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Friday, October 20, 2017

Movie Review: Less a Whodunit Than a “Who Cares,” The Snowman Is Truly Abominable

Posted By on Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 5:15 PM

The Snowman★ Now playing In theory, there's a good movie swirling around The Snowman. The drab, snowy Norwegian setting is an effective canvas for a Nordic noir. The film has an award-winning director in Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One In and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy), two Oscar-winning editors, a pair of Oscar-nominated screenwriters, and Martin freakin’ Scorsese as executive producer. The glittering cast includes J.K. Simmons, Rebecca Ferguson, Toby Jones, Charlotte Gainsbourg, and Michael Fassbender as detective Harry Hole. But there’s an early, seemingly innocuous clue that things are awry when a character refers to a city being “a...

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Movie Review: The Paintings of van Gogh Come to Dazzling Life in Loving Vincent

Posted By on Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 12:05 PM

Loving Vincent ★★★½ Now playing The historical drama Loving Vincent, concerning the life and death of Vincent van Gogh, is being billed as the world's first fully painted feature film. Indeed, each of the 65,000 frames in this movie was hand-painted by a small army of artists over the course of seven years, with the intention of bringing the paintings of van Gogh to life. The outcome of all this effort is exceptionally vivid and beautiful. The film's animation technique essentially combines rotoscoping—painting on top of each film frame—with elements of form and style from van Gogh's most famous paintings....

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North Carolina's Strengthened Indie-Professional Dance Community Puts Its Mark on the NC Dance Festival and Emergence

Posted By on Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 9:57 AM

The NC Dance Festival The Rickhouse, Durham October 12, 2017 Emergence PSI Theatre, Durham Arts Council October 14, 2017 In its first ever self-produced showcase in Durham, the NC Dance Festival took several legitimate steps toward embracing a growing community of independent, professional dance artists from across the state, a population it hasn’t always known what to do with. But with only sixty people in attendance—a fraction of the audiences Durham Independent Dance Artists and others have summoned in recent years—few witnesses observed these needed innovations on a drizzly Thursday night. Terpsichorean in-jokes rippled through Welcome, Rachel Barker’s sharp-toothed tribute...

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Thursday, October 19, 2017

Theater Review: Looking for a Laser Show? Tom Stoppard's Pink Floyd-Derived Darkside Is Not That Kind of Trip.

Posted By on Thu, Oct 19, 2017 at 6:35 AM

Darkside ★★★ Through Sunday, Oct. 29 Burning Coal Theatre Company, Raleigh Let’s get the consumer advisory out of the way. If you’re looking for a rock-and-blues bliss-out after some pre-show doobage, Brit Floyd, the Pink Floyd tribute band, will be in Charlotte next month. (Enjoy the light show.) For all its achievements and difficulties, Burning Coal’s production of Tom Stoppard’s Darkside, a work that, unlike The Wizard of Oz, was intentionally crafted to sync up with Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon, is not that kind of trip. At first, there is an air of playfulness in central character...

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Theater Review: For an Early-Nineties Kid, The Little Mermaid Musical Is Virtually Review-Proof

Posted By on Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 5:42 PM

The Little Mermaid ★★★ (if you aren’t nostalgic for the movie) | ALL THE STARS!!! (if you are) Through Sunday, Oct. 22 Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham “The Mermaid Affair.” That’s what my companion and I, just a pair of thirty-eighters, codenamed (with mock-mock embarrassment) our excursion to DPAC to bask in the stage musical of a Disney movie so deeply etched on our early-nineties formative years as to be virtually unreviewable. You know the story, right? Mermaid seeks love on land, trades voice to witch for legs, calamity and redemption ensue? Let's swim on. I can sort of rate the...

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Saturday, October 7, 2017

Dance Review: In Pam Tanowitz and Simone Dinnerstein's New Work for Goldberg Variations, a Daunting Idea Works Just Right

Posted By on Sat, Oct 7, 2017 at 5:24 PM

Pam Tanowitz Dance & Simone Dinnerstein: New Work for Goldberg Variations ★★★★½ Friday, Oct. 6 & Saturday, Oct. 7, 8 p.m. Duke's Reynolds Industries Theater, Durham In complete darkness, Simone Dinnerstein draws out the first few notes of the aria that begins Bach’s Goldberg Variations. Then, slowly, a stage light fills in the outline of the pianist and a group of figures scattered upstage, softly illuminated in periwinkle. When the aria returns after thirty variations, they gather in a similar formation, and the light closes in on Dinnerstein’s final gesture, levitating just above the keys. “What a pleasure it has...

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Friday, October 6, 2017

Movie Review: Blade Runner 2049 Reminds Us It Works Best to Mess with the Classics When There's Actually Something Wrong with Them

Posted By on Fri, Oct 6, 2017 at 9:16 AM

Blade Runner 2049 ★★★★ Now playing Blade Runner was influential and groundbreaking cinema, a science-fiction film noir that applied classic philosophical and religious themes, particularly on creation and mortality, to humankind’s technological and moral trajectory. It is also insistently inscrutable and bears the scar tissue of excessive, repeated editing, first in a futile effort to make the theatrical release more accessible and then to restore director Ridley Scott’s original narrative vision. Like its retrofitted future, the film is heady bricolage. Set thirty years after the original, Blade Runner 2049 achieves the best of both worlds. The same basic premise remains:...

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Sunday, October 1, 2017

Theater Review: The South Is Hard to Hear in the Opera Version of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain

Posted By on Sun, Oct 1, 2017 at 10:41 AM

Cold Mountain★★½ Thursday, Sep. 28, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 1, 2 p.m. UNC’s Memorial Hall, Chapel Hill It’s a first principle of adaptation: the main reason to translate an artwork into another medium is to explore it more fully, to draw out facets its first form could not. Ultimately, an adaptation stands or falls on two points: how it enhances our experience of the work that inspired it, and how faithful it is to that work. These criteria leave us with mixed thoughts on Cold Mountain, composer Jennifer Higdon and librettist Gene Scheer’s operatic adaptation of Charles Frazier’s best-selling novel,...

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Friday, September 29, 2017

Movie Review: In Battle of the Sexes, Billie Jean King Overhand Smashes a Paper-Thin Glass Ceiling

Posted By on Fri, Sep 29, 2017 at 2:43 PM

Battle of the Sexes ★★★½ Now playing The most pitched battle in Battle of the Sexes is not strictly on the tennis court. Odds makers and popular opinion alike were very much against Billie Jean King (Emma Stone) in her famous 1973 tennis match against Bobby Riggs (Steve Carell). The question the match posed was not whether a professional female player could beat a male peer. It was whether the best female tennis player in the world could beat any competent man, in this case, a cartoonish, fifty-five-year-old former pro. The film’s true foil is a male-dominated culture ripe for...

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Movie Review: In American Made, Tom Cruise Is Back in the Cockpit—But For Coke, Not Country

Posted By on Fri, Sep 29, 2017 at 8:09 AM

American Made ★★★½ Now playing In Top Gun, a young Tom Cruise played an eighties-era pilot in the service of the U.S.A. More than thirty years later, Cruise—still flashing a cocksure facade of pearly whites and aviator shades—goes back to the eighties to portray the real-life pilot Barry Seal, a cynical analog to that previous role. In American Made, the enemy is no longer faceless bad guys in black fighter planes. The hindsight of history reveals a tangled web of black ops and duplicity, with splintered American law enforcement agencies as much at odds with one another as with their...

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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Theater Review: At Sonorous Road, Sandi Toksvig's Silver Lining Is a Needed but Shaky Showcase for Older Female Actors

Posted By on Thu, Sep 28, 2017 at 3:42 PM

Silver Lining★★½ Through Sunday, Oct. 1 Sonorous Road Theatre, Raleigh True confession: it’s still a thrill when a new theater company hangs out its shingle, and the fewer names I recognize on a press release or playbill, the greater my curiosity is. That was particularly true of Peony Productions and its first project, the dark comedy Silver Lining at Sonorous Road. Decades before the Women’s Theatre Festival came to the Triangle, women here were having difficulty finding meaningful roles outside of the constricting bandwidth of ingénue, femme fatale, or loving wife; past a certain age, they basically went missing on our stages....

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Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Theater Review: After His Audacious Hamlet, Director Jeremy Fiebig Makes Another Theatrical Gamble in King Lear

Posted By on Wed, Sep 13, 2017 at 2:08 PM

King Lear★★ Through Sep. 24 William Peace University’s Leggett Theatre, Raleigh There’s a moment near the end of King Lear when the blind Earl of Gloucester wonders if he’s been misled. Though he has asked a companion to lead him to the edge of a dramatic precipice, the ground underfoot seems less than mountainous. Regrettably, this joint production by Raleigh’s Honest Pint Theatre and Fayetteville’s Sweet Tea Shakespeare left us feeling much the same way. By conspicuously lowering the play's stakes, director Jeremy Fiebig reduces Shakespeare’s theatrical Everest to something nearly unbelievable: an ultimately cheerful jaunt around a rustic barn. Last...

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Tuesday, September 12, 2017

As the Durham Bulls Enter the Playoffs, We Wonder: What Exactly Is the Value of a Minor-League Championship?

Posted By on Tue, Sep 12, 2017 at 3:42 PM

The Durham Bulls begin the International League championship series at home tonight. It’s the Bulls’ seventh appearance in the finals in ten years, a remarkable accomplishment in the volatile realm of Triple-A baseball. But what exactly is the value of a minor-league championship, even to the players vying for it? They wear Durham Bulls uniforms but are employees of the Tampa Bay Rays, the Bulls’ parent club, which controls farmhands’ assignments to working affiliates that function as training grounds. These guys are trying to get out of Durham. Those who are still here just missed their best chance. Triple-A is...

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Friday, September 8, 2017

Movie Review: It Is Plenty Scary, But It Also Has Heart

Posted By on Fri, Sep 8, 2017 at 3:52 PM

It ★★★★ Now playing Theodicy is a theological term that refers to the problem of evil as an active force in the world.  More specifically, it's an attempt to resolve the dilemma in many Western religions of how evil can exist in a universe supposedly created and governed by an all-powerful and benevolent God. It's a puzzler, all right. In the very excellent, very scary horror film It—based on Stephen King's famous novel—there's no ambiguity about the existence of evil. In the hard-luck town of Derry, Maine, the power of darkness manifests as a terrifying clown named Pennywise, a shapeshifting demonic...

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Friday, September 1, 2017

Movie Review: Though Brightened by Its Lead Actor, Patti Cake$ Is a Sub-8 Mile Hip-Hop Contrivance

Posted By on Fri, Sep 1, 2017 at 3:05 PM

Patti Cake$ ★½ Now playing As Chuck D sagely warned us, so many years ago: Don't believe the hype. Patti Cake$, the hip-hop drama that premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, is getting a lot of frankly baffling hype as it rolls into theaters for a late-summer release. Fox Searchlight Pictures, the boutique imprint that has backed a long list of very good films over the years, including Birdman, Slumdog Millionaire, Sideways, Little Miss Sunshine, and Beasts of the Southern Wild, snapped it up at Sundance. But Patti Cake$ doesn't belong anywhere near that list, and it's...

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Thursday, August 31, 2017

Theater Review: Count Dispels the Anesthetic of Distance from Death Row

Posted By on Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 1:30 PM

Count★★★½ Closed Aug. 27 Kenan Theatre, Chapel Hill Distance is a powerful anesthetic. The farther we live from neighborhoods blighted by the ammoniac stench of a commercial hog farm’s waste lagoons, for example, the less likely we are to feel their pain. If we never see the bodies crippled by black lung, which is on the rise again among Appalachian coal miners, or the stolen adolescence of foreign textile workers, it’s easier for us to deny their reality. Count, the profoundly disquieting new docudrama by Lynden Harris, makes it clear that the same is true of capital punishment, particularly the...

