Arts | Indy Week
Arts
INDY Week's arts blog

Archives | RSS | Follow on

Thursday, April 26, 2018

N.C. State Alum Tim Kirkman Returns to Screen and Discuss His Acclaimed Indie Drama, Lazy Eye

Posted By on Thu, Apr 26, 2018 at 4:15 PM

Friday, April 27 NCSU's Hunt Library, Raleigh 7 p.m., free, www.ncsu.edu "Tim Kirkman's drama about two men who reunite after fifteen years is so well-written and acted you feel like you're eavesdropping," Variety said of Lazy Eye, an indie feature that came out in 2016. Fifteen years after a summer fling, Dean and Alex reunite in the Mojave Desert, a sprawling backdrop for a sprawling conversation that slowly reveals how their lives have developed, why they've been out of touch for all these years, and what they mean to each other now. It's one of those timeless walking-and-talking films...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Durham Independent Dance Artists Branches Out Into Indian Classical Dance with Ramya Kapadia

Posted By on Thu, Apr 26, 2018 at 4:09 PM

Sunday, April 29 Ramya Kapadia:Mataram Walltown Children's Theatre, Durham 4:30-7:30 p.m., $10-$20, www.didaseason.com The names of Indian dance can seem intimidating, but they're clearer when you break them down. Take the female dance form Bharatanatyam, for example: it's a long string of letters, but that's because its syllables describe all four of the classical form's major elements. "Bha" is short for bhava, or emotion, in Sanskrit. "Ra" stands for raga: music. "Ta" means rhythm, or taala. And natyam's easy: dance. Put it all together and Bharatanatyam is emotional, rhythmic, musical movement. Local dance artist Ramya Kapadia has studied the...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

A Party Bro and His Lonely Mom Switch Roles in Tom Perrotta's Latest Suburban Satire, Mrs. Fletcher

Posted on Thu, Apr 26, 2018 at 3:37 PM

Tuesday, May 1 Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill 7 p.m., free, www.flyleafbooks.com Even if you haven't read novelist Tom Perrotta, you likely know his brand of spiky satire in Northeastern suburbs from its high-profile jaunts into other forms, such as Alexander Payne's film adaptation of Election or HBO's series based on The Leftovers. Perrotta is up to his usual sociocultural hijinks in his new best-seller, Mrs. Fletcher, which he brings to Flyleaf Books this week. A party-ready freshman bro named Brendan finds campus life much different than he'd imagined, and he winds up branded a "HUGE DISAPPOINTMENT" in someone's art...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, April 20, 2018

Hamilton and Star Wars Parodies Are on Tap in ShakesBEER II: The Bard Strikes Back

Posted By on Fri, Apr 20, 2018 at 4:00 AM

Sunday, April 22-Thursday, May 3 Various venues, Triangle-wide 8 p.m., donations accepted, www.baretheatre.org "We've upped the ante on everything," director Dustin Britt says about Bare Theatre's all-new collection of comic Shakespearean sots, which embarks on a springtime tour of Triangle bars this week. Once again, adaptor Charles Keith scripts a mash-up of the Bard's most famous boozers as we've never even remotely seen them before. Antony and Cleopatra get the Scorsese treatment before a ukulele orchestra (!) reframes a clutch of Shakespeare's clowns in a five-minute mini-musical by—who else?—Cole Porter. A Hamilton parody is on tap, plus a Star...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, April 19, 2018

At NRACT, the Inventive Peter and the Starcatcher Finds Some Fresh Life in the Old Pan Tale

Posted By on Thu, Apr 19, 2018 at 1:51 PM

Friday, April 20-Sunday, May 6 North Raleigh Arts and Creative Theatre, Raleigh 8 p.m. Fri. & Sat./3 p.m. Sun., $17-$20>br> www.nract.org In the absolute morass of Peter Pan-related sequels, prequels, and re-imaginings—call them vampires, robots, aliens, punks, whatever, it's still about boys who just won't grow up—Rick Elice's adaptation of Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson's YA novel series about Pan's origin is a welcome standout. The production deliberately employs the limitations of the stage to create a breathlessly paced and self-aware tale of a journey to a mysterious island, using minimalist props and lighting to convey everything from giant...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Want to Be The Carrack's New Director? Laura Ritchie Is Stepping Down This Summer.

