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Monday, May 4, 2015

Durham Police: protests, body cameras and troubling crime reports

Posted by on Mon, May 4, 2015 at 12:46 PM

Mydron Jones of Durham listens to the speakers with about 250 others who attended the protest that began at the Durham Police Station and ended with a march to the Durham County Jail. The demonstration was held in solidarity with the protesters in Baltimore. - PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER
  • Photo by Alex Boerner
  • Mydron Jones of Durham listens to the speakers with about 250 others who attended the protest that began at the Durham Police Station and ended with a march to the Durham County Jail. The demonstration was held in solidarity with the protesters in Baltimore.

Anything that could be thrown had to be removed.

In anticipation of a sizable citizen protest against Durham police last Friday, workers spent part of a stormy afternoon downtown picking up bricks. There were stacks of them on several corners, saved for streetscaping projects.Given the tense and often combative relationship between Durham Police and many citizens, particularly in communities of color, the streets needed apparently swept of potential projectiles.

However, as if on cue, the storm clouds parted, the sun came out and the three-hour demonstration and march, held in solidarity with Baltimore protesters over police brutality, was peaceful. The mood was buoyed by Maryland State's Attorney General Marilyn Mosby, who hours before had filed felony charges against six Baltimore officers over the death of Freddie Gray. But if past is prologue, somewhere in America, any day now there will be another Freddie Gray.

These tragedies always prompt the old trope: Can it happen here? Social justice advocates and defense attorneys argue that in Durham, it already has. In 2013, there was a spate of officer-involved, fatal shootings—Derek Walker and Jose Ocampo—and the case of Jesus Huerta, who allegedly shot himself while handcuffed in the back of a DPD car. (No criminal charges were filed against the officers.)
Desmera Gatewood speaks to the attendees of the demonstration and march that started in front of the Durham Police Station. - PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER
  • Photo by Alex Boerner
  • Desmera Gatewood speaks to the attendees of the demonstration and march that started in front of the Durham Police Station.

A driver shows support for the protesters marching on Mangum Street toward the Durham County Jail. - PHOTO BY ALEX BOERNER
  • Photo by Alex Boerner
  • A driver shows support for the protesters marching on Mangum Street toward the Durham County Jail.


The erosion of trust between Durham police and citizens is real—and warranted. Contrary to the chief's exhortations, a city report concluded that racial profiling and bias exists at DPD. Last year, we learned a cop used a bogus 911 call to gain entry into a suspect's home. Last week, we reported on an unconstitutional search and seizure conducted by a DPD officer.

Body cameras could help hold police accountable, although issues of privacy, access have not been resolved. On the state level, House Bill 713, would make the recordings off-limits to the public until an investigation is complete, which could take years.

At tonight City's Council meeting, Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez is scheduled to discuss the city's first-quarter crime report. If a U.S. Department of Justice analysis, released last month, is any indication, the news will not be good. The number of gun-related murders and aggravated assaults is increasing in Durham; the number of convictions has fallen. African-American boys and men ages 15–34 are at greatest risk of being killed by a gun. The rate is 41.6 per 100,000 people, about eight times the national rate. By contrast, the rate is 38 per 100,000 for Hispanics, and just 7.2 for whites.

I remembered that statistic while at last week's protest. I came upon a group of African-American teenagers who were waiting for the march to begin. They were doing what any kids would do on a crisp Friday afternoon in spring: Hanging out, taking selfies, smoking a few cigarettes up by the railroad tracks. I wanted every opportunity and possibility for them. But, frankly, I was worried. Especially for the boy.

PHOTO BY LISA SORG
  • Photo by Lisa Sorg

  
Waiting for the marchers to arrive at the Chapel Hill Street bridge. - PHOTO BY LISA SORG
  • Photo by Lisa Sorg
  • Waiting for the marchers to arrive at the Chapel Hill Street bridge.

Walking back from the protest. - PHOTO BY LISA SORG
  • Photo by Lisa Sorg
  • Walking back from the protest.



Also, put these dates on your calendar: Public forums on DPD's potential use of body cameras:


  • Monday, May 11, 6–7:30 p.m., Durham Public Schools Staff Development Center, 2107 Hillandale Road
  • Tuesday, May 12, 6–7:30 p.m., Antioch Baptist Church, 1415 Holloway St.
  • Thursday, May 14, 5:30–7 p.m., City Hall
  • Tuesday, May 19, 6–7:30 p.m., Russell Memorial CME Church, 703 S. Alston Ave.
  • Wednesday, May 20, 10–11:30 a.m., Durham Housing Authority, 330 E. Main St.
  • Thursday, May 28, 6–7:30 p.m., Southwest Regional Library, 3605 Shannon Road

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