Indy Week | Comment Archives | Stories | Special Issues | Dog Days of Summer

Narrow Search

  • Show Only

  • Category

  • Narrow by Date

    • All
    • Today
    • Last 7 Days
    • Last 30 Days
    • Select a Date Range

Comment Archives: Stories: Special Issues: Dog Days of Summer

Re: “Poisoning our pets

I always understood 5% was safe and not to use 10% Carbaryl.

Posted by Renée H. on 07/16/2017 at 7:09 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

Because of a few comments from 2017, I wrote the following believing the article was a recent post. I'm sure Lucy is long gone now, but I'm still posting my comment in case it's helpful to others who might come across it years later, like I did.

I'm so sorry that your little dog suffered so much (and that you experienced such anxiety) from your neighbors' use of the pesticide. My husband and I have two little girls of our own whom we couldn't possibly love more than we do. These precious little beings, who are alone among living creatures in that they love their people more than they love themselves, give us such joy. I can imagine how agonizing this was for you. And it sounds as if you're extremely fortunate that your little one pulled through. I found your article while seeking to verify something I believed to be correct regarding another toxin which has a relatively low risk to dogs, but a much higher one for cats. I had just read an article about using the pesticide pyrethrin in order to kill gnats. The author stated that the toxin poses no risk to pets, and I felt compelled to let the author know of the potential danger, especially since the writer asks for corrections. I feel sure that he wouldn't want to cause harm to a pet. I'm with you in avoiding the use of chemicals as often as possible because they can be so dangerous. Anyway, I appreciate your post, and am so relieved there was a happy ending to your story. As a side note, our older dog is nearly 15 and tore her ACL a few years ago. I didn't want to resort to surgery for her because I was scared to have her put under general anesthesia. We decided on a route involving a combination of rest and the administration of a supplement of glucosamine and chondroitin. It was a long road back to full health for her, but she did very well. Ever since, we've continued giving both of our pups, Simi and Elphie, a supplement which also has other beneficial ingredients, such as omega 3 and 6, probiotics, various vitamins and minerals, etc. We started out with the Missing Link version geared towards joint health, but (because of availability issues down the road) we have since switched to GNC's Superfood Complex Plus Joint Health (sold at PetSmart). I loved Missing Link, but the GNC product is more comprehensive, whereas ML's various offerings are much more limited in their focus (one's for joint health, another's for skin and coat, etc.). You might not have a need for this or you might already treat Lucy's mild arthritis, but I wanted to pass along the info in case it could help Lucy or another reader's pet.

I was about to post my comment, but decided to read the other comments. Some are truly obnoxious and pretty rude. #1. As Sue pointed out, Seven dust's active ingredient is carbaryl, a carbamate. Some national and international health organizations have reported that it can be dangerous to pets (the extent to which is unknown due to insufficient data), but poses a definite risk to children. This has been verified through extensive research. As of 2010, the EPA mandated that carbamates could no longer be included in new flea and tick formulations. If it were entirely safe, this wouldn't have happened. The EPA and the UK's equivalent organization have said the chemical is likely carcinogenic. In Great Britain, only professionals can legally use it. While I agree that Lucy shouldn't have had the opportunity to wander into the neighbors' yard, that doesn't diminish the fact that the pesticide can harm pets and children, at the very least. And the cancer risk is just one among many, including death. I never leave my dogs outside unattended. They're under my husband's or my supervision at all time. I live in Georgia where there are many, many dangers outside. There are no pesticides in our yard, but there often are plenty of snakes, sometimes venomous ones. If one of them was bitten by one without our seeing it, we'd have no idea what happened or especially what antivenin would be needed. That's just one of the reasons we're so protective. My husband and dogs were mere inches from stepping on a copperhead one evening 2 weeks ago (my husband's foot was in the air just inches above it. But there's an unlimited number of hazards outside, especially during the summer. Regardless of Sue's mistake in letting Lucy wander into the neighbors' garden, it's apparent that she's a good and loving pet owner. She sought medical care and did research to figure out what caused the illness. Her diligence saved Lucy's life. And I feel sure that she'll ensure nothing like this will ever happen again. #2. Just because some of you have used Sevin dust on or in the vicinity of pet play areas, that doesn't mean it's guaranteed safe for someone else's pet. Saying such a thing is irresponsible of proponents of Sevin. Like people, different dogs can be affected differently. It's better to be safe than sorry. According to legitimate studies, there's no denying that carbamates can cause health issues in some animals and humans. I love my dogs and choose to leave nothing to chance where their safety is concerned. Their little lives matter far too much to me, and I want them to be part of our family as long as is possible. Some view pets differently, I suppose. That's a shame. Furthermore, Carbaryl can be ingested, absorbed through the skin and inhaled. And it's supposed to be toxic only in higher quantities, but what constitutes a risky level in animals who generally weigh far less than adult humans? And it's possible that a curious dog could eat, breathe AND absorb through the skin this chemical compound. Besides, as Mark Cram mentioned, there are safer alternatives, such as diatomaceous earth. I also thought Cassie Hughes gave some good information. I've never used it, but I've heard good things, as far as its function as a flea preventative, about a product called Springtime Bug Off. The active ingredient is garlic powder. While fresh garlic can sometimes cause problems in some dogs, garlic powder has been found to be safe for them. I suppose fleas are a bit like vampires when it comes to avoiding garlic.

I do agree that special care must be taken when you have pit bulls. I absolutely love the breed, but not everyone does. I've heard some horror stories about evil cretins killing pit bulls or other breeds that frighten ignorant jackasses, not because of anything the dog has ever done, but because of an undeserved reputation resulting from the actions of a few. A couple of years ago, a neighbor poisoned the outside water bowl of our friend's dog, a beautiful, sweet 8 month old Rottweiler. The dog was never unsupervised, and our friend, who is just in his mid 20s, didn't realize that he shouldn't trust that no one had bothered his puppy's water or that his neighbor wasn't a demon who would kill his sweet, innocent dog. It still makes me so sad to think about it.

Some of you need a lesson in diplomacy. It's quite simple to avoid rudeness or hostility when disagreeing with someone or voicing disapproval over how someone cares for a pet. By the attitudes of some of you, you'd think Sue had attacked you personally.

1 like, 2 dislikes
Posted by Marci Sorrell on 05/11/2017 at 3:55 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

A friend of mine who has had a rescue and doggie day care/board for years, said she uses Sevin Dust on her property. She says that is how she controls fleas and other pest. She told me to get some, she even gave me the money to get it. My dogs are on flea preventive 90% of the year, but the last few years, it seems to be a come and go, as far as my yard goes and my dogs. Last year, I didn't have much of a problem controlling the fleas. The year before, I could not control them at all. My dogs were infested with them, despite the preventive. Most states had a mild winter, so I figured they may be more of a problem. But it seemed to just developed over the weekend. My dogs were miserable. No one slept in my house this past Monday night, April 17th. So I called my friend. She said to being them out when I got off work and we'd bath them and she'd give them each a Capstar to help to start getting rid of them. Then she said she used the Seresta collars on her dogs, in rescue and personal dogs and she used Sevin dust on her property. She said it was safe. Over the years, several people have made the same recommendation. But I have yet to use it. My dogs are my kids and the only family I have. The three are seniors, 10 and 12 years old. I'd hate to lose either of them because of difference of opinion on the use of Sevin Dust in my yard. I lost a German Shepherd mix to cancer and bloat 3 years ago. I'm ready to lose one of mine I have. So where would be the best place to go for the truth about Sevin Dust. I remember my uncles using it on their crops, corn, tobacco when I was a kid. But that was a whole lot of years ago.

1 like, 2 dislikes
Posted by Barbara Duke on 04/19/2017 at 1:56 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

There are several pesticide and insecticides that are harmful for our pets. You must have heard of various instances that pets accidently poisoned by common pesticides. So, you need to more careful with their health as our lack of knowledge may endanger their life and may even lead to their death. Seek advice from your Vet and buy whatever you want for your pet from https://www.petcarerx.com/. Thanks for bringing some awareness for regarding such hazardous issues.

0 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by DougHansen on 01/06/2017 at 6:22 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/researching-the-possible-hazards-of-products-made-to-stop-fleas-and-ticks/2014/08/07/7b671df0-1825-11e4-9e3b-7f2f110c6265_story.html

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by mperry on 01/05/2017 at 5:20 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

You are all funny , half of you are talking about one product . Their is a bug killer that has all types of chemicals in it, ( sevin) you can buy this anywhere. Now this is a fine white powder that is safe to use anywhere. You buy this stuff at a farm and feed store. I hope this will help some of you

12 likes, 23 dislikes
Posted by Gunhappy73 on 12/30/2015 at 12:45 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

If the neighbor out of courtesy asks before setting off Fireworks, he expects you with the same coutesy to agree.

14 likes, 22 dislikes
Posted by Fernando Jimenez Quelquejeu on 10/03/2015 at 11:40 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

Pine Sol kills fleas, ticks, & other pests as well. I treat my yard in early spring with a pesticide but then follow with monthly Pine Sol treatments. It does not hurt grass, plants, or flowers.

16 likes, 12 dislikes
Posted by Millisa Greer Brickhouse on 06/27/2015 at 10:18 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

Another pestisize called "permethrin" kill bugs but it also kill cats. Advertisers of "permethrin-10%" claims it is animal safe. but no sellers on eBay nor Amazon.com post any warnings on their listings for cats.

10 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by Henna Gaijin on 06/27/2015 at 3:27 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

These comments have been extremely useful. Forgive me if I missed the answer in this discussion but I noticed that Sevin is available in different percent strengths. I am interested in dusting my large breed dogs (both more than 70lbs) with Sevin as it seems that even the most expensive and "canine-friendly" treatments continue to fail and I can't bear to watch them suffer any longer. Can anyone suggest what percent Sevin is most suitable?

I would be grateful for any help.

8 likes, 20 dislikes
Posted by ThisMissie on 05/02/2015 at 8:31 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

What kind of Vet doesn't recognize an enlarged liver and simple blood work would have shown the liver enzymes were high. We had a hatch of ticks eggs to our surprise one morning in our bedroom and used seven dust in our home and on the dog beds to kill the ticks. 3 dogs all survived and my one dog had severe liver disease 10 years prior and she even was fine after the use of seven dust. So keep searching for another reason the dog got sick because it wasn't seven dust. Diamatacious Earth is the way to go but seven dust is also a great source for killing the bad bugs so please so stop trying to get it banned. I'm sorry you lost your dog and that it was so painful for you but it wasn't seven dust. Oh and I'd bet the neighbor was more informing you of the fireworks than asking for permission. Once you spend the money on them your not going to let them go to waist.

43 likes, 62 dislikes
Posted by Sheri Masters Salton on 04/20/2015 at 10:08 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

I also want to say, instead of using Sevin, use Diatomaceous Earth! It IS completely benign! And work GREAT on fleas and ticks and any bug for that matter! And since it doesnt kill by some toxic chemical its 100% safe!
DE is mined from long gone ancient seas or oceans and is actually fossilized microscopic animals. It kills by sticking to the waxy layer of the bugs exoskeleton and absorbs the body fluid. If you look at DE under a microscope you will see what looks like crystalized snowflakes or broken glass. When the powder comes in contact with a bug it sticks to the waxy layer of the bugs exoskeleton and as the bug moves it cuts into the exoskeleton and as a very absorbant powder, it sucks out all of the body fluid and the bug dies of dehydration. DE has hundreds of uses, especially in agriculture. I use it in my garden, on my dogs, I pour it into a pile in my chicken coop for them to take dust baths in ( and my birds dont have a single louse ), I also pour it into my chicken feed to keep roaches and mealworms out.

32 likes, 16 dislikes
Posted by Mark Cram on 03/18/2015 at 8:00 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

I first have to say, I RARELY ever post comments to articles. But as a fellow Pitbull owner, this article bothers the hell out of me!! WHY would you EVER let your dog outside UNSUPERVISED?! AND WITH ONLY A 6 INCH FENCE?! As an owner of a Pit, don't you know the stigma, bigotry and sometimes outright hate the general public has toward them?? I know, as a LONG time Pit parent of currently 3 dogs, that there are a LOT of people that want the breed exterminated! And its exactly people like you that let their dogs run around outside unleashed! Unfenced! And UNSUPERVISED! I find it extremely unlikely your Lucy just walked passed their garden and happened to breath in a little dust. More than likely, your neighbors have gotten sick of you letting your pitbull roam around unsupervised and gave her a laced treat! And later compounding it by blasting off fireworks in hopes of finishing her off! Sad but unfortunately true. As someone that rescues Pits, i see it happen all the time! We ARE slowly changing the general publics perception of this breed but it is YOUR responsibility as an owner/parent to keep them fenced or on a leash at all times outside of the house! Having rescued many of these wonderful dogs, I am totally convinced that not just anyone should be allowed to own this breed! Owning one is like having a loaded gun constantly. And just like a gun, there should be background check, along with an IQ test! When I've placed dogs in new homes, that was just the tip of the iceberg of what required to adopt one of my rescues. (Which is why i have 3 now)
I am very sorry the dog had to go through all of that! But stop blaming others for your irresponsibility and take better care of dog!

80 likes, 34 dislikes
Posted by Mark Cram on 03/18/2015 at 7:32 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

It's ignorant to assume that Sevin dust was the cause of your dog's illness. To blame your neighbor is also ignorant and rude. You have no PROOF, just your own assumptions (which I'm sure are were made because of your dislike of pesticides).

56 likes, 42 dislikes
Posted by Cynthia DeWeese on 01/18/2015 at 11:29 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

Do dogs have a full recovery without no neurological damages

3 likes, 9 dislikes
Posted by Priestley Blunte on 12/12/2014 at 6:28 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

it is so heartbreaking to hear what these animals endured. I feel for all the pets & owners regardless of how they were exposed to the toxins. any amount of toxin is too much. period. it doesn't, in my opinion , make the homeowner an irresponsible pet owner because her neighbors choose to poison their yard. obviously the 6" fence wasn't effective, but neither would a 6' tall fence be. this stuff,especially powders, is airborne. It travels away from it's designated spot w/liquid as well, lets say rain, washing it to the neighbors grass and absorbing into the ground.less concentrated obviously, still a toxin. how many of you still smoke regardless of the surgeon generals warning & known carcinogen effects? go for it. it is your body, but we are finally taking stands to protect those of us who don't want to be exposed to cancer promotion, hence smoking bans in public places. it would be ideal if there were regulations on how close to others property you can use harmful products. probably never thought of a utility pole as dangerous to you right? ever heard of people using old utility pole soaked in arsenic to start their fires? I have. look up creosole, penta pcp, and arsenics. think that stays just in their chimney? planes that drop pesticides are known to have their toxic product spread miles airborne further than where intended. so neighbors who use pesticides don't bitch when something comes your way via air or groundwater that you have no control of. as a nurse I had to flush thousands of patients pills. yes it is toxic & no longer done where i work. the safety & quality to humans & water critters was proven affected and altering the norm. I am saddened by reading the choice to drug your animals with chemicals, benedryl ect animals are like our children correct? Do they get drugged as well for your convenience because there really are many safer alternatives to chemicals if one takes the time to seek them out in the best interest of the pet, for their comfort. just because you don't see it doesn't mean there aren't side effects even in small doses and everyones (pets or people) tolerance is individual. sadly our pets & children can be poisoned, unintentionally in our own yards because of our neighbors choices, or our own. compassion spreads too & can be toxic. :) instead of insults & blame, focus on the wellbeing & prevention. it doesn't sound so ugly. and no I am not an organic tree hugger yet. just a health oriented person w/common sense.
I hope your pets are all recovered.

16 likes, 17 dislikes
Posted by Vicki Waterhouse on 08/11/2014 at 6:47 PM

Re: “Readers' stories

I absolutely loved the story about Katie written by Jane Bozarth! It was written so well I felt like I knew Katie. I would love to read more....
For us animals lovers we trust their instincts. If my dog doesn't like you then I don't like you.

Posted by Laura Babb on 08/08/2014 at 9:07 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

Be careful people. Many times people that actually WORK at these companies scan the internet constantly looking for threads like this. I, myself, have used Sevin Dust for years on our yards. We live in a very hot and humid climate here in Dallas, Texas. I have never seen any negative affects on our animals. We have five dogs and three cats. However, be careful.

54 likes, 14 dislikes
Posted by Debi Daly on 06/07/2014 at 7:51 PM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

I don't suppose that the author ever considered being a responsible pet owner. You should keep your dog in your own yard, and never let it run around unsupervised. My neighbors let their dog run all over the neighborhood. I've asked them if they hate their dog. You never know what will happen to them. Mean people could hit them or otherwise terrorize them. They can get into anything, and, like this story exemplifies, you won't know how to help them. Obviously this dog was an annoyance to the neighbors garden. Take responsibility for your own stupidity, and take better care of your pet! For that matter, be a better neighbor too!

73 likes, 53 dislikes
Posted by jour on 06/06/2014 at 8:22 AM

Re: “Poisoning our pets

Anita Guinness. A few things.
The fact that the neighbors came by and asked if it was ok to set off fireworks...and being told that she would rather NOT have them do just that...for them to do it anyways is beyond me. It's simply not right. It would be "DECENT" as you say, for them to refrain from such things, otherwise, why ask?

Secondly, just because YOUR pets lived long and fruitful lives in the midst of such poisons, doesn't mean other animals would be so lucky. Now, I'm not saying BAN such substances...but I will say your lack of compassion, in this matter, is indecent to say the least.

I agree with your point about people's self-righteousness these days. I think that it's the owner's responsibility to do what's best for their pets. Your assumption that it takes "so much" of this substance to cause harm to an animal is basically your ignorance to how chemicals work in the body. Every living thing reacts to everything differently. Again, please don't misread me...I agree that it was HER responsibility.

All I ask is that you, just like the author in some ways, get off your soapbox and have a little compassion for the animal, as WELL as the author for almost losing her loved one. Generally, people like you disgust me.

Sue, I'm so glad she's ok and if it was my Livy, I would have done the SAME THING. Dogs are our children..."some" people just don't have any compassion these days.

30 likes, 29 dislikes
Posted by Catalyst on 05/22/2014 at 7:01 PM

Our Guides

© 2017 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation