The Alcohol Issue | Food Feature | Indy Week
Pin It

The Alcohol Issue 

I had my first sip of beer at age 4. I remember it vividly: On a hot summer night, outside our trailer at a party with my parents and their friends, I took a nip from my dad's can of Stroh's. I thought I had been poisoned. It was—and still is—the worst thing I had ever tasted. (Manischewitz is a close second, followed by Spam.)

But I do like to drink, although since I'm a lightweight, in moderation.

The Alcohol Issue is less a celebration of booze—not that there's anything wrong with that—but more of a collection of stories and graphics that we think are interesting.

Vernal Coleman reports on Durham's efforts to regulate liquor permits, particularly those held by convenience stores and mini-marts. He and intern Maggie Spini compiled several years' worth of data documenting crimes reported within 500 feet of stores located in some of the city's highest-poverty areas. While it's difficult to verify that these stores' sales of wine and beer cause crime, they aren't curbing it, either. Prostitution, drugs, weapons and robberies are common near these locations, damaging neighborhood residents' quality of life.

We also look at the lighter side of liquor. D.L. Anderson gives us a peek at one of the state's most famous moonshiners, Percy Flowers. Emily Wallace illustrates the tools and sayings of a successful moonshine operation. Billy Ball offers a guide to the state's moonshine laws. Maggie Spini introduces us to two (legal) distilleries that are slated to open in the Triangle, one in Chapel Hill and the other in Durham.

If brown ale rather than white lightning is more your speed, I examine the viability of North Carolina's hops industry by speaking with N.C. State University researchers, local brewers and one of the world's foremost authorities on hops, who happens to live in Wake Forest.

We advise you to drink responsibly. That admonition is not only to free us from litigation, but also to remind you that 1) your liver is a finite resource, and 2) drunks are boring.

Now, a toast to moderation: Cheers!

This article appeared in print with the headline "It's happy hour."

Comments (4)

Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-4 of 4

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Food Feature



Twitter Activity

Comments

A great little family Italian restaurant. Good menu. Quiet setting. Good service. …

by Anthony Dean Morgan on Pulcinella's Italian Restaurant (Durham County)

The Refectory is no longer on the Duke Campus. Their new, permanent location is on Chapel Hill Blvd, and yes …

by Beth Owl's Daughter on The Refectory Cafe (Durham County)

Most Read

Most Recent Comments

@Jooolie That's a fair comment and an initial concern of mine. I attended their soft opening though, and they operated …

by Karla Jimenez on Cocoa Cinnamon’s Third Shop Will Be Mindful of the Longstanding Latino Community in a Changing Lakewood (Food Feature)

That's all lovely, and I will likely visit, but... I am concerned about whether the established Latino and Black community …

by Jooolie on Cocoa Cinnamon’s Third Shop Will Be Mindful of the Longstanding Latino Community in a Changing Lakewood (Food Feature)

It's impossible to decide what's worse with this guy, the opinions or the writing. Well, congrats at least on getting …

by Van Buren Boy on How One Local Server Learned to Stop Worrying About Bird Poop and Embrace Patio Dining (Food Feature)

You forgot to mention Treforni in Durham as one of the more noteworthy independent pizzerias in the area. …

by Shocka Kahn on Pizzeria Faulisi Masters Family Style With Adept Culinary Skill (Food Feature)

Querido Senor Vasquez, Por favor specify YOUR specific Latino country and culture so that we may be assured you only …

by Trizia on Chicken Bridge Bakery Feeds Bodies and Minds with Baked-In Messages of Resistance and Solidarity (Food Feature)

© 2017 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation