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Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

Section 2.2.7 of UDO addresses residential infill compatibility and it states that infill should "accommodate and encourage compatible development in existing residential neighborhoods while reinforcing established character of neighborhood and mitigating adverse impacts on adjacent homes."

This structure does not come close to the UDO. The builder built the wall 6 feet taller than allowed. Other builders have built structures that comply with the UDO in this neighborhood. This is one of the most egregious examples of infill that I have seen.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Betty Brandt Williamson on 07/25/2017 at 12:00 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

Too often when things like this happen that are detrimental to property owners and neighborhoods, the city points a finger at growth as if to say, "We can't help it!" If elected officials (and in this matter, the Board of Adjustment) would simply live up to the City Council mission statement, we'd manage growth responsibly versus the anything goes approach too many favor.

http://www.raleighnc.gov/government/conten…

Here's the first four statements from the council mission statement...how's that working out for this family?

-We are a 21st Century City of Innovation focusing on environmental, cultural and economic sustainability.

-We conserve and protect our environmental resources through best practices and cutting edge conservation and stewardship, land use, infrastructure and building technologies.

-We welcome growth and diversity through policies and programs that will protect, preserve and enhance Raleigh's existing neighborhoods, natural amenities, rich history, and cultural and human resources for future generations.

-We lead to develop an improved neighborhood quality of life and standard of living for all our citizens.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by George Farthing on 07/21/2017 at 10:58 AM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

The building of McMansions isn't increasing density - these are just giant, single-family homes. This isn't population increase or mixed-use development. People aren't suddenly going to use public transit just because they now live in a bigger house!

8 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by M Elizabeth Wakeford on 07/21/2017 at 9:02 AM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

I understand the Glover's predicament. In my old neighborhood off of Six Forks Road, the same intense building of McMansions has continued at breakneck speed. What was once a neighborhood of ranch homes and split levels built in the fifties has now almost entirely been replaced with houses the size of that being built next to the Glovers. In reverse order, what very few ranch and split level homes are left stick out as sore thumbs. The Churchill Road area of Raleigh is (or was) both beautiful and convenient to many areas of the city. Unfortunately, that is no more.

While Charles Meeker was innovative in his desire to re-create Raleigh, the constant intrusion of development at warp speed was probably not in his plan (or maybe it was.) From North Hills to downtown to established neighborhoods now being over run with what could be called "steroid induced development", Raleigh's character has changed for the worse. But in the game of politics, it appears most Raleighites actually wanted this based on those they put on the City Council.

Back in my neighborhood, new houses are inching close to zero lot lines and the streets haven't fared any better. Where once one was able to take a casual stroll at the posted speed limit, those same roads are now adorned with numerous and unsightly speed bumps. i really have to wonder if this is the definition of progress.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by vocalocal on 07/20/2017 at 5:37 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

What part of a law doesn't this developer understand?? The way everything is permitted these days it's absolutely absurd to for this crook to act ignorant. I'm calling Bull on this ! He thought he could slither away with it! I hope this "David and Goliath" story swings in the Glover family's favor! Stop Corruption! TEAR DOWN THIS WALL!!

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Mollie Stokes Platt on 07/20/2017 at 5:20 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

"Strict compliance with the provisions of the ordinance would deprive Applicant from the reasonable use of the property," the board wrote as part of a long list of findings of fact. That's rich! So ONLY a 28' wall height allows 'reasonable use', all others being 'unreasonable'? Incredible!

10 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by RandyNC on 07/20/2017 at 12:27 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

I beg to differ, some of these people may indeed take transit. BRT going through that part of town could take them straight to the park, and if they ever discover the pleasure of not having to drive then it could add up. Saying that single-family home density does not have an impact on density needed to support transit is a little short-sighted. If you look at the transects that traditional density patterns follow, you'd see that even SF density increases can complement density increases in surrounding neighborhoods that are closer to transit. For example, grocery stores follow rooftops (even the tall ones) and adding a little more density here and there could add up to support a grocery store closer to the community, which in turn could support transit and reduced trips and sprawl in other areas. Looking at this as a simple citizen vs. the big bad builders and government is counterproductive and erroneous.

At least some other publications and citizens are coming around to this reality: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archi…

1 like, 8 dislikes
Posted by biIIy on 07/20/2017 at 8:20 AM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

Billy, none of these people will park there Landrovers and ride plublictransit.

12 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Arthur B Raleigh on 07/19/2017 at 9:43 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

This kind of density won't reduce sprawl or traffic. Teachers, first responders, health care workers, etc won't be able to afford to live in the city. They will be forced to live in suburbs or small towns and commute in.

I live on Oak Grove Circle inside the belt line. 4 homes sold in past few years in the $300k to $400k range. Two were moved into and are being "fixed up" in keeping with neighborhood.

One was torn down, lot subdivided and two homes built and each sold in $800k range. Lots were pretty much filled up, causing tens of thousands of dollars in damage and repairs to neighbors from stormwater runoff. (We got new Infill stormwater regulations passed which should help with future projects).

Fourth home torn down and waiting to see what takes it place. Developer who bought house originally marketed plans for $1 million plus French Provincial which is in no way compatible with existing neighborhood.

Remember to vote in 10/10 City Council elections. David Cox and Kay Crowder stand for neighborhoods!

15 likes, 6 dislikes
Posted by Stefanie Mendell on 07/19/2017 at 2:02 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

No need to worry. The exorbitant increases in property taxes due to gentrification and McMansion mentality will run them out of their home before the lack of vitamin D affects their health. Thank God all of the Yankees decided to move South. Retching and vomiting.

7 likes, 8 dislikes
Posted by DR B on 07/19/2017 at 12:33 PM

Re: “U.S. Representative David Price Wants the Feds to Regulate N.C. Hog Farms

I fully support stronger regulation in this area. The powerful lobby has had its way for too long and it is not feasible to continue.

Posted by Judy Payne on 07/19/2017 at 12:10 PM

Re: “In a Mid-Century Raleigh Neighborhood, New Mansions Are Built So High They Block Out the Sun

If you want the necessary density to support transit and reduce sprawl, you're going to have to make some concessions. Can't have it both ways

5 likes, 15 dislikes
Posted by biIIy on 07/19/2017 at 11:45 AM

Re: “Capitol Broadcasting Wants Community Input on Its American Tobacco Campus Expansion. By God We're Going to Give It to Them.

I'd take the 800 square foot studio for $500 a month, actually. As long as my neighbors are nice and quiet and i'm on the top floor.

Posted by ammi on 07/17/2017 at 3:45 PM

Re: “The Misogyny Behind the Unraveling of DSI Comedy

Thankfully our community is also home to the very talented and funny women of the Eyes Up Here comedy troupe. Keep your eyes out (and up) for future shows!

5 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by Kristin Lione on 07/16/2017 at 12:47 AM

Re: “What life is like in solitary confinement at North Carolina's Central Prison

Let's imagine these Icon prisoners that do have stimuli; being cuffed to the rear with handcuffs too tight,
summer heat waves, freezing winters, no air circulation. A lot of people have described it as being locked
up in a coffin. They are right. Now do you see why it is torture pure and simple?

Honestly even minimum security prisons here are just concentration camps in disguise. They might
as well euthanize prisoners.

Posted by John Wong on 07/15/2017 at 2:44 PM

Re: “Capitol Broadcasting Wants Community Input on Its American Tobacco Campus Expansion. By God We're Going to Give It to Them.

I want to acknowledge how lucky Durham is to have such incredible leaders in the community as provided by the Goodmon family.

Posted by duh on 07/15/2017 at 10:05 AM

Re: “McFarlane’s Attempt to Overhaul CACs Might Be a Big Issue in Raleigh’s Mayor’s Race

It's well and good for elected officials to state support for CACs after they voted May 2 to approve a report with recommendations that include the eventual eradication of CACs (as the article reports). Since May 2, there's been quite a bit of verbal gymnastics -- committing that CACs will be part of the proposed two-year process on citizen engagement, for example. Well, that's not a commitment that CACs will remain a critical component of citizen engagement at the end of the day, when this process concludes.

It would be a simple matter for Council to begin repairing the self-inflicted damage of May 2. That is by voting on August 15 to set aside the task force recommendations which include: "The complete system of CECs is intended to be a second generation of the CAC system in place currently" The full report can be downloaded at the city's web site here: http://www.raleighnc.gov/content/CorNews/D… The above quoted statement appears on the bottom of page 3.

Council members can either continue to issue flowery but ultimately meaningless statements of support of CACs, or they take an affirmative stand once and for all. How about it? The next council meeting is one month from today on August 15. Council has an opportunity to clear the confusion and uncertainty following the May 2 vote, and should demonstrate leadership we've yet to see on this important issue. Whatever the position, let's hear it: Do members favor the proposed government-directed Citizen Engagement Board that oversees Citizen Engagement Councils, or citizen-led CACs? It's not a difficult question.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by George Farthing on 07/15/2017 at 8:31 AM

Re: “Unlike Wake County and Its Register of Deeds Office, Some Counties Stop Losses with Internal Audits

Which state statute, according to Prof. Allison, requires N.C. sheriffs and registers to audit their own offices?

NCGS 159-24 et seq, including 159-32, clearly say that's the responsibility of the county's finance officer, which makes logical sense:

http://www.ncleg.net/gascripts/statutes/statutelookup.pl?statute=159

Sheriffs and registers are not elected to be CPAs. And the very purpose of an outside audit, after all, is to get an objective analysis of the office's books, which no "inside audit" could ever be expected to produce. So that argument doesn't seem to hold water.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Leanne Sigmon on 07/12/2017 at 9:25 PM

Re: “McFarlane’s Attempt to Overhaul CACs Might Be a Big Issue in Raleigh’s Mayor’s Race

I don't understand the Perry Woods response. To say that Nancy McFarlane hasn't attended to basic concerns of the public might or might not be factual, but it's not a "personal attack". Apparently the Mayor hasn't had to run a real campaign in so long that her staff have developed very thin skins.

The Mayor made herself vulnerable with a cart-before-the-horse move against CACs. Let's see if she can recover.

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by ct on 07/12/2017 at 12:29 PM

Re: “Wake County Found an Extra $3 Million. Who Decides How to Spend It—Commissioners or Bureaucrats?

Respectfully, Mr. Goldsmith, you should learn to read the CAFR before publishing things that are NOT FACTUAL. What you've decided to write here is untrue and misleading, at best.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Trixsie M on 07/07/2017 at 9:11 PM

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