reneecagninahaynes | Indy Week

reneecagninahaynes 
Member since Aug 10, 2012

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Renee Cagnina Haynes is the exhibitions and publications manager with the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Photo: Duke Photography.

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Re: “Why are negotiations between a developer and Durham Central Park being held behind closed doors?

It would seem to me that this article should have been given a completely different headline. The issue isn't Durham Central Park, it's the developer's overall concept and the lack of trust we residents have in the City to force developers to do more than just “plop” architecture (Natalie, I agreed with you but it seems as though your comment was deleted along with mine). To imply that Durham Central Park is the villain here goes to show that this reporter rushed to release a story – so they could claim they did it first, perhaps – and really all the article has proven is that their story is under informed and over sensationalized.

I'm glad there's an organization like DCP who's protecting and providing green space (something that’s becoming increasingly limited in downtown) and a number of amenities (like the pavilion for the farmers' market, Mount Merrill, etc.) for public use in downtown Durham. We all saw what happened with Preservation Durham and East West Partners. Thankfully that hasn't happened here, because that whole Liberty debacle was a mess. It blew up and in the end PD was removed from the conversation.

Developers don’t have to work with the public or local nonprofits like DCP. They could just go straight to the city and continue the current “plop” architecture trend that we’re seeing around the city. I’m glad DCP is at the table. If not, who else would be?

3 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by reneecagninahaynes on 06/11/2015 at 10:47 PM

Re: “

It would seem to me that this article should have been given a completely different title. The issue isn't Durham Central Park, it's the developer's overall concept and the lack of trust we resident’s have in the City to force developers to do more than just “plop” architecture (Natalie, I agree with what you mention above). To imply that Durham Central Park is the villain here goes to show that this reporter rushed to release a story – so they could claim they did it first – and really all the article has only proven is that their story is under informed and over sensationalized.

I'm glad there's an organization like DCP who's protecting and providing green space (something that’s becoming increasingly limited in downtown) and a number of amenities (like the pavilion for the farmers' market, Mount Merrill, etc.) for public use in downtown Durham. We all saw what happened with Preservation Durham and East West Partners. Thankfully that hasn't happened here, because that whole Liberty debacle was a mess. It blew up and in the end PD was removed from the conversation.

Developers don’t have to work with the public or local nonprofits like DCP. They could just go straight to the city and continue the current “plop” architecture trend that we’re seeing around the city. I’m glad DCP is at the table. If not, who else would be?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by reneecagninahaynes on 06/10/2015 at 10:29 AM

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