Judy Tysmans | Indy Week

Judy Tysmans 
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Re: “Dumping on New Hill

Cary only evaluated one site--the fourth on the priority list in terms of their own engineers' evaluation--totally ignoring any evaluation of the first three sites--on PE land, a mile and more away from the population center. That one fact alone would eliminate most of the listed issues that have been so carefully evaluated: "groundwater, wetlands, farmlands, wildlife, air quality, odor, noise, traffic, light spill, hazardous substances, global climate change, archaeological and historic properties, property values, low-income and minority communities, and safety." Of the 16 items listed here, 11 would not have needed to be evaluated in such detail and at such cost simply by moving the location to one of the 3 PE sites a mile away, chosen as high priority locations by professional engineers.

Anyone walking the large, low-lying area of the Seymour farm will note grape vines climbing through trees making an upper story like in a tropical jungle, the ground scoured by water from rain, and roots extending from those vines overhead, dangling down to the ground like a veil. This is an amazing and huge wetland area, and surely very unique. I've never seen anything like it. I don't know of any wildlife study that has been done in there--it would be fascinating to know what lives there before it's destroyed.

Also I note a missing fact: when are New Hill people going to get water and sewage hook-ups? And at what cost? I think that was to be in 10-15 years, after annexation.

If 200 ft. of forest were adequate to contain "light, odor, traffic and noise," why would Cary pump its sewage 17 miles to move it away from their own citizens? This is an enormous cost. If only "200 feet of forest [which] stands forever" were adequate, there would be no reason for Cary to spend the multi-millions of dollars required to place that plant very far away from their own residents whose taxes are paying those millions.

There is also a sludge incinerator planned for that location, to burn the treated sewage in New Hill, where the smoke, particulate matter, and heavy metals will rain down on the near-by residents, as well as those some distance away.

JT, about a mile away as the crow flies...

Posted by Judy Tysmans on 09/09/2010 at 10:41 PM

Re: “Re: Cary mayor responds to Western Wake Partners wastewater project location

Cary Mayor, Harold Weinbrecht's, letter is so deceptive. Cary ONLY evaluated ONE site--the FOURTH on the priority list in terms of their own engineers' evaluation--totally ignoring any evaluation AT ALL of the first three sites--on PE land, a mile and more away from the population center. That one fact alone would eliminate most of the issues he lists that they have so carefully evaluated: "groundwater, wetlands, farmlands, wildlife, air quality, odor, noise, traffic, light spill, hazardous substances, global climate change, archaeological and historic properties, property values, low-income and minority communities, and safety." Of the 16 items listed here, ELEVEN would not have needed to be evaluated in such detail and at such cost simply by moving the location to one of the PE sites chosen as high priority by professional engineers. Even a school child could see the disadvantage of locating the plant in a location with ELEVEN high risks, when moving it a mile or more away would eliminate all of these, leaving only five more global issues to deal with---like global climate change... (I wonder how he planned to fix that one?)

Anyone walking the large, low-lying area of the Seymour farm will note grape vines climbing through trees making an upper story like in a tropical jungle, the ground scoured by water from rain, and roots extending from those vines overhead, dangling down to the ground like a veil. This is an amazing and huge wetland area, and surely very unique. I've never seen anything like it. I don't know of any wildlife study that has been done in there--it would be fascinating to know what lives there before it's destroyed.

Also I note a small defecit: WHEN exactly are New Hill people going to get water and sewage hook-ups? And at what cost?

WHEN did public health employees come and evaluate the sewage systems and well water from residents all around the plant who will be effected? This must not have been noticed by hundreds of people living in New Hill. I can't imagine how they missed this action. Would PH not have been required to get residents' permission to test their water?

I believe the mayor's "unfair and incomplete" more accurately describes his own statements, than New Hill's, which are factual. Every statement from New Hill's representatives in that article can be backed up by meeting notes from the various "Partner" towns, DENR reports, and documents from Cary in their own emails.

If 200 ft. of forest were adequate to contain "light, odor, traffic and noise," why would Cary pump its sewage 17 miles to move it away from their own citizens?? This is an enormous cost. If only "200 feet of forest [which] stands forever" were adequate, there would be no reason on earth for Cary to spend the multi-millions of dollars required to place that plant very far away from their own residents whose taxes are paying those millions.

And where is the mayor's mention of the huge sludge incinerator which is also planned for that location, in New Hill, where the smoke, particulate matter, and heavy metals will rain down on the near-by residents, as well as those some distance away, as the wind blows this air-borne effluent from the plant?

I believe the mayor has omitted facts in preference for schmaltz, hoping no one can read between his lines and insert facts, and wonder how he can stand so firmly on such a shifty base of propaganda.

Judy Tysmans--1 1/2 mi., as the smoke drifts, from that plant's proposed location

Posted by Judy Tysmans on 08/27/2010 at 2:17 PM

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