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Saturday, June 30, 2012

ADF 2012: Hubbard Street Dance Chicago's machineries of memory and fantasy

Posted By on Sat, Jun 30, 2012 at 2:44 PM

Hubbard Street Dance Chicago : Quintett - Images by Independent Weekly DURHAM/ DPAC—Hubbard Street Dance Chicago performed a long program in the Durham Performing Arts Center last night for the American Dance Festival: three pieces and two full intermissions, which they’ll reprise tonight. Each of the dances—created by 2012 Scripps/ADF Awardee William Forsythe, Hubbard Street resident choreographer Alejandro Cerrudo and Israeli choreographers Sharon Eyal and Gaï Behar—could have stood alone on its own. Each certainly contains an evening’s worth of content, but the evening doesn’t suffer in the least from that. Rather, it demonstrates the central characteristic of this repertory...

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Friday, June 29, 2012

A stud is born: Steven Soderbergh's Magic Mike is stately

Posted By on Fri, Jun 29, 2012 at 1:26 PM

Photo by Claudette Barius/ Warner BrosMatthew McConaughey shows what long, tedious hours in the gym can do.MAGIC MIKE*** starsOpens today “This is not a joke!” shouts a bare-chested, protective goggle-wearing Dallas as he holds a lit torch on the stage of Xquisite, a male strip club. Well, Dallas might not be joking, but thanks in part to the actor playing him (Matthew McConaughey), Steven Soderbergh’s Magic Mike is pretty funny. It’s also well-paced, a lot smarter than it has to be and expertly directed. Mush-mouthed Channing Tatum plays Mike, a personable hunk who takes off his clothes for money. Tatum’s...

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Tuesday, June 26, 2012

DVD+Digital: The quiet brilliance of The Artist

Posted By on Tue, Jun 26, 2012 at 1:56 PM

courtesy of the Weinstein Company It all seems a little too cute, doesn't it? THE ARTIST is a black-and-white silent film, shot in the archaic 4:3 aspect ratio, about the Old Hollywood silent film era. And it's French! And it won the Best Picture Oscar! I was skeptical, too—this seemed like the sort of artsy, delightfully impertinent gesture the Academy likes to make every few years. But I was wrong. The Artist is a pure delight from beginning to end; a genuinely inspired piece of popular entertainment with bonus resonance for movie history geeks. (Read Laura Boyes's review for the...

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Friday, June 22, 2012

Boneshaker author Cherie Priest talks steampunk at ConTemporal in Chapel Hill

Posted By on Fri, Jun 22, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Photo by Libby BulloffCherie PriestWhy should you head to ConTemporal, the Chapel Hill-based science fiction convention that focuses heavily on the retro-futuristic concept of steampunk? We’ll let the con’s literary guest of honor Cherie Priest tell you why. Steampunk, for those not in the know, is a branch of science fiction that postulates what would have happened if modern or futuristic technology had been created in the past, using the technology and materials available at that time, e.g. steam engines, zeppelins and the like. It’s become a particularly popular subset of science fiction fandom, with many fans creating steampunk-themed outfits...

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Thursday, June 21, 2012

Coming of age in the era of Marilyn, Eisenhower and the Beats in 1*9*5*6 Degrees of Separation

Posted By on Thu, Jun 21, 2012 at 5:18 PM

Photos by Eric WatersGlenn Gould (Matthew Young), Grace Kelly (Elisabeth Johnson) and Allen Ginsberg (Derrick Ivey)1*9*5*6 Degrees of SeparationOther Voices@ Manbites Dog TheaterThrough June 24 All art is to some degree autobiographical. Any creation tells us something about its creator. But some art is more explicit, depicting or revealing the artist as she sees herself, or in the case of Killian Manning’s new work, exploring the milieu that shaped her. Manning was born in 1956; she is 56 this year. Her age makes looking back and taking stock almost inevitable, and the numerology makes the undertaking feel cosmic and lucky....

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Tuesday, June 19, 2012

DVD+Digital: The comic genius of Louis C.K.

Posted By on Tue, Jun 19, 2012 at 11:48 AM

Courtesy of FX Too much good TV, that's the problem. It's impossible to keep up with all the quality series on television these days – Mad Men, True Blood, Boardwalk Empire, The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones, Homeland, Girls. Well, not impossible, but certainly tricky, and you have to give up things like family and daylight. One show I never miss, though, is LOUIE, the verite-style situation comedy from veteran alt-comic Louis C.K. Season two of the hit FX show is out this week on DVD and Blu-ray, and it's a good opportunity to catch up with this genre-busting endeavor....

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Thursday, June 14, 2012

2012 ADF Season Honoree Mary Regan: The Independent Interview

Posted By on Thu, Jun 14, 2012 at 3:00 PM

NC Arts Council2012 ADF Season Honoree Mary ReganThe American Dance Festival is dedicating its 2012 season to long-time supporter Mary Regan. At its opening gala on June 14, ADF Director Jodee Nimerichter noted, "Her incredible leadership of the North Carolina Arts Council transformed North Carolina into a place where art matters and thrives. Her years of innovative programming enriched North Carolina’s diverse and dynamic arts community and touched lives throughout the state and beyond." In February of this year, Regan retired after 39 years with the North Carolina Arts Council—36 of them as its executive director. On March 2, just...

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Tuesday, June 12, 2012

DVD+Digital: Suicide solutions as Harold and Maude gets the Criterion treatment

Posted By on Tue, Jun 12, 2012 at 10:30 AM

Paramount Pictures The original indie quirk movie, director Hal Ashby's HAROLD AND MAUDE has been re-issued this week on DVD and Blu-ray by the Criterion Collection, whose boutique home video releases are little artifacts of film goodness in and of themselves. The special edition features new digital restoration, a remastered soundtrack and a booklet of archival interviews and essays. Watching the movie again for the first time in 20 years, I must admit my first thought was, “Hey! Wes Anderson made a movie in 1971!” Anderson has long acknowledged Ashby as an influence, but the connection is never more conspicuous...

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Friday, June 8, 2012

O Canada: Richard Ford's new novel is quietly riveting

Posted By on Fri, Jun 8, 2012 at 11:19 AM

Photo by Laura WilsonCANADAby Richard FordEcco; 420 pp. In Jim Jarmusch’s film Coffee and Cigarettes, Iggy Pop and Tom Waits discuss how great it’s been to quit smoking and then commence to light up; the joke is that it’s OK for them to have one now, because they don’t smoke. This deceptive notion that we can separate who we are from what we do is darkly dramatized in Canada, the quietly riveting new novel by prominent American writer Richard Ford. At what point does a decent person bending the law become a criminal? The elusiveness of the threshold accounts for...

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Thursday, June 7, 2012

It's wrestling, but is it art? Food trucks and smackdowns tonight in Raleigh

Posted By on Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 1:24 PM

Shonna GreenwellA superstar from the late ’90s Southern Championship Wrestling sceneThere’s art to be found in men beating the crap out of each other. There is also wholesome, family entertainment located there too. Just ask Rebus Works owner Shonna Greenwell. Today, the men of local wrestling outfit GOUGE Wrestling will be smashing and bashing outside her arts and crafts gallery, entertaining spectators as they take part in another one of Rebus Works’s Food Truck Rodeo. So, just how did an art gallery owner hook up with a bunch of tights-wearing bruisers? Well, for starters, she lived next to one for...

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On reading, but not quite meeting, Ray Bradbury

Posted By on Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 12:41 PM

In a way, I'll always regret that I never got a chance to tell Ray Bradbury what his work meant to my life. On the other hand, the reason I never got to do this was that the lines to meet him were always too long. A rather bizarre Sunkist commercial from the 1960s where Bradbury (sort of) helps sell prunes. There's not a lot of tragedy one can find in an author passing away at 91, particularly one who whose passing inspired tributes from no less than Barack Obama. One of the last stories I read by Bradbury was...

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Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Love never dies, but many terrible musicals have: Sitting through Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom sequel.

Posted By on Wed, Jun 6, 2012 at 4:12 PM

This past Christmas, I received two books on the history of Broadway flops, Not Since Carrie and Second Act Trouble. They’re fascinating reads, both illuminating some hidden treasures of the theater and in recounting the brazen excesses that doom many a Broadway flop to its fate. A review of the adaptation of Carrie, the musical version of Stephen King’s classic revenge story, which inspired the title of Not Since Carrie. A recent revival dumped the camp and was excoriated for NOT providing the insane spectacle the audience anticipated. This is on my mind when I recently attended a Fathom Events...

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Tuesday, June 5, 2012

DVD+Digital: Machine Gun Preacher and Curb Your Enthusiasm

Posted By on Tue, Jun 5, 2012 at 10:14 AM

20th Century Fox Home Entertainment One of the great joys of home video is inducing cognitive dissonance by scheduling an ambitious double feature night. Pick the right two films, and you can work alchemical wonders in your own mind. I was once talked into a Halloween double feature bill of Monsters, Inc. and The Exorcist. My dreams that night put me on medication for the next three years. Still, it's good fun. This week's Cognitive Dissonance Double Feature begins with MACHINE GUN PREACHER, among the stranger movies to see semi-wide theatrical release last year. Despite the title, this is no...

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Friday, June 1, 2012

Last weekend in review: No Shame Theatre in Carrboro

Posted By on Fri, Jun 1, 2012 at 6:01 PM

YouTubeToby Huss' character of Artie ,the Strongest Man in the World, was created in a No Shame performance.It’s almost 10 p.m. on a recent Saturday night at the Carrboro ArtsCenter, and people are scattered in the lobby rehearsing their scripts. They’ll have them to refer to for their coming performances, but they still want to get them right. Most of the performers just got the scripts that day; in some cases, the scripts might not even have been written until a few hours ago. What has brought them out tonight? It’s the monthly gathering of No Shame Theatre a performance...

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Interaction without ego: sarah goetz's Just Between Us opens at Durham's Carrack Gallery

Posted By on Fri, Jun 1, 2012 at 10:48 AM

The circle and the square. This phrase recalls Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man notebook drawing, in which he exemplifies the proportional relationship that the Roman architect Vitruvius asserted as optimally connecting man to the structures around him. Photo by Chris Vitiello"by how to each other we hold" (2012), suspended paper installation, sarah goetzDurham artist sarah goetz also uses circles and squares to foster connections in her multimedia installation Just Between Us, now on view at the Carrack Modern Art Gallery through June 7. For goetz, however, the connections are not architectural but aspire to be interpersonal. It would be difficult...

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Instead of luxury apartments(AHEM Carborro) and new restaurants, build more parking?!(Just one parking garage would help a lot, cover it …

by ammi on The Bookshop Brought Many Rare and First Editions—and Two Famous Cats—to Franklin Street for Thirty-Two Years (Arts)

WELCOME TO THE GREAT BROTHERHOOD.
Do you want to be a member of Illuminati as a brotherhood that will make …

by peter bello on Movie Review: A Dog's Purpose Rolls Over and Plays Dead Under Its Own Heart-Tugging Weight (Arts)

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