Posted By on Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 9:09 AM

Laura Ritchie, the director of The Carrack Modern Art, announced in a press release yesterday that she is stepping down from her position in June, after seven years as the leader of the nonprofit community gallery, a mainstay in the Durham art scene. Ritchie cofounded The Carrack in 2011 and has since grown the volunteer-run, zero-commission gallery (meaning artists keep all money from sales) into a sustainable art and community space with a paid staff. Hosting the work of more than one thousand artists to date, Ritchie made The Carrack a cornerstone, supporting local artists who otherwise had few platforms and...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Though It Perplexed New York, Steve Martin and Edie Brickell's Appalachian Musical Bright Star Should Fare Well Here

Posted By on Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 4:00 AM

Tuesday, April 17-Sunday April 22 Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh 7:30 p.m. nightly/2 p.m. Sat. & Sun., $21–$45 www.dukeenergycenterraleigh.com Don't let the supposed simplicity of old-time music fool you; its composers only get there after they've carefully whittled away absolutely everything inessential to the story or the song. What remains is spare, direct, distilled, its emotional impact magnified as a result. Comedian, playwright, and banjo picker Steve Martin and songwriter Edie Brickell's 2016 Appalachian-based musical, Bright Star, stemmed from their two albums of new folk music, Love Has Come for You and So Familiar. It would be hard to imagine source...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Full Frame: The Price of Everything Is a Nuanced Indictment of Art's Relationship to Money

Posted By on Thu, Apr 12, 2018 at 12:27 PM

The Price of Everything★★★★½ Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Durham I had been waiting for this documentary for almost ten years. In the early 2010s, I was an art history graduate student working at a mid-level gallery in New York’s Chelsea scene, wanting to experience the world of contemporary art firsthand. I was certainly in for a surprise, finding that art galleries were more akin to Wall Street than the avant-garde collective of makers I had romanticized. Instead, I witnessed the art market operating as a form of currency and exchange; paintings were financial assets analogous to stocks and...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Full Frame: Fred Rogers, Who Benevolently Raised Generations of Children on Public Television, Gets His Due in Won't You Be My Neighbor?

Posted By on Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 11:28 AM

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?★★★★½ Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Durham Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, the story of the nationally beloved TV icon known as Mr. Rogers, captures the incredibly genuine nature of the late Fred Rogers. This man was not making a television show to strike it rich, wield power, prove someone right or wrong, or make something of himself. He made the show because he cared so deeply about children, about helping them process their thoughts and feelings in a complex world of adults who told them they would understand everything when they were older. Through...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Mike Bartlett Rewrites Future History in King Charles III at Burning Coal

Posted By on Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 4:00 AM

Thursday, April 12-Sunday, April 29 Burning Coal Theatre, Raleigh 7:30 p.m. Thu.–Sat./2 p.m. Sun., $15–$25 www.burningcoal.org Britons beware. Should the scenario in Mike Bartlett's "future history" play, King Charles III, hold water, the political and civil upheaval awaiting the scepter'd isle after the death of its current leader could well place America's current divisiveness in deep shade. At the outset of the Olivier-Award-winning 2014 script, Queen Elizabeth II is dead and the new monarch, Charles, the current Prince of Wales, faces a threat to his rule after Parliament passes a bill limiting freedom of the press in the wake...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

600 Highwaymen Enlists the Audience to Perform in The Fever at Current

Posted By on Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 4:00 AM

Wednesday, April 11-Sunday, April 15 Current Artspace + Studio, Chapel Hill Various times, $10–$20 www.currentunc.org It was an effective public service advertisement. I can still hear it now, some three decades later. Instead of demanding our money or time, Jimmy Stewart's prairie voice, soliciting for the American Red Cross, simply asked a gentle but conscience-pricking question: "Where do you fit in, neighbor?" New York theater company 600 Highwaymen poses a similar query in The Fever, its latest experiment in citizen performance—a theatrical form devoted to exploring the boundaries of audience participation. The company placed its adult-themed 2014 music-theater drama...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Sunday, April 8, 2018

Full Frame: Connecting 306 Hollywood to Other Artworks About Rifling Through Someone's Stuff

Posted By on Sun, Apr 8, 2018 at 8:24 AM

Those of us who caught 306 Hollywood at Full Frame on Friday had a front-row seat to the evolution of the definition of “documentary.” An anthropological study of the filmmaking team’s grandmother after her death, it's nonfiction only in the broadest sense. Brother-and-sister duo Jonathan and Elan Bogarin excavate their grandmother’s home, organize her possessions by type or color, use magical-realist devices to visit the past, and reenact their process with stylistic flair. They use dance, theater, visual art, and straight-up library-style cataloging to get at the nature and meaning of their grandmother’s life. In interrogating their grief, they...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Full Frame: Talal Derki Daringly Infiltrates a Jihadist Community in Of Fathers and Sons

Posted By on Sat, Apr 7, 2018 at 10:03 AM

Of Fathers and Sons★★★★ Friday, April 6 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Durham Have you ever glimpsed life inside a radical Islamic caliphate? If you’re reading this, you probably haven’t. Anyone who has is most likely still living inside it, not sharing its story with the world. Though they are an extreme minority to the overwhelming majority of peaceful Muslims, jihadists magnetize global media attention with their egregiously violent acts. Still, we seldom see their day-to-day life. Journalists and documentarians can't just walk in and out of radical Islamic communities. Well, not unless they have the daring to temporarily...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

The Carolina African American Writers' Collective Reads From Groundbreaking Haiku Anthology at Quail Ridge

Posted By on Sat, Apr 7, 2018 at 4:00 AM

Sunday, April 8 Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh 2 p.m., free, www.quailridgebooks.com Last year, the Carolina African American Writers' collective published One Window's Light: A Collection of Haiku on Unicorn Press. Hailed as a "literal and metaphorical groundbreaker" by Journal of Foreign Languages and Cultures coeditor Lauri Ramey, the book, edited by collective founder Lenard D. Moore and featuring contributions from its members, adapts the ancient Japanese form to black life in the American South. It's the first published anthology of haiku by African Americans. Moore, L. Teresa Church, Crystal Simone Smith, Sheila Smith McKoy, and Gideon Young read from...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, April 6, 2018

Lee Hansley Gallery Celebrates Twenty-Five Years in Raleigh with Mentor/Mentee: Lope Max Diaz/Luke Miller Buchanan

Posted By on Fri, Apr 6, 2018 at 8:54 PM

Sunday, April 8 Lee Hansley Gallery, Raleigh 2–5 p.m., free, www.leehansleygallery.com Lee Hansley Gallery celebrates its twenty-five-year history in a Raleigh with, appropriately enough, an exhibit celebrating lineage. Luke Miller Buchanan studied with Lope Max Diaz at N.C. State's College of Design. Putting their paintings side by side shows how the elder's striking geometric designs influenced but found softer, more sinuous expression in the canvases of the younger artist. At this opening reception, the Russian pianist and composer Yaroslav Borisov will premiere two keyboard works inspired by the paintings, and large-scale serigraphs by Washington, D.C. artist Charlotte Robinson will...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Pleiades Gallery Asks If an Art Exhibit Can Change the World

Posted By on Fri, Apr 6, 2018 at 7:47 PM

Saturday, April 7 Pleiades, Durham 7:30 p.m., free, www.pleiadesartdurham.com This Earth Month exhibit at Pleiades gallery, on view through April 29, is poised on the grass-blade-edge between appreciating the beauty of the natural world and sounding the alarm about its dire endangerment by human recklessness and bad policy. Carin Walsh and Jenny Blazing have a multimedia installation; New Orleans artist Ana Berta Hernandez is also featured. Beyond the art, there is a variety of community programming around the exhibit, starting with this film screening and talk on Saturday featuring animated shorts such as Eri Yokoyama's "Tokio," Kunio Kato's "The...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Nine Characters, One Performer—That's the Challenge David Henderson Faces in The Absolute Brightness of Leonard Pelkey

