Clyde Edgerton, Painter? A Noted North Carolina Novelist Gets Visual with Photographer John Rosenthal. | Visual Art | Indy Week
Pin It

Clyde Edgerton, Painter? A Noted North Carolina Novelist Gets Visual with Photographer John Rosenthal. 

Page 2 of 2

Rosenthal was a fan before he was a friend. As the host of a TV show called Portfolio, he had Edgerton on as a guest in 1985 to promote his first book, Raney.

"Clyde is very loyal to his place," he says. "He doesn't try to invent a landscape, because he has one. It's very seriously embedded in his consciousness, and exploring that landscape has been his career."

Edgerton says Rosenthal's interest has been crucial. Over the years, first by letter, then by email, Rosenthal continued to provide feedback. "He's got a knack for pointing out things that either I'd forgotten or I was hoping someone would read and appreciate," says Edgerton.

 Rosenthal's work ranges from stunning images of menacing ocean waves to enigmatic moment shots in the spirit of Cartier-Bresson to priceless views of New York in the seventies. One standout in this show was taken at MOMA and includes Warhol's "Double Elvis," anchored by the distant figure of a woman who chanced to pause at a window overlooking West 53rd Street.

"To me it's just fascinating to look at people in museums," Rosenthal says. "Think of the painting as a window. You look at a Turner painting of Venice, you're stepping into commerce in 1830. If you look at a Pollack, you're going into an argument that happened in the 1950s."  

This is not Edgerton's first rodeo. Four years ago, he exhibited fifteen "rather small" paintings in a show with Louis Rubin, his editor at Algonquin and a watercolorist by hobby. To his delight, almost everything sold.

"I didn't have sense to know that if you're among your very best friends, a lot of them are going to buy your art to keep from being embarrassed, especially if it's not too highly priced," he says. Still, he was encouraged, even a bit thrilled. He's kept at it since then. Lately he's begun to go deeper.

"I'll do a painting and it will turn out pretty bad, and I don't know why, and I'll do another one and it turns out, in my view, pretty good, and I don't know why," Edgerton says. "But I'm beginning to learn why."

This article appeared in print with the headline "Clyde Edgerton, Painter?"

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Visual Art



Twitter Activity

Comments

This is very cool and I need to check it out.

I just came back from a Route 66 …

by JeffDeWitt on Neon Artist Nate Sheaffer Fills a Corner of Dix Park with Light You Can Hear and Sound You Can See (Visual Art)

By reading this article we can understand the value of technology, as the technology is using for the purpose of …

by iphonesupport on NCMA’s Half-Century Wait for the Right Technology to Restore a Mangled Ancient Statue Comes to an End (Visual Art)

Most Recent Comments

This is very cool and I need to check it out.

I just came back from a Route 66 …

by JeffDeWitt on Neon Artist Nate Sheaffer Fills a Corner of Dix Park with Light You Can Hear and Sound You Can See (Visual Art)

By reading this article we can understand the value of technology, as the technology is using for the purpose of …

by iphonesupport on NCMA’s Half-Century Wait for the Right Technology to Restore a Mangled Ancient Statue Comes to an End (Visual Art)

Great article! Good luck DAM!

by J.P. McPickleshitter on In The Carrack’s Former Digs, Durham Artists Movement Creates a Safe Space for Diverse Voices (Visual Art)

We have a well-equipped infrastructure which is supported by technologically advanced machines and tools that allow us to offer latest …

by Sumit Chaudhary on Chris Bradley finds creative opportunities in the simplest of objects in Close One at CAM Raleigh (Visual Art)

I believe one of the artists mentioned is actually Sally Van Gorder, not Gordon.

by MH on A novel agreement between a landlord and artists gives Raleigh a new art space (Visual Art)

© 2018 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation