Where Did All Those Flowers in Raleigh Trash Cans Come From? Find Out in NCMA's Art in Bloom | Arts
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Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Where Did All Those Flowers in Raleigh Trash Cans Come From? Find Out in NCMA's Art in Bloom

Posted by on Wed, Mar 21, 2018 at 3:00 PM

Art in Bloom - PHOTO COURTESY OF NCMA
  • Photo courtesy of NCMA
  • Art in Bloom
March 22-March 25
North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh
Various times, $13-$18
www.ncartmuseum.org

Over the past several days, vast floral arrangements began appearing in trash cans across Raleigh, turning eyesores into exuberant works of art. They were part of the North Carolina Museum of Art's pop-up campaign for the fourth-annual Art in Bloom, an exhibit that features the work of more than fifty floral artists from across the country. Each created a piece inspired by a work in the museum. This year's featured florist, Arthur Williams of the acclaimed Babylon Floral in Denver, Colorado, works with the natural structure and dynamics of organic materials to create intricate, animated pieces. He'll be showing Influenced by the East—Elements of Sogetsu Ikebana, a collection of work influenced by Japanese design, on March 23. More than a dozen related events, including a floral meditation session, a body botanicals master class, and a Bonsai for Beginners workshop, accompany the exhibit. —Nick Gallagher


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