square.

For organizer Ginnie Hench, the March for Science was about scientists standing in solidarity with one another.

"I'm here because people working in agencies that monitor and protect our commonly shared environment are facing a much greater attack," she said. "When we're talking about our air, water, and soil, spaces that defy state lines and national boundaries, we must have a robust and resilient infrastructure where skilled scientists can thrive and take pride in what they do. As well, those who are working in the private sector shouldn't be given gag orders if they want to talk about any of these problems."

Others who spoke at the rally, such as federal scientist Tamara Tal, discussed how budget cuts under the Trump administration might hurt the scientific community.

"There's a reason we have flu vaccines every year and we can combat rapidly evolving public health threats like Zika," she said. "It's called the Centers for Disease Control. There's a reason we have clean air to breathe, safe water to drink, and that there's no longer lead in paint or gasoline. It's called the Environmental Protection Agency. ... So, who are these cuts going to hurt? They're going to hurt federal researchers and scientists like us. In the Research Triangle Park alone, the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences and the Environmental Protection Agency employ over thirty-five hundred workers."

This article appeared in print with the headline "+RALLY FOR REALITY."

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Triangulator



Twitter Activity

Comments

I gained the knowledge how totrade with the help of SuperiorTradingSystem. Just Google them and you'll find them.

by ememmactello on How to Sabotage North Carolina’s Insurance Marketplace in Five Easy Steps (Triangulator)

I'm so glad that I have learned how totrade full time in just 2 weeks. Just Google SuperiorTradingSystem I can …

by ememmactello on Wake County Approves a Twenty-Year Affordable Housing Plan, But Funding Questions Linger (Triangulator)

Most Recent Comments

I gained the knowledge how totrade with the help of SuperiorTradingSystem. Just Google them and you'll find them.

by ememmactello on How to Sabotage North Carolina’s Insurance Marketplace in Five Easy Steps (Triangulator)

I'm so glad that I have learned how totrade full time in just 2 weeks. Just Google SuperiorTradingSystem I can …

by ememmactello on Wake County Approves a Twenty-Year Affordable Housing Plan, But Funding Questions Linger (Triangulator)

Meeting is 11/6 not 11/5.

by Brian Fitzsimmons on As Wake County Considers a New Park in Fuquay-Varina, Other Towns Want Their Fair Share (Triangulator)

@Matt, you do know that the mean average temperature in the world has risen?

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/0…

by Justin Scranton on Endless Summer: Since Fall Started, Raleigh’s Seen Temperatures At Least Six Degrees Above Average Eleven Times (Triangulator)

File this article under "Global Whining" LOL …

by John Trololo on Endless Summer: Since Fall Started, Raleigh’s Seen Temperatures At Least Six Degrees Above Average Eleven Times (Triangulator)

© 2017 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation