Number of homeless in Durham increased in past year | Durham County | Indy Week
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Number of homeless in Durham increased in past year 

On a late January evening, despite heavy rains and fierce winds, at least 759 people in Durham had no place to call home.

The figure was announced last week as a result of the Point-In-Time Count, an annual one-night tally of the homeless.

On Jan. 30, 2013, Durham County officials collaborated with 13 local shelters and organizations and about 50 community volunteers to count the unsheltered population—those in cars, on the streets or in the woods—as well as those staying in transitional housing and emergency shelters.

Of the 759 homeless counted that evening, 118 were children. Fifty-three were unsheltered—7 percent of the overall count, lower than the national average of 38 percent. Nearly 300 have chronic substance abuse issues, 126 struggle with severe mental illness, and 100 were victims of domestic violence, according to the report by Durham's Community Development Department. [See our Triangulator blog for more stats.]

Bo Glenn, Homeless Services Advisory Committee chairman, suspects that many homeless are unaccounted for. "It doesn't count those sleeping on someone's couch, those staying with family or friends, in an unheated garage, or in the woods so deep we can't find them. It doesn't count the people who are in jail, or those who have to decide between rent, heat, medicine and food."

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) requires communities to participate in the count in order to receive federal stimulus dollars. Durham has participated since 1999, dispatching volunteers one night per year to canvass the streets. They report the numbers to HUD, which analyzes the results and provides feedback on which programs are working and which need adjustment.

"For most people it takes just a little bit of help. A little bit can stop the downward spiral," said Glenn.

Among local programs offering that assistance, Housing for New Hope's Rapid Re-Housing Program has helped hundreds of people move from the streets to their own apartments or houses. The program also provides ongoing support, helping families and individuals negotiate security deposits and lease agreements, evaluate their budgets and change spending habits so they are able to save money.

"We're creating a new reality for these people," said Melissa Hartzell, Housing for New Hope development director.

Rapid Re-Housing has a 91 percent retention rate, says Hartzell, meaning most relocated families have stayed in their homes.

While programs like Rapid Re-Housing show promising results, many still struggle to keep up with rent.

This year's count is 8 percent higher than in 2012. Asked to estimate next year's count, city officials looked grave. "We are certainly concerned about the numbers going up," said Glenn. "It's going to be harder. It's going to require efforts from all of us."

The Legislature's decisions to cut unemployment benefits, roll back Medicaid and increase sales taxes will further hurt the poor, Glenn says. "We cannot exist with the state Legislature doing what it's doing without the numbers going up."

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