Theater review: The Twilight Zone | Theater | Indy Week
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Theater review: The Twilight Zone 

Actors not yet ready for center stage also hampered the briefest show of the week, THE TWILIGHT ZONE, a production that manages to compress three classic episodes of Rod Serling's iconic 1960s series into fewer than 55 minutes on the ArtsCenter stage.

In that period, inexperienced actor Nathan Logan, who was still mastering vocal projection on Saturday night, was thanklessly cast both in William Shatner's role as the superstitious café patron in "Nick of Time" and Robert Redford's enigmatic policeman lead in "Nothing in the Dark."

An assured Amanda Scherle smoothed the rough spots in both episodes. Under Monet Marshall's direction, Drina Dunlap gave the evening's strongest performance as Ada Grant, a gender-flipped interpretation of the convict who keeps being executed in the episode called "Shadow Play."

Laura Arwood was strongest among the supporting roles in a show whose production values in lights, set and audio seemed one step above shoestring.

This article appeared in print with the headline "Lost in translation"

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