Indies Arts Awards 2015 | Arts Feature | Indy Week
Pin It

Indies Arts Awards 2015 

Cecily Mitchell (left), Chris Tonelli (middle) and Greg Lowenhagen (right)

Photos by Alex Boerner

Cecily Mitchell (left), Chris Tonelli (middle) and Greg Lowenhagen (right)

The INDY had existed for less than a decade when, in 1990, the young newspaper paused to honor community artists. That year, the INDY named 16 professors, sponsors, spaces, bands, impresarios and organizations as its inaugural "Indies Arts Awards" winners. Some of those recipients are still active—Alice Gerrard was nominated for her first Grammy last year—while others, like the author Reynolds Price, have passed away.

Yet the INDY has maintained the tradition for a quarter-century now. The numbers have fluctuated over the years. (As if the editors had exhausted most of their early ideas for round one, there were but five winners in 1991.) And so has the answer to the unending question of who deserves the recognition most: individual artists doing compelling work or the architects of systems that allow for that work to thrive.

This year, for the 26th annual Indies Arts Awards, the latter prevailed. The six people selected for this year's prize have changed the very landscape of arts in the Triangle by building new establishments in which makers, doers and thinkers can matter even more. With her rock club and community space The Pinhook, Kym Register has mustered a platform for the arts in much the same way as Chris Tonelli has done with his poetry readings, press and bookstore and Dasan Ahanu (a rare repeat Indies winner) has with his spoken-word performances and writing workshops. At UNC, Emil Kang has built a world-class performing arts series that offers area audiences exposure to masters we might otherwise watch only on YouTube. And with their respective music festivals, Greg Lowenhagen and Cicely Mitchell have helped reshape the way Raleigh and Durham can be perceived as complex, viable entertainment venues.

In fact, in some capacity, all of this year's Indies recipients have done just that: conceptually altered a physical landscape we thought we knew in order to make a more robust arts scene.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Arts Feature



Twitter Activity

Comments

For five years in the mid 70s my family lived in an area about 1/3 mile from where the couple …

by Homeward on In The Long Dance, Two Journalists Reporting on a Cold Murder Case in Durham Become Podcasters Participating in an Investigation (Arts Feature)

I was only there from the very beginning through the first couple of years I guess, but watching the Carrack …

by $#jw on An Old Tobacco Complex Turned Arts Hub Evolves as the Carrack Appoints a New Leader and SPECTRE Arts Closes (Arts Feature)

Most Recent Comments

For five years in the mid 70s my family lived in an area about 1/3 mile from where the couple …

by Homeward on In The Long Dance, Two Journalists Reporting on a Cold Murder Case in Durham Become Podcasters Participating in an Investigation (Arts Feature)

I was only there from the very beginning through the first couple of years I guess, but watching the Carrack …

by $#jw on An Old Tobacco Complex Turned Arts Hub Evolves as the Carrack Appoints a New Leader and SPECTRE Arts Closes (Arts Feature)

Celeste ISD in Celeste, Tx. We are Blue Devils for life in this small Texas town. I was the high …

by Brandon Lamm on How a Blue Devil Statue that Was Raising Hell in Small-Town Mississippi Escaped, After a Brief Abduction, to Durham (Arts Feature)

Poultney High School in Poultney VT also has the Blue Devils as their mascot.

by jcevarts on How a Blue Devil Statue that Was Raising Hell in Small-Town Mississippi Escaped, After a Brief Abduction, to Durham (Arts Feature)

Many thanks for the review, Chris Vitiello. There are two things I would like to clarify as the exhibition curator. …

by L Turner on In Versus, This Year's Crop of UNC Studio Art MFA Graduates Take a Long View of Immediate Crises (Arts Feature)

© 2018 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation