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Visual Art and Artists

Friday, June 1, 2012

Interaction without ego: sarah goetz's Just Between Us opens at Durham's Carrack Gallery

Posted By on Fri, Jun 1, 2012 at 10:48 AM

The circle and the square. This phrase recalls Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man notebook drawing, in which he exemplifies the proportional relationship that the Roman architect Vitruvius asserted as optimally connecting man to the structures around him. Photo by Chris Vitiello"by how to each other we hold" (2012), suspended paper installation, sarah goetzDurham artist sarah goetz also uses circles and squares to foster connections in her multimedia installation Just Between Us, now on view at the Carrack Modern Art Gallery through June 7. For goetz, however, the connections are not architectural but aspire to be interpersonal. It would be difficult...

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Monday, March 19, 2012

El Anatsui's optimistic objects

Posted By on Mon, Mar 19, 2012 at 4:27 PM

Artists are a resourceful lot. In their hands, common materials become artifacts charged with new significance. Often this transformation is powered by an artist’s imagination or vision of metaphorical possibility. Other times it comes from sheer necessity—one uses what is at hand, almost regardless of the material itself. Western artists typically use found or discarded materials to revel in their materiality or to implicate the wasteful systems and habits that caused the materials to be discarded. There’s a whole disorganized era of “recycle/reuse” art. But this term is a luxury of the First World, a place where an infinite amount...

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Monday, February 6, 2012

What the negative saw: M.J. Sharp's long-exposure photographs at Durham's Craven Allen Gallery

Posted By on Mon, Feb 6, 2012 at 5:29 AM

Say the word “click” out loud. It’s only one syllable, but its sound has a beginning, middle and end. There’s a duration, albeit brief, before its harsh, terminal consonants. Despite that fact, photographs are commonly thought of as moments of frozen time. The camera’s click doesn’t elapse, it just occurs. M.J. Sharp, "Ladybanks Rose Ring"M.J. Sharp’s clicks, however, last for minutes or hours. A selection of her long-exposure photographs at the Craven Allen Gallery in Durham through Feb. 11 in a show entitled Light Cache features meditative images of her home and neighborhood, and nocturnal landscapes both local and distant....

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Monday, November 21, 2011

[Updated] Durham City Council greenlights public art program

Posted By on Mon, Nov 21, 2011 at 1:36 PM

UPDATED: 10:48pm Monday, Nov. 21.File photo by D.L. AndersonJaume Plensa's light sculpture "Sleep No More," at its unveiling in December 2008.DURHAM—The Bull City is finally taking the public art plunge. The Durham City Council passed a resolution Monday night to devote up to one percent of the proposed General Capital Improvement Project (CIP) annual budget to the installation of public art at CIP sites and other locations around the city, including a priority area downtown and along "gateways" to the city. And it's been a long time coming. The percent-for-art program was flagged as a high-priority section of Durham's Cultural...

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Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Drive to Raleigh to see one photograph? Do it.

Posted By on Wed, Nov 9, 2011 at 11:07 AM

“It is not (it seems to me) by painting that photography touches art, but by theater,” Roland Barthes wrote in Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography. The French theorist’s book investigates the relatively young medium through the question of why certain individual images fascinate him. Burk Uzzle's "Red, White, and Blue" (2007)One image at the back of the Burk Uzzle retrospective at Raleigh’s Flanders Gallery through Nov. 29 would likely have been in Barthes’ book. And its complex theatrical power makes it worth a special trip to camp out in front of for a half-hour pondering where America is, and where...

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Tuesday, October 4, 2011

On absence and presence: Catherine Howard's Veil Tease

Posted By on Tue, Oct 4, 2011 at 7:25 AM

Diaphaneity. When was the last time you encountered that word? Perhaps never. But you likely embody it almost at all times. Photo by Chris VitielloA view of the hanging banner paintings in Catherine Howard's "Veil Tease." at the Carrack Modern Art Gallery through Oct. 12.Catherine Howard's "Veil Tease," an installation of 15 free-hanging banner paintings, elaborates the strange human condition of having always to be both a physical and psychological being. These colorful scrolls, some of which flap out the open gallery windows on breezy days, fill the cavity of the Carrack Modern Art Gallery in Durham through Oct. 12....

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Friday, September 2, 2011

Ultraportraiture: Morag Charlton’s new paintings of Facebook profile pictures

Posted By on Fri, Sep 2, 2011 at 6:43 AM

Although it’s not always activated in painting, scale is one of the most interesting aspects of an artifact. Monumental garden sculptures by Henry Moore turn you into a child wandering through the looking glass, while gazing up at Louise Bourgeois’ gigantic maternal spiders can leave you feeling meek or apologetic for the rest of the day. If those were tabletop pieces, your emotional reaction to them would be smaller, if not absent. Courtesy Eno GalleryMorag Charlton's portrait of her daughter Anna's Facebook profile picture: "I absolutely love myself"Morag Charlton uses scale to reveal the complex identities of the subjects of...

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Monday, August 29, 2011

From Sushi Boy Thunder to Ninja Hamster Rescue: Game On Raleigh happens tonight

Posted By on Mon, Aug 29, 2011 at 3:34 PM

The Triangle has proven a home for such large video game companies as Epic Games, but now a new generation of Triangle residents are creating their own games—and are ready to pit them against one another. The first Game On Raleigh will be held tonight at the Busy Bee Café’s Hive in downtown Raleigh from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m., a self-described “Battle of the Bands” for video games that offers Triangle gamers samples of what local developers have to offer. Ten developers, ranging from such veterans as Spark Plug Games to newer groups such as Pangolin Games, will show...

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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Notes on Durham Third Friday, Part 2: Image and idiosyncrasy

Posted By on Wed, Aug 24, 2011 at 9:46 AM

Although summer doesn’t end until the fall equinox in late September, August’s Third Friday in Durham uses the public impatience with the season as a springboard into fall. Tom Elrod already described some of the bounty of visual arts in an earlier post, but that was only the half of it. Lee Delegard's installation "Don't Touch the Ground" is at Golden Belt's Room 100 through Oct. 2.“The Nature of Drawing,” a show of india ink drawings by Ripley Whiteside and paint and graphite compositions by Mary Ann Anderson, opened at the Durham Art Guild's main gallery on the first floor...

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Monday, August 22, 2011

Notes on Durham Third Friday, Part 1: The paranormal and the apocalyptic

Posted By on Mon, Aug 22, 2011 at 11:42 AM

Susan MacWilliam In Durham Friday night at the Stedman Center, Irish artist Susan MacWilliam presented some of her latest work in a lecture entitled “My Adventures in the Supernormal.” She developed her most recent work while in residency the Rhine Research Center in Durham this summer. MacWilliam has been working for more than 10 years on subjects surrounding the “paranormal” and “parapsychology.” Her interest, she says, is not so much the paranormal per se but the people who study it and the many types of apparatus they've created in order to run tests or communicate with the dead. Thus, skepticism...

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Friday, May 27, 2011

Pulping Dixie: Poet Kay Byer and the complexity of race in the South

Posted By on Fri, May 27, 2011 at 11:34 AM

Any writing about race relations in the South will have its limitations. One’s experiences are never comprehensive. One’s skin color and background are hardly choices. In an important way, any individual book, essay, article, or poem about racism and the South aspires primarily to contribute to the totality of literature on the subject, rather than to overcome it. They’re part of an interminable conversation upon an unresolvable issue. And only time determines which books and works count more than others. Former North Carolina Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byer’s new collection Southern Fictions, a series of sonnets coming out of black-white...

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Thursday, March 17, 2011

Jason Whitman’s hapless animals at Rebus Works

Posted By on Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 6:36 PM

Courtesy of Rebus WorksJason Whitman:DrawingsRebus Works Through March Remember that guy in high school who was always drawing? You always wanted to sit in the row next to him so you could peek over during class to see what he was scrawling there, hiding the paper with an arm so the teacher couldn’t see what he was up to. I have a feeling that Jason Whitman was one of those guys. Whitman’s 25 or so pencil drawings currently at Rebus Works in Raleigh still show something of that album-cover, adolescent hand, featuring painstakingly shaded animals under various degrees of ironic...

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First Friday diary

Posted By on Thu, Mar 17, 2011 at 5:38 PM

Photo by Lauren ShuteAt 311 Gallery, Friday night in RaleighAlthough I’ve spent three years in Raleigh, I’d yet to hit downtown for a First Friday. But this month, it was time. My editor asked for a report on the monthly art celebration, and I was more than happy to grab a notepad and some friends and spend a night on the town. My friends and I paired our most chic outfits with our highest heels for First Friday earlier this month, eager to fit in with the Raleigh art set. We sipped white wine and nodded along with the artists,...

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Tuesday, March 15, 2011

(More) cute "a-gnome-ymous" art in D-town

Posted By on Tue, Mar 15, 2011 at 3:34 PM

Cork gnomes are expected to venture out beginning March 20 Spring is in the air. Heaps of little creatures are prepping for debut, from bitty bunnies to budding bulbs and... lucky little cork gnomes, as the Indy staff has learned. The news came in an "a-gnome-ymous" letter of Lilliputian proportion, attached to this little guy (or gal?). Locals will start spotting these little cuties beginning March 20, according to the message. It seems they were inspired in part by last year's garden-gnome spottings across Durham, which were documented on a local blog, as well as here at the Indy website....

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Saturday, February 5, 2011

Positive images: Documenting chemotherapy with archaic photography techniques

Posted By on Sat, Feb 5, 2011 at 10:31 AM

Photo by Willie OstermanChemoToxicAmbrotype photographs by Willie OstermanDurhamThrough This Lens GalleryThrough March 12 “I photograph because I don’t understand something, or I’m curious about something, or want to learn about something,” Willie Osterman says. In the case of cancer, one’s body is what’s not understood, to the specific extent that it becomes an enemy. In CHEMOTOXIC, a show of 27 ambrotypes at Durham’s Through This Lens gallery through March 12, Osterman’s photographs document his wife Michele’s chemotherapy and recovery from cancer, and also draw a new kind of connection between the camera and the body. Michele was diagnosed on Valentine’s...

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Wednesday, October 27, 2010

John Hope Franklin Center Gallery hosts Freedarko basketball art show

Posted By on Wed, Oct 27, 2010 at 11:09 AM

A view of the Freedarko John Hope Franklin Center galleryThe Freedarko collective blog has always taken an intense view of professional basketball and its heroes. Taking the whole of the NBA in their sights, Nathaniel Friedman (under the name Bethlehem Shoals) and his co-writers, sporting such tart nicknames as Dr. Lawyer IndianChief, Silverbird 5000, and Brown Recluse, Esq., bring a fresh, intellectual view of sport, especially the power and cult of personality around The Player. Their first book, The Macrophenomenal Pro Basketball Almanac, deeply explored The Player. Now they have a second book, The Undisputed Guide to Pro Basketball History...

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Friday, February 5, 2010

Discussing SPILL with artist Sarah Spencer White

Posted By on Fri, Feb 5, 2010 at 8:41 AM

SPILL Installation by Sarah Spencer White Golden Belt Arts, Building 3, ROOM 100 Through Feb. 14 It took sculptor and ceramics artist Sarah Spencer White 18 months to hand-craft more than 100 individual pieces of earthenware for an exhibit at the Golden Belt gallery in downtown Durham. White's new installation, SPILL, references past and present handcrafted forms, and explores the shift between industrial and handmade, symbolic of the former Golden Belt's recent past as a functioning factory. SPILL asks us to meditate on what we expect from a vessel. Functionality or dysfunctionality? A sieve or a container? In a Q-and-A...

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Thursday, October 22, 2009

Picasso's Closet: The Independent Interview with Ariel Dorfman

Posted By on Thu, Oct 22, 2009 at 8:11 AM

I spoke with Ariel Dorfman about his play, Picasso’s Closet, for about 45 minutes in his office at the John Hope Franklin Institute at Duke, at midday on Oct. 13, 2009. Nasher Museum of Art will present a staged reading of the play in conjunction with its Picasso and the Allure of Language exhibit, Oct. 29-31, at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at the Duke Box Office website. Independent: This must be a difficult script to produce. Ariel Dorfman: This is an experimental play. Let’s say I’ve tried to do, modestly, in theater with time what Picasso does with...

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Wow. I guess you can't recognize brilliant satire when you see it. This was an amazing performance that if you …

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