On the Ark | Food Feature | Indy Week
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On the Ark 

The American Livestock Breeds Conservancy researches the fortunes of traditional livestock breeds. They identified a number of turkey breeds as either rare (less than 1,000 remaining) or critical (less than 500) and worthy of saving. This fit nicely with the program of the Ark project of Slow Food USA.

Slow Food's Ark project supports high-quality, small-scale food production and helps the small producer develop markets while protecting endangered foods from industrial-agricultural standardization. It protects biodiversity in our food supply and promotes sustainable agriculture. And finally, in line with Slow Food's manifesto, it champions the art of taste and the right to pleasure. So products worthy of the Ark must be traditional, endangered and taste good.

There are other small farms out there, working hard to bring heritage turkeys back to commercial life. Some in Kansas and New York as well as Oklahoma, Maine, Vermont, Virginia, Wisconsin, Illinois, Oregon and Tennessee.

For more information, check these sites on the Web: www.slowfoodusa.org, www.fao.org, www.albc-usa.org, www.grif fin.peachnet.edu/sare/otr/ontheroad.html

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