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Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Mastodon, Clutch to co-headline outdoor show at Lincoln Theatre May 9

Posted by on Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 12:00 PM

Mastodon: Get a bigger tour vehicle, guys
  • Travis Shinn
  • Mastodon: Get a bigger tour vehicle, guys

In September, Atlanta metal act Mastodon headlined Hopscotch with a fantastic City Plaza set. Like a goofy Southern version of Metallica, their balance between radio-ready accessibility and pummeling crunch was a proper fit—celebratory and loud, like a headliner should be. Sure, there were more "metal" bands on the fest, but the Mastodon set was a good time, and that's all it needed to be.

They're coming back soon to play only a block away. On May 9, Lincoln Theatre kicks off the outdoor music season with a show co-headlined by Mastodon and Clutch, with Sweden's Graveyard opening. Tickets go on sale Friday. Considering how recently they were in town—and considering The Ritz's upcoming reopening on Thursday as a Live Nation venue—we caught up with Lincoln booking agent Chris Malarkey to see if there was any correlation.

INDY Week: Are these street shows part of the way you're competing with having The Ritz back in town and recharged?

Chris Malarkey: I don't know why it would. It's just a show I've been trying to get for awhile. I'm a big fan of Mastodon. I'm a big fan of Clutch. We couldn't get Mastodon last year, because they ended up at Hopscotch, so they're coming around. We decided to jump on it.

Was the plan even last year to do it on the street?

We've done concerts out on the street. We do a couple a year. Sometimes it's a little too big to put in here, you know? Where else are we going to put them? It's easier for us to do it with our infrastructure and do it all in-house out on the street in front of the Lincoln.

You've had Clutch before, and Clutch you've done inside.

Clutch we've done several times. Last time they played, they did a two-nighter and sold out both nights. We actually did the same exact bill, Clutch and Mastodon, back in 2003. Mastodon was a fairly newer band supporting Clutch. We did that show here, and we also put something on down in Wilmington. So we have a history with both of those bands.

Last year were you already in talks with them when the Hopscotch announcement came out?

No. We had just poked around, and the agent told us their plans to play on Hopscotch, so we let it go. We didn't really pursue them this year since they played Hopscotch last year. This package happened to be coming around. I talk to the agent probably every couple of months about Clutch, because Clutch is one of my favorites. They usually come through every two years, and it had been two years. It was time for them to come, and it just happened they were on this bill. We put two and two together and had to put it out on the street. I can get 5,000 people out there.

What else is coming up in your year at the Lincoln?

Right now, I think I've got six or seven sell-outs on the books. I think it's going to be a pretty good year.


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Monday, May 5, 2014

crowdsource, the new multimedia project from Baobab's Phil Torres

Posted by on Mon, May 5, 2014 at 5:42 PM


In Baobab, Phil Torres constructed elaborate pop songs that suggested both the chaos and rigid order of an active mind. With that project on hiatus, Torres has started a new, performance-oriented solo act. Now, as crowdsource, Torres manipulates audio and video streams, mixing between the two to create an experience specific to each event. July will see a crowdsource EP on Hush Hush Records; in the meantime, he opens for England's NYPC—that's the former New Young Pony Club—at Kings in Raleigh May 6.

“The video can respond in real-time to the audio, the audio to the video, and both to the audience,” he says. “There are so many audio-visual options here that it would be impossible to recreate any series of mixing events after they happen.”

Last summer, near Baobab’s end, crowdsource emerged as Torres’ focus shifted from traditional live music to “projection events." Typically unannounced, these sets featured Torres setting up in a busy urban area and projecting his short films against abandoned buildings while playing his music. Torres would ask to borrow a business' power, defusing some of the potential for guerrilla art controversy. 

“I never had any issues with police or anyone else,” he says. Some officers asked what he was doing, watched for a while, and moved on, he says. Reactions from incidental spectators came split between apathy, he says, and excitement. Sometimes, his impromptu audiences even encouraged him to restart the show.

“My aim was explicitly not to cause any kind of disturbance of the peace," Torres says. "I wanted these events to foster community rather than upset it.”


crowdsource plays Kings Tuesday, May 6.
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    Exploring crowdsource, the site-specific origins of the new band featuring former Baobab leader Phil Torres

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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Indigo Girls, Des Ark, Del McCoury, and dozens other to play Shakori Hills April 17-20

Posted by on Tue, Mar 11, 2014 at 4:12 PM


The original DMB: The Del McCoury Band plays Shakori Hills this April

  • The original DMB: The Del McCoury Band plays Shakori Hills this April



For such a massive festival, Shakori Hills Grassroots Festival—the four-day weekend of music and mud on a 72-acre site just north of Pittsboro—doesn't worry with big announcements. On Sunday, the festival created and posted its official Facebook event. The lineup, too, just went live, and features what's come to be expected from this fest in its 11th year: lots of roots and Americana, a sampling of worthy locals, a handful of noteworthy or even legendary "they got who?" acts, and enough unknown quantities to reward a little curiosity.



Headlining this year are Indigo Girls, Del McCoury Band, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, and Donna the Buffalo (though that last is a fixture and should be no surprise to Shakori regulars). Considering Indigo Girl Amy Ray played a string of shows with Mount Moriah's Heather McEntire earlier this year, there may be an extra-strong local connection with that set. As the multi-decade bluegrass veteran headlining a rural grassroots festival, McCoury's set seems an obvious highlight, especially given the success of Raleigh's inaugural IBMA weekend last year.



What multi-faceted avant folk-rock powerhouse Des Ark, led by Chatham County songwriter Aimée Argote, will sound like is anyone's guess, as the act is even now putting the finishing touches on what promises to be a curveball of an LP: Argote's said the new sound privileges quiet, sad textures and different instrumentation. Throughout the lineup, there are familiar, welcome local names - Morning Brigade, Diali Cissokho, Toon & the Real Laww - and unknowns aplenty. Like any lineup, curiosity is often rewarded. So why not scan the lineup for yourself?



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    Quietly, Shakori Hills announces a stellar lineup.

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Thursday, February 20, 2014

Terry Bozzio-lympics: Virtuoso drummer plays Raleigh Monday

Posted by on Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 9:58 AM

Terry Bozzio and his drums - all his drums
  • Terry Bozzio and his drums - all his drums
This coming Monday at 7:30 p.m., Terry Bozzio—originally Zappa's drummer, now a soloist with a distinctly maximalist approach—brings his drum clinic to the Pour House in Raleigh. And while some may roll eyes at his virtuosic flurry of sticks and kicks, one thing is undeniable: Holy shit, this guy can drum.

Bozzio's setup
is a thing to behold; he has more bass drums than most drummers have pieces in their kit, not to mention dozens of toms, snares and various other percussion bits precisely tuned to various tones. This absurd kit could easily take up the entirety of the Pour House stage and, particularly from behind, it has all the appearances of some elaborate sci-fi control mechanism.

The draw here is similar to that of the Olympics, though, as the spectacle at hand is one of a super-specialized virtuoso in peak physical condition for the task at hand. What's the practical use of jumping hundreds of feet in the air on skis? And what's the point of shooting down an ice tunnel at 90 miles an hour on little more than a cafeteria tray? Like the Olympics, this is all perfectly ridiculous: Bozzio's kit is incredibly impractical and nobody but him can even play it—not without years of intensive training, that is. Bozzio's drumming has more to do with his dizzying abilities than whether or not they'd be useful or even practical to everyday musicians.

This is the same draw that's had untold numbers of people, worldwide, tuned in to the Sochi games—or any year's Olympics, for that matter. Enjoyment of either requires a healthy suspension of disbelief and an admission that the skills on display are, frankly, not all that useful.

So if you haven't had enough of superhuman feats, go see Bozzio at the Pour House the day after the Olympics end. If that's not your scene, though—well, you don't need me to tell you that.


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    Zappa's former drummer brings his superhuman and somewhat useless kit and skill set to a demonstration at The Pour House on Monday.

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Friday, December 13, 2013

WKNC Double Barrel announces 2014 headliners, sends one night to Carrboro

Posted by on Fri, Dec 13, 2013 at 1:46 PM


WKNC.png
88.1 WKNC may be the college radio station for N.C. State University, but its signal is powerful enough to reach past Raleigh to most every point in the Triangle. This February, the station will try to leverage this broad territory, stretching its annual Double Barrel Benefit into two weekends in two different cities. On Feb. 7, The Love Language will headline the first show at Carrboro’s Cat’s Cradle. One week later, Mount Moriah will lead the second night, which hits the Lincoln Theatre in downtown Raleigh.

The booking is solid. The Love Language’s recent live shows have transformed their anxious pop into a ragged psych-rock surge. Mount Moriah, fresh off this year’s sterling Miracle Temple, liven their elegant folk-rock with a fiery choogle onstage. 

But sending one night of this annual Oak City hullabaloo across the Triangle is a risky proposition: All of the previous 10 Double Barrels have taken place on adjacent Fridays and Saturdays at one of two smaller rock clubs in Raleigh — Kings Barcade and The Pour House, which both hold about 250. The Cradle can admit 750. The Lincoln has room for 800. Filling these bigger rooms, especially far away from WKNC's home base, could prove difficult. While events stretching across the Triangle aren't unheard of (early iterations of Durham’s defunct Troika Music Festival dotted shows all over the area), WKNC will depend on some Interstate 40 travel to make this work. 

There’s also the issue of stepping on rival toes: Carrboro already has a local college radio station, UNC-Chapel Hill’s 89.3 WXYC, and they present frequent and successful events, such as the Backyard Barbecue and the 80s Dance.

But WKNC’s gamble could also pay off, raking in additional funds and cementing their reputation as the Triangle’s most popular college radio station. We’ll find out in February.

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Friday, October 11, 2013

Thanks to Rolling Rock (?), Tyvek plays Flanders Gallery in Raleigh tonight

Posted by on Fri, Oct 11, 2013 at 10:48 AM

rolling_rock.jpg

If you ask Nate Scudieri, the brand director for Rolling Rock Extra Pale Ale, he'll tell you that his beer and Tyvek have a lot in common: Tyvek are the restless garage band that will play Friday’s “Project 33,” a Rolling Rock-sponsored art show at Flanders Gallery in Raleigh. Rolling Rock is an affordable brew that got its starts in Western Pennsylvania in 1939. Tyvek offer a confounding range of sounds, shifting from unfettered punk tantrums to knotty post-rock brambles, typically mutating a few times on every LP. Rolling Rock is a potable liquid with a slightly metallic taste, dulled by barbed-wire hops. Despite these differences, Scudieri thinks the two are united by their “independent spirit.”

“They’re up and coming, slowly getting a lot of notoriety,” says Scudieri, who, like Tyvek, hails from Detroit. “Over the years, they’ve evolved, but, like Rolling Rock, they’ve always been true to who they are. Years ago they were a three-piece band. Then they were a seven-piece band, and now they’re a four-piece band. But the important thing again is that they, like Rolling Rock, have always done things on their own terms and done things their way. We respect that kind of passion and resilience and being authentic.”

Scudieri also says Tyvek are fans of Rolling Rock.

“Project 33” strives to celebrate their shared spirit with a mural created by Raleigh artist Derek Toomes and a selection of 100 photos submitted to doingourthing.com, a site that Rolling Rock created to capture the top-flight shots that were accumulating on their Facebook page. It seems that Rolling Rock and Tyvek also share their independent spirit with the “billion roaming photojournalists” with a smartphone and a two-year contract.

The event kicks off at 6 p.m. and is free to anyone who sends a Facebook-message RSVP to Rolling