The secret behind Weaver Street's miche bread | Food Feature | Indy Week
Pin It

The secret behind Weaver Street's miche bread 

At Weaver Street, try to get the miche while it's warm

Photo by Alex Boerner

At Weaver Street, try to get the miche while it's warm

The Michelin-caliber origami at Chapel Hill's [One] Restaurant is lovely, but the local meal that haunts me is a shepherd's snack: a wedge of Weaver Street Market's miche slathered with a creamy mountain-born cheese.

The bread must be fresh. I recommend arriving at Weaver Street on Tuesday, Thursday, Friday or Sunday at around 5 p.m. to secure an hours-old loaf. As time passes, the bread retains its sour-earthy flavor but loses the crucial contrast between crackly crust and springy crumb.

Miche, a large, round sourdough loaf, is very French. Dark, crusty and dusty with flour, it belongs on a plank table at a village fete. But its old-world aspect has even more to do with its complex texture and flavor. The crust offsets a chewy, medium-dense crumb and subtly acerbic sourdough notes. The monks and peasants of times past were not naïfs, as this reincarnation of their bread makes clear.

The miche pairs well with an equally involved bottle of Saison Dupont, which you can buy across the street at the Carrboro Beverage Company. The classic Belgian import is complex, but not overpowering; relatively light and dry, it adds treble to the miche's profound bass.

click to enlarge PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER
  • Photo by Alex Boerner

Weaver Street's master bakers produce the miche at their vast facility in Hillsborough. The four-pound loaves—140 of them per week—go to Weaver Street's retail locations, where they're sold in quarters ($3.29) and halves ($4.99).

"Most miches don't have as much pre-fermented flour as ours do," says Rob Nichols, Weaver Street's bread production manager. "That's what makes our loaf distinctive and gives it more flavor. And because it's so large, it spends a long time in the oven. In consequence, it develops that beautiful coffee/chocolate-tasting crust."

Too complex to be a mere carb-delivery device, the miche is not meant to accommodate sandwich meat or, God forbid, Nutella. Like good wine or chocolate, it deserves a clean palate. Nonetheless, Nichols has evolved a summer breakfast with miche leftovers.

"We sell something called Ezra's Feta," he says. "It's a cross between feta and cream cheese. I toast a miche slice, douse it with olive oil and spread on this feta. I gather some fresh figs from our fig tree and mash them into the cheese and grind black pepper on top. Eating this with a cup of coffee makes me so happy."

Eat This is a recurring column about great new dishes and drinks in the Triangle. Had something you loved? Email food@indyweek.com.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Food Feature



Twitter Activity

Comments

A great little family Italian restaurant. Good menu. Quiet setting. Good service. …

by Anthony Dean Morgan on Pulcinella's Italian Restaurant (Durham County)

The Refectory is no longer on the Duke Campus. Their new, permanent location is on Chapel Hill Blvd, and yes …

by Beth Owl's Daughter on The Refectory Cafe (Durham County)

Most Read

Most Recent Comments

let's lose the plastic ware

by terryboo on The Tamales and Mezcal at WillCo Embody Mexico City Spirit (Food Feature)

Gasoline stations ("fillin' stations" in the South) used to have people pumping gas. They don't now, except in Oregon and …

by ct on Is Self-Service Beer the Trendy New Normal? (Food Feature)

As part-owner and General Manager of Pour Taproom, I (Dan Enarson) was very disappointed to read Michael Burrows review since …

by Daniel Enarson on Is Self-Service Beer the Trendy New Normal? (Food Feature)

I've taken advantage of the self-pour wall at Clouds in Raleigh. It can be an interesting experience, and if you …

by SomeCallMe...Tim on Is Self-Service Beer the Trendy New Normal? (Food Feature)

What is "ugly" and extremely cruel is animal abuse. Science has shown that fishes are sentient, they suffer fear and …

by MaryF on One Fish, Two Fish, Local Fish, Ugly Fish (Food Feature)

© 2017 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation