Eat it up: The 15 stories and trends that defined the Triangle's food scene in 2015 | Food Feature | Indy Week
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Eat it up: The 15 stories and trends that defined the Triangle's food scene in 2015 

At Death & Taxes, and several other Triangle restaurants, big grills and big fires were ... hot?

Photo by Jillian Clark

At Death & Taxes, and several other Triangle restaurants, big grills and big fires were ... hot?

The Triangle's food community continues to thrive and expand, as does its national acclaim. New spots seem to open every week, from pricey downtown digs to cheap strip mall eateries. National lists continue to broadcast the hottest spots in the area, while features in The New York Times and the like consistently regard the area with the glee of a naïve discoverer.

This growth, of course, brings glorious new spots, failed old favorites and curious scenarios that make us say things like, "Well, why would you name your restaurant that in the first place?" In 2015, these 15 stories fed, frustrated, delighted and disappointed us around the table.

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