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Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Movie Review: Ferguson Documentary Whose Streets? Portrays a Police Force and Judicial System Obsessed with the Idea of Black Criminality

Posted By on Wed, Aug 30, 2017 at 2:35 PM

Whose Streets?★★★ Now playing Three years ago, Darren Wilson, a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, shot unarmed eighteen-year-old Michael Brown, whom Wilson was attempting to apprehend for stealing a box of Swisher cigars from a convenience store. Following the police’s destruction of Brown’s memorial, a series of riots ensued that would play out in months of unrest, highlighting systematic police brutality against African Americans as one of the most pressing issues facing the country. Whose Streets?, the new documentary by Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis, tells the story of the Ferguson uprisings. It powerfully stages the issues roiling our historical...

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Wednesday, August 23, 2017

A Twenty-One-Year-Old Finds a Welcoming Space at the Twenty-Two-Year-Old N.C. Gay and Lesbian Film Festival

Posted By on Wed, Aug 23, 2017 at 12:46 PM

North Carolina Gay and Lesbian Film Festival August 10–13, 2017 Carolina Theatre, Durham The North Carolina Gay and Lesbian Film Festival has been an institution at the Carolina Theatre in Durham for twenty-two years. Over the course of its history, the festival has grown exponentially in terms of submissions as well as the number of people in the audience, leading to its current status as one of the largest gay and lesbian film festivals in the Southeast. It's rare to find spaces that are focused on the celebration of queer people outside of the alcohol-drenched club and bar scene. I...

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Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Durham Independent Dance Artists Announces New Season Balancing "Risk and Excellence"

Posted By on Tue, Aug 15, 2017 at 12:26 PM

The past three seasons from Durham Independent Dance Artists have exemplified creative experimentation. Some artists mounted multimedia collaborations in nontraditional venues; others prioritized work that passed the reins to audience members. In its next season, beginning in October, DIDA is particularly interested in highlighting the ways different artists leverage risk in performance—and, as DIDA organizer Justin Tornow says, “strive toward balancing risk and excellence.” So what will this look like? Among the 2017–18 artists, some names—Anna Barker, Ginger Wagg—are familiar from past seasons. Culture Mill’s Murielle Elizéon will present her first U.S. solo; Nicola Bullock, a DIDA founder based in...

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Friday, August 11, 2017

Movie Review: Scary Nuns, Creepy Dolls, and Not a Few Plot Holes in The Conjuring Franchise's Latest Spawn, Annabelle: Creation

Posted By on Fri, Aug 11, 2017 at 4:33 PM

Annabelle: Creation ★★★½ Now playing On a recent library whim, I picked up an anthology of contemporary horror stories—nominees for the annual Bram Stoker Award for short fiction, I think it was. It was a very nice surprise, actually. Fans of the genre will be happy to hear that innovative and sophisticated horror is alive and well in that old-fashioned analog medium we call books. Annabelle: Creation, the latest installment in The Conjuring horror series, plays like a pleasant little short story, and by pleasant I mean eerie, disturbing, and occasionally gory. Technically a prequel to a spinoff, the movie...

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Theater Review: A Southern Baby Shower Goes Off the Rails in Sweet Tea and Baby Dreams

Posted By on Fri, Aug 11, 2017 at 2:04 PM

Sweet Tea and Baby Dreams★★½ Through Sunday, August 13 Meredith College's Jones Studio Theatre, Raleigh It was a split decision on a show that first got me into theater criticism, twenty-four years ago—a production so problematic, of a new script so promising, that I was convinced critics would focus on the former and disregard the latter. So I wrote a different opinion. Someone decided it was worth publishing. Things, as they say, progressed from there. I’m experiencing a bit of déjà vu while considering Sweet Tea and Baby Dreams, Maribeth McCarthy’s dramedy about the worst possible baby shower in the most Southern...

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Thursday, August 3, 2017

Manbites Dog Theater Is Closing After Its 2017-18 Season, Turning Into an Artist-Support Organization

Posted By on Thu, Aug 3, 2017 at 3:35 PM

Manbites Dog Theater, the region’s oldest independent theater company, has announced plans to close and sell its theater building on Foster Street at the end of its upcoming 2017-18 season. The news shocked the area’s artistic community, coming one week after the venerated company announced the details of its thirty-first—and now, final—season as a producing organization. In a press release on Tuesday evening, Manbites Dog’s board of directors framed the decision as a transition from the first two stages of the company’s life, as an itinerant theater troupe that found a stable venue in downtown Durham in 1998, to its...

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A Lust for Rust: Susan Harb's Guitars Give New Meaning to "Heavy Metal" in FAR OUT! The Art of Rock 'N' Roll at Gallery C

Posted By on Thu, Aug 3, 2017 at 8:50 AM

FAR OUT! The Art of Rock 'N' Roll Reception: Friday, August 4, 6–9 p.m., $8 Exhibit: Through September 17 Gallery C, Raleigh Gallery C, a pioneering mainstay of the downtown Raleigh art scene since 1985, is preparing to open its much-anticipated, fifth annual themed art event, curated by gallery owner Charlene Newsom. This year’s event celebrates the history of rock ‘n’ roll. From patron saint Elvis Presley to the psychedelic Age of Aquarius and beyond, everyone’s favorite rockers, including Prince, Gregg Allman, David Bowie, and Merle Haggard, come to life in an impressive collection of more than sixty mixed-media works...

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Wednesday, August 2, 2017

ADF Review: Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company Complete Their Analogy Trilogy, a Total Work of Art, in Durham

Posted By on Wed, Aug 2, 2017 at 3:24 PM

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company: Analogy/Ambros: The Emigrant ★★★★½ Saturday, July 29 Durham Performing Arts Center, Durham In the mid-1800s, European culture thought it had a fairly clear idea of what the ultimate synthesis of art forms looked and sounded like. Opera works like Wagner’s Ring Cycle combined music, literature, choreography, theater, and visual art in set and costume design, attempting to create a transcendent experience: a Gesamtkunstwerk, or total work of art. If the American Dance Festival performance of Analogy/Ambros: The Emigrant didn’t fully illustrate director Bill T. Jones’s hunger for such an artistic fusion in the service of...

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Friday, July 28, 2017

Movie Review: Atomic Blonde Is More Like Dime-Store John le Carré than Joan Wick or Jane Bond

Posted By on Fri, Jul 28, 2017 at 4:38 PM

Atomic Blonde★★★ Now playing There’s a futile fatalism floating around Atomic Blonde, set in 1989 during the days leading up to the fall of the Berlin Wall. The East-versus-West spy game still carries life-or-death stakes, but it also feels propelled by a dutiful inertia, predestined to play out like the gunslingers in Once Upon a Time in the West squaring off for a final climactic duel before getting freight-trained by the march of capitalism. This contrast figures prominently in Antony Johnston’s 2012 source graphic novel, The Coldest City. Adapted for the screen by David Leitch (codirector of John Wick) and...

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...as did I, Ms. Margolis -- in a very small handful of moments over a two and a half hour …

by Byron Woods, INDY Theater and Dance Critic on Theater Review: The South Is Hard to Hear in the Opera Version of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain (Arts)

I certainly heard the accents.

by Elizabeth A Margolis on Theater Review: The South Is Hard to Hear in the Opera Version of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain (Arts)

Nice write up. Love the twists and turns and I hardily agree with the ultimate statement (and Camus since I …

by Perry on As the Durham Bulls Enter the Playoffs, We Wonder: What Exactly Is the Value of a Minor-League Championship? (Arts)

Just saw this last night. Did Rubin say that being around the Avetts would make life "matter" or just that …

by Drew Rhys on Full Frame: An Avetts Agnostic Finds Some Faith in May It Last: A Portrait of the Avett Brothers (Arts)

She made me a peanut butter and banana sandwichwithout bread. Now that's art.

by Geoff Dunkak on ADF Review: Queering Objects and Decoding the Body in Cherdonna's Clock that Mug or Dusted (Arts)

Comments

...as did I, Ms. Margolis -- in a very small handful of moments over a two and a half hour …

by Byron Woods, INDY Theater and Dance Critic on Theater Review: The South Is Hard to Hear in the Opera Version of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain (Arts)

I certainly heard the accents.

by Elizabeth A Margolis on Theater Review: The South Is Hard to Hear in the Opera Version of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain (Arts)

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