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Re: “Poisoning our pets

I always understood 5% was safe and not to use 10% Carbaryl.

Posted by Renée H. on 07/16/2017 at 7:09 AM

Re: “The Misogyny Behind the Unraveling of DSI Comedy

Thankfully our community is also home to the very talented and funny women of the Eyes Up Here comedy troupe. Keep your eyes out (and up) for future shows!

5 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Kristin Lione on 07/16/2017 at 12:47 AM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

The construction site is an absolute eyesore. I've never seen such a mess. I have looked to see who the builder is. There's no sign. It appears he's embarrassed by the horrible mess he's created in a once beautiful lot.

If you haven't seen this, drive by. Approach from the East (up the hill). I think it's the "scariest" example of infill in this city.

DISGUSTING!

13 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Bobbi H on 07/16/2017 at 12:09 AM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

I've personally seen Raleigh's lax code enforcement for infill with shady developers not even getting a slap on the wrist for skipping multiple permits for new construction -- even after a critical structural failure. The real problem here is the interpretations used by the board of adjustment. Perhaps most pertinent is the board's apparent (not sure if it's codified anywhere) policy to NOT penalize a developer for causing the "hardship" when they are the same ones who have bulldozed the smaller, older houses which were perfectly fine buildings and easily modernized. These smaller, older houses are being bulldozed then the developer turns around and says he can't build on the lot because it's too small? What a joke of a policy. Yuck.

19 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by citizenshame on 07/15/2017 at 3:43 PM

Re: “DSI Comedy Will Close August 28, Zach Ward Says

That's some biased journalism Indyweek.

1 like, 3 dislikes
Posted by UNCgradresponse on 07/15/2017 at 3:22 PM

Re: “What life is like in solitary confinement at North Carolina's Central Prison

Let's imagine these Icon prisoners that do have stimuli; being cuffed to the rear with handcuffs too tight,
summer heat waves, freezing winters, no air circulation. A lot of people have described it as being locked
up in a coffin. They are right. Now do you see why it is torture pure and simple?

Honestly even minimum security prisons here are just concentration camps in disguise. They might
as well euthanize prisoners.

Posted by John Wong on 07/15/2017 at 2:44 PM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

The Better Business Bureau has given Northstar a B- (https://www.bbb.org/raleigh-durham/business-reviews/real-estate-developers/northstar-development-group-in-raleigh-nc-90283373) and there are several negative comments on its FB page. I drive by Ms. Glover's property on a regular basis, and it's a shame that the builder was allowed to build as close and as high as it has done. Shame on them, and shame on the City of Raleigh!

17 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Kelley Griner Chisholm on 07/15/2017 at 2:18 PM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

Mrs. Glover needs to sue the builder and the city. The audacity of the developer to respond that the variance was required to reasonably use the lot is absurd. Build a smaller footprint. Havent househunters and developers gotten the message that "huge" has fallen out of trend? We clearly need a new council that will stop cowtowing to developers.

20 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Kathy Epperson on 07/15/2017 at 11:36 AM

Re: “Capitol Broadcasting Wants Community Input on Its American Tobacco Campus Expansion. By God We're Going to Give It to Them.

I want to acknowledge how lucky Durham is to have such incredible leaders in the community as provided by the Goodmon family.

Posted by duh on 07/15/2017 at 10:05 AM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

It is apparent that Raleigh City Goverment is not enforcing residential zoning laws properly, or fairly.
The plan for a house this size, and built so close to an existing structure , should have never been approved, much less given further variances. They have encroached on the existing home owner's structure. The Glover's should sue for emotional distress.
Stop pandering to the Contractors and Carpet Baggers!

27 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Sandi 1 on 07/15/2017 at 9:35 AM

Re: “McFarlane’s Attempt to Overhaul CACs Might Be a Big Issue in Raleigh’s Mayor’s Race

It's well and good for elected officials to state support for CACs after they voted May 2 to approve a report with recommendations that include the eventual eradication of CACs (as the article reports). Since May 2, there's been quite a bit of verbal gymnastics -- committing that CACs will be part of the proposed two-year process on citizen engagement, for example. Well, that's not a commitment that CACs will remain a critical component of citizen engagement at the end of the day, when this process concludes.

It would be a simple matter for Council to begin repairing the self-inflicted damage of May 2. That is by voting on August 15 to set aside the task force recommendations which include: "The complete system of CECs is intended to be a second generation of the CAC system in place currently" The full report can be downloaded at the city's web site here: http://www.raleighnc.gov/content/CorNews/D… The above quoted statement appears on the bottom of page 3.

Council members can either continue to issue flowery but ultimately meaningless statements of support of CACs, or they take an affirmative stand once and for all. How about it? The next council meeting is one month from today on August 15. Council has an opportunity to clear the confusion and uncertainty following the May 2 vote, and should demonstrate leadership we've yet to see on this important issue. Whatever the position, let's hear it: Do members favor the proposed government-directed Citizen Engagement Board that oversees Citizen Engagement Councils, or citizen-led CACs? It's not a difficult question.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by George Farthing on 07/15/2017 at 8:31 AM

Re: “Raleigh Mayoral Candidate Charles Francis Calls Mayor McFarlane 'Aloof, Disengaged'

https://twitter.com/WhalerCane/status/8845…

Perry, it's July 15. On July 10, you indicated via the above tweet that you would reply on whether council will vote Aug. 15 to set aside the May 2 vote as regards the task force recommendations on CACs. Specifically, Councilor Stephenson's written statement at the July 5 council meeting that reads, "...set aside elements of the May 2nd vote that conflict with the Mayor's other June 6th statement that 'every member of this City Council understands and values the important role the CACs have had and continue to play in citizen engagement.'"

On June 6 the mayor made a statement of support for CACs. On July 5 Councilor Stephenson presented a statement in support of CACs. This week you committed that CACs "are absolutely to be included" in the citizen engagement process.

Citizens understandably are weary of words, however affirming they may sound. We want a commitment that CACs will not only be part of the two-year process as you've stated but that there's assurance that CACs will remain a critical component of citizen engagement FOLLOWING this process (unlike the task force recommendations). I hope the August 15 City Council meeting doesn't include just another conciliatory statement with no real meaning or commitment. After all this time, words no longer suffice. It's time for leadership.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by George Farthing on 07/15/2017 at 7:39 AM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

Unfortunately this is occurring all around Raleigh and especially inside the Beltline where older, smaller homes are being torn down and replaced with taller, much larger homes. The Roanoke Park area of Five Points has examples on almost every block. The new UDO (zoning code) facilitated this by reducing the setback requirements, reducing the amount of space required in front , sides and back of the house on the lot.

28 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Carole Meyre on 07/15/2017 at 1:24 AM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

Unfortunately this article did not include photos of the Glover home following a heavy rainfall. I saw photos and their backyard was a virtual pond. Muddy water was pouring into the yard, down the driveway, and into the street. Why were exceptions made to the height and setback ordinance? Not every inch of infill has to be maximized for "profit". Abominable decision making, development favoritism, and unethical builder. Shame.

39 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by EJM on 07/14/2017 at 10:28 PM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

It sounds to me as if the City may be giving special consideration to some and not all. I smell a rat.

34 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Barbara Geiger on 07/14/2017 at 9:12 PM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

This is another of many examples across Raleigh where developers intimidate longtime residents and blatantly violate the stated intent of the UDO's Infill Compatibility Standards. We need more City Council members who will fight for residents over developers. Remember that on October 10th

38 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Stefanie Mendell on 07/14/2017 at 9:05 PM

Re: “A Raleigh Family Asks a Court to Stop a Developer from Erecting a 28-Foot Wall Next to Their House

UDO guidelines discuss and encourage residential infill to be compatible with existing structures. In my opinion, this structure does not.

39 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Betty Brandt Williamson on 07/14/2017 at 7:43 PM

Re: “The Bookshop Brought Many Rare and First Editions—and Two Famous Cats—to Franklin Street for Thirty-Two Years

The last thing Chapel Hill needs is another damn restaurant.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Chrysser on 07/14/2017 at 5:59 PM

Re: “Hogwashed, Part 3: Solutions Exist for the Hog Industry’s Waste-Management Problem. Why Aren’t They Being Used?

I am an N.C. hog farmer. If you are deemed to be a part of a problem, then it makes sense to me that you should play a part in the solution to that problem. I do not think that it is a lie or an exaggeration that animal agriculture (mainly swine CAFOS and poultry houses) have some odor and environmental issues. Issues that sorely need to be dealt with by our industry. I am a contract hog farmer (Butler Farms) in Harnett County N.C. and can only speak to swine issues. After 22 years in this business, I know from personal experience the true effects and environmental impact we have had on our neighbors and community. My good and loyal neighbors have told me the truth about what our little farm has done to their families and community. Knowing these truths, we have for the past 10 years, as a concerned hog farm family, made every attempt to be a part of the solution to odor and environmental issues. (Flat Branch/Anderson Creek Community). We have made these positive efforts through the use of alternate waste management innovations. The alternatives we have used are Best Management Practices (BMPs), covered swine waste storage ponds and swine waste methane to energy. Despite all the positive comments made by our industry leaders on innovation and renewables, we have seen very little encouragement and no monetary incentives to move forward with new technology. I know that our pork industry has made some improvements in waste management, odor control, and water usage, but in my opinion, we have lagged behind for far too long and have over used the economic feasibility reasoning as a deterrent. The integrators that we contract with have to be a part of the solution and have to finally realize that the current grower contracts do not pay enough for us to pay our operating expenses and in addition, take care of our accumulated hog waste and waste management issues on the 2000 to 2500 family farms in N.C. Better pay will make us better environmental stewards and that benefits everyone. I feel it is time to act and I am proud to be a part of the three (3) part discussion titled "Hogwashed" by Indy Week.
Anyone can see that our industry has been very successful in N.C. Now is the time for the industry to give back. http//www.butlerbioenergy.info

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Tom Thomas Butler on 07/14/2017 at 8:56 AM

Re: “Spider-Man: Homecoming Makes a Fifty-Five-Year-Old Hero Feel Like a Kid Again

Spiderman homecoming is the best spider man movie that I have seen yet https://goo.gl/jhKahk

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Hazel Gomez on 07/13/2017 at 5:03 AM

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