Posted By on Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 10:02 PM

Friday, April 6-Saturday, April 21 Peace University's Leggett Theatre, Raleigh Various times, $15–$20, www.honestpinttheatre.org Nine characters, one performer. That's the challenge actor David Henderson and director Susannah Hough face in James Lecesne's one-act solo show. If you recognize the names of these regional theater veterans, the artistic principals of Raleigh's Honest Pint Theatre Co., you're already betting they're up for it. The Wes Anderson-meets-Raymond-Chandler tale concerns the disappearance of a gay fourteen-year-old after he changes the lives of a group of small-town Jersey shore denizens, from a barracuda of a hair stylist and her awkward teenage daughter to a...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Immersive Theater Work Escape to Freedom Puts You in the Shoes of an Enslaved Person Fleeing a Raleigh Plantation

Posted By on Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 9:52 PM

Saturday, April 7 & Sunday, April 8 Mordecai Historic Park, Raleigh Various times, $15, www.raleighnc.gov This interactive, harrowing historical performance is staged each year by MOJOAA Performing Arts on the grounds of one of North Carolina's largest formerly slave-powered enterprises, the Mordecai Plantation, located less than a mile from the state capitol. Over the course of an hour-long performance, costumed actors "guide and thwart" audiences during a walking—and occasionally, running and hiding—tour of the buildings and grounds of Mordecai Historic Park. Why? In this show, you're cast as one of the enslaved people who were forced to work on...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Dance Review: Burnished Movement, Striking Set Design, and a Certain Superb Style in Nederlands Dans Theater's Dreamy Show at UNC

Posted By on Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 10:56 AM

Nederlands Dans Theater ★★★★½ Thursday, March 29 UNC’s Memorial Hall, Chapel Hill It’s not even close to fair. Dancers around the U.S. work on shoestrings to create modest performances with minimal sets, and even some of the country’s most renowned modern dance companies struggle to make ends meet. And then in waltzes some European company, basking in the glow of respect traditionally accorded to the arts in Europe and fat with state funding that attracts some of the best dancers in the world and affords gorgeous, imaginative staging. It’s not right. What it can be, however, is inspiring, reminding...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

NCMA Throws an All-Nighter to Celebrate New Immersive Exhibit You Are Here: Light, Color, and Sound Experiences

Posted By on Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 7:00 AM

Saturday, April 7 & Sunday, April 8 North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh 8 p.m. Sat.–10 a.m. Sun., free–$27 www.ncartmuseum.org We usually know where we stand in relation to art: outside, looking in. You Are Here, a new exhibit at NCMA, asks what it would be like to be inside, looking out—though "asks" is too passive a term for an exhibit that plunges us into large, immersive works in light, sound, video, and mixed media by fifteen contemporary artists, whether as high-tech as Olafur Eliasson or as lo-fi as Mickalene Thomas. The exhibit also highlights a stunning addition to...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Actors Settle Unfinished Business in NRACT's Musical Comedy Miscast 2018: Warped Outcasts

Posted By on Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 4:00 PM

Friday, April 6-Sunday, April 8 North Raleigh Arts and Creative Theatre, Raleigh 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat./3 p.m. Sun., $25 www.nract.org Though I was once typecast as Linus in a production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown, please take note: I could belt out "Sweet Transvestite" with the best of them. Still, I had to face it: there was absolutely no danger I would ever be cast as Dr. Frank N. Furter in The Rocky Horror Show. North Raleigh Arts and Creative Theatre's Tim Locklear realized that many a frustrated actor had unfinished business with a show that...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Truth Against the World Captures Architect Frank Lloyd Wright at a Low Moment Before Great Success

Posted By on Sun, Apr 1, 2018 at 8:00 AM

Monday, April 2 & Tuesday, April 3 Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre, Raleigh 7:30 p.m., $6–$23, theatre.arts.ncsu.edu In 1932, architect Frank Lloyd Wright's career was on the ropes. His Prairie School of design had made his name and fortune, but Prairie was passé, and mismanaged affairs—financial and romantic—at his famous home studio, Taliesin, ruined him financially. Then the Great Depression hit. Commissions dried up, and Wright, tainted by scandal and branded a has-been, sought lecturing, consulting, and publishing gigs. In Christine Toy Johnson's Truth Against the World, Wright is giving a press conference to announce an autobiography that will set the...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, March 30, 2018

The Irresponsible Tour Takes Mega-Star Kevin Hart Back to Where He Began: Stand-Up Comedy

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 3:22 PM

Sunday, April 1 PNC Arena, Raleigh 7 p.m., $35+, www.thepncarena.com The seriously funny comedian Kevin Hart has been hard at work. Ever since his early days of open-mike comedy, you can find him in a plethora of star-studded movies—including the current hit remake of Jumanji—voice-acting in animated films, and now gearing up for another buddy-cop comedy with Ice Cube in the Ride Along series. He also established the independent comedy network Laugh Out Loud. All of this has led him back to the road for what brought him to Hollywood mogul status in the first place: stand-up. Without a...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Dance Review: Though It Offers Few Answers, Frivolous Artist Carefully Leads Us Toward Questions About Art and Participation

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2018 at 11:59 AM

Frivolous Artist ★★★★ Through Saturday, March 31 The Fruit, Durham At sunset we stood amid construction cones. On the roof of The Fruit, a trumpeter serenaded the fading light and the silhouette of downtown. Ginger Wagg, bulbous in a suit of crumpled blue paper and netting, waddled into the crowd, fishing out tiny multicolored slips and handing them to us. Mine read, “To free from difficulties.” I’m expecting at some point to not know what’s going on, I heard one audience member admit to another about the show to come. It reminded me of some promotional text I’d read about...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, March 29, 2018

Murder, My Sweet and Gun Crazy, Two Hardboiled Films of the Mid-Twentieth-Century, Meet at the Carolina

Posted By on Thu, Mar 29, 2018 at 4:00 AM

Friday, March 30 The Carolina Theater, Durham 7 p.m., $10, www.carolinatheatre.org These are two of the most hardboiled American films of the post-World-War-II era. In Murder, My Sweet, Dick Powell stars as Raymond Chandler's private eye, Philip Marlowe, at the center of a mystery that, like most of Chandler's, isn't particularly easy to follow but has tons of atmosphere and witty rejoinders. Though not the most famous cinematic adaptation of Chandler, it's considered by some fans to be closest to his original work. Gun Crazy, a 1950 film, predated Bonnie and Clyde in its depiction of two lovers on...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Calendar



Twitter Activity

Most Recent Comments

an industry funded propaganda piece that equates GMO concerns about transparency, and the slippery slope of patenting seeds and increased …

by Roy Kortick on Documentary Food Evolution Is an Unusually Measured Look at the Polarizing GMO Debate (Arts)

We will see a few dedicated people(or bots not sure on that) that will try to instill doubt about this …

by Robert Wager on Documentary Food Evolution Is an Unusually Measured Look at the Polarizing GMO Debate (Arts)

Scientific consensus was that smoking was, not only safe, but good for you, for over 70 years. While a group …

by marcuscassius on Documentary Food Evolution Is an Unusually Measured Look at the Polarizing GMO Debate (Arts)

Great movie! I finally watched it online in HD. I figured some of you guys would want to watch it …

by Vhia setiawan on Movie Review: Believe the Hype About Black Panther, an All-Time Great Superhero Saga (Arts)

Comments

an industry funded propaganda piece that equates GMO concerns about transparency, and the slippery slope of patenting seeds and increased …

by Roy Kortick on Documentary Food Evolution Is an Unusually Measured Look at the Polarizing GMO Debate (Arts)

We will see a few dedicated people(or bots not sure on that) that will try to instill doubt about this …

by Robert Wager on Documentary Food Evolution Is an Unusually Measured Look at the Polarizing GMO Debate (Arts)

© 2018 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation