Theater Review: Even After a Recent Revision, EverScape Playwright Allan Maule's Framing the Shot Still Feels Like Early Work | Arts
Arts
INDY Week's arts blog

Archives | RSS | Follow on

Monday, March 19, 2018

Theater Review: Even After a Recent Revision, EverScape Playwright Allan Maule's Framing the Shot Still Feels Like Early Work

Posted by on Mon, Mar 19, 2018 at 2:52 PM

click to enlarge framingtheshotweb.png
Framing the Shot
★★★
Through March 25
Sonorous Road Theatre, Raleigh


Almost a decade before he wrote EverScape, his breakout play about online-gaming culture, which won accolades at the 2015 New York International Fringe Festival, Allan Maule wrote and staged three-person comedy Framing the Shot for his master’s thesis at UNC-Chapel Hill. But even after an upgrade that flips the genders of the two main characters for this Sonorous Road production, it still feels like an earlier, less-developed work.

In Framing the Shot, a Chicago glassworker named Terry bursts into his neighbor Jacob’s apartment with a renewed lust for life. Why? Someone just took a shot at him and missed. “I thought nobody cared whether I lived or died,” Terry confides. “But today, I found out I was wrong. Somebody does care. Enough that they tried to kill me.”

Based on that affirmation, Terry, who’s a bit of a noodge, takes a sudden interest in Jacob, his nearest fellow human. But that could be a problem, as Jacob’s actually the professional killer hired to take him down. Working in Terry’s favor, though, are Jacob’s unlikely philosophical misgivings about his line of work and the doubts raised because Terry is the first person Jacob has ever missed.

Under Ira David Wood IV’s direction, this serviceable production doesn’t rise far above the dark-sitcom trappings of the script. After the gender flip, fine comic actor Lorelei Lemon readily engages as the manic Terri. Michelle Murray Wells broods as the preoccupied assassin, now named Nicola. But the paper-thin tough-guy persona Patrick Whalen gave Nicola’s hit-man boss, Lance, was as unconvincing as the script’s flimsy, convenient ending.

Update aside, Framing the Shot still feels like early work; fortunately, Maule has moved on to stronger material.

Tags: , , , , ,

Pin It

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Arts



Twitter Activity

Comments

WELCOME TO THE GREAT TEMPLE OF THE ILLUMINATI WORLD OF RICHES, FAME AND POWERS. ARE YOU A POLITICAL,DOCTOR, ENGINEER, MODEL, …

by james jack on Full Frame: The Price of Everything Is a Nuanced Indictment of Art's Relationship to Money (Arts)

Most Recent Comments

WELCOME TO THE GREAT TEMPLE OF THE ILLUMINATI WORLD OF RICHES, FAME AND POWERS. ARE YOU A POLITICAL,DOCTOR, ENGINEER, MODEL, …

by james jack on Full Frame: The Price of Everything Is a Nuanced Indictment of Art's Relationship to Money (Arts)

Here's a shout-out to the dancers and musicians of The Bipeds who are not mentioned by name in this article. …

by The Bipeds on Dance Review: The Many Moving Parts of The Bipeds' 54 Strange Words Don't Always Perfectly Mesh. But When They Do, It's Spectacular. (Arts)

You probably want to refrain from using ableist language.

by vidvis on ADF Review: Pilobolus's Crowd-Pleasing Dance Is Apolitical. Unfortunately, the World It Inhabits Is Not. (Arts)

I love stories like this.

by JoeJoey on A Villain Burglarized All Three Ultimate Comics Stores Last Night (Arts)

© 2018 Indy Week • 320 E. Chapel Hill St., Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation