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Comment Archives: Stories: Film

Re: “Whit Stillman returns with Damsels in Distress

Loved and agreed with your review David. I might have added a word or two about the third act twist of Brit-snob Rose's (Megalyn Echikunwoke) character and that the performances by the underachiever boys Fred (Ryan Metcalf) and Fred Packenstacker / Charlie Walker (Adam Brody) were equally quirky and up to the comic timing necessary to carry off the over all tone of the film.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by marsnmark on 05/03/2012 at 11:42 AM

Re: “Polish film In Darkness digs deeper into WWII anti-Semitism

I felt that this film tried to do too much. While the perspective was fresh, it would have exelled had it stuck to the primary theme. It became distracted with subplots and derivative concepts that did little or nothing to further an already lengthy film. More of In Darkness should have found its way to the cutting room floor.

Posted by John Smith on 04/23/2012 at 4:55 PM

Re: “Polish film In Darkness digs deeper into WWII anti-Semitism

Mr. Kuranski, your comment basically trots out the same anti-semitic diatribe as Stalin's Jews, a pamphlet published alongside such notable anti-semitic works as The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Jews made up about 5% of Bolsheviks, the same as their numbers in the population at large. Yes, there were some Jewish leaders of Stalin's secret police organizations but to say 39% of Stalin's helpers were Jewish and they "gleefully carried out the orders to murder in cold blood millions of Slavic people" is a lie. Your comment perpetrates anti-semitic myths and is dreadfully shameful.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by pdeblin on 04/19/2012 at 8:12 PM

Re: “Polish film In Darkness digs deeper into WWII anti-Semitism

Why isn't their a film that talks about, as one Israeli newspaper called them, "Stalins Jews"?

According the Israeli newspaper Ynet, 39% of the Soviet helpers of Stalin were Jewish. They gleefully carried out the orders to murder in cold blood millions of Slavic people.

If this movie does not talk about Stalin's Jews, it is not giving the full and accurate context of anti-semitism in Slavic Europe. Most anti-semitism in Slavic Europe was a result of Jewish Communist atrocities against Slavic people.

1 like, 3 dislikes
Posted by Matt Kuranski on 04/12/2012 at 6:31 AM

Re: “African Diaspora Film Festival seeks perspective on hip-hop

If you like hip-hop, you might like my blog, Rhymes and Reasons. It’s a series of interviews with hip-hop heads who discuss their lives and a few songs that matter to them. Pretty powerful stuff. Check’em out here:

http://thisisrhymesandreasons.wordpress.co…

Posted by Edward Vogel on 03/30/2012 at 8:11 AM

Re: “Sadness and stultification in Albert Nobbs

Not mentioned in the review due to time and space constraints but worth noting: On Tuesday, Jan. 24, Glenn Close received an Oscar nomination for best actress while Janet McTeer received a best supporting actress nomination.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by David Fellerath, Indy Culture & Sports Editor on 01/25/2012 at 1:23 PM

Re: “Shame isn't as shaming as it thinks it is

I thoroughly enjoyed reading your take but disagree. I thought it was stunning and very effective. Fassbender and Mulligan were both cheated out of Oscar nominations--though that's a different issue entirely.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by jw9788a on 01/25/2012 at 9:44 AM

Re: “A panoply of cloying cardboard cutouts in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

"Secondly, does this child running all over NYC also address the notion the parent is in fact absent? Another assertion the reviewer made without regard to that being an overly obvious interpretation of the boy being unsupervised for such lengths of time."

Speaking of predetermined...once you see the film (I'm presuming from this comment that you haven't) you'll realize why this particular critique is off-base and why, IMO, my original criticisms hold up. However, for the record, I truly didn't consider your screed a personal attack on me or my skill set.

Posted by Neil Morris on 01/24/2012 at 7:56 PM

Re: “A panoply of cloying cardboard cutouts in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

Thank you, andersone, that ending comment is what got to me. Otherwise, though I have not seen the movie, I personally found your thoughts interesting to consider, particularly regarding the absent parent and the unsupervised child. Thanks for joining the conversation!

Posted by Denise Prickett, Indy Editorial Web Director on 01/24/2012 at 10:14 AM

Re: “A panoply of cloying cardboard cutouts in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

Ouch, my bad... I reread my original comment and guess the ending was not entirely polite! My sincere apologies for the slip. I felt the reviewer was being equally unfair in the criticism of creative talent of the creator and thus expressed so rather emotionally. My only defense, not being the professional.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by andersone on 01/23/2012 at 8:04 PM

Re: “A panoply of cloying cardboard cutouts in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

Mea Culpa for the perceived personal attack. However, I do not believe my comments where any more personal than those of the reviewer. Honestly, I do not see how my criticism was considered a personal attack rather than a comment intended to question this professionals review by pointing out several very specific assertions they made which are not entirely accurate, but used to justify a rather negative review. This just seemed more than slightly predetermined or based more on their view of how things should be rather than on the merits or the work. My point being they were not being professionally objective.

Posted by andersone on 01/23/2012 at 7:44 PM

Re: “A panoply of cloying cardboard cutouts in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

andersone, it is possible to disagree with our reviewer's opinion without making personal attacks. Please try that next time. Thanks!

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Denise Prickett, Indy Editorial Web Director on 01/23/2012 at 2:25 PM

Re: “A panoply of cloying cardboard cutouts in Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

It's a shame when folks fixate on their own opinions regarding reality; oft forgetting that their own experiences and opinions are not the entirety of the real world. I point directly to this review author's assertion that no ten year old boy running around NYC is a believe tale. Yet, I did so myself and rarely found myself as alone as you might think. Yes, a lot of folks may tend to prefer to keep their kids locked away in NYC and for good reason. But, young people are not known for being overly cooperative and often do things they really should not, regardless of their parent’s attention. Secondly, does this child running all over NYC also address the notion the parent is in fact absent? Another assertion the reviewer made without regard to that being an overly obvious interpretation of the boy being unsupervised for such lengths of time. I suggest folks watch the movie and for the reviewer here to reconsider their own skill set as lacking.

Posted by andersone on 01/23/2012 at 12:09 PM

Re: “My Week with Marilyn's intellectual slovenliness

For me the film was not at all about "mythologizing the mythical" - rather it was a portrait of our collective insecurities. Monroe's are well-known, disabling and inpenetrable. But everyone else's insecurities, from Olivier's to his wife's to the narrator's, get a moment in the spotlight making it clear to me how infected we all are and the only difference seems to be the degree to which we are hobbled.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Steph on 01/01/2012 at 9:30 AM

Re: “The Descendants

Well done film all around. Clooney does a good job playing Hawaiian, and the tough crux moments of the film are well scripted, directed and acted. We get a good sense of Matt (Clooney) as a man who doesn't know what he will do with impossible questions until the moments come, and at each turn he follows the core of who he is and discovers a bit about himself. One is left with hope that through all the trials he may finally have discovered who he really is and be ready to be a real father to his daughters who previously were enigmas to him.

Posted by MarkD on 12/31/2011 at 11:09 AM

Re: “The best (so-so) movies of 2011

Really glad Meek's Cutoff got a mention! Reichardt is a burgeoning talent.

Posted by jw9788a on 12/28/2011 at 7:51 AM

Re: “The best (so-so) movies of 2011

Tin Tin was probably the best animated movie in a long time

Posted by Chapel Hill Florist on 12/24/2011 at 4:42 PM

Re: “The best (so-so) movies of 2011

I think the bluntness and bombast in Melancholia becomes less simplistic when you consider that it's in the service of confronting nothingness.

Posted by Nathan Gelgud on 12/22/2011 at 3:37 PM

Re: “The best (so-so) movies of 2011

I'm always up for a Lars von Trier film, but in general, I like my not-so-approachable filmmakers to be a little less pushy with their themes, along with their camerawork, editing and music choices.

There are certainly unforgettable images in Melancholia.

Posted by David Fellerath, Indy Culture & Sports Editor on 12/22/2011 at 1:59 PM

Re: “The best (so-so) movies of 2011

Yes, I did notice. He's not included in the BAH!

I admit it's not a terribly approachable movie, but then again neither is any Kiarostami movie I've ever seen.

Posted by MichaelB on 12/22/2011 at 1:21 PM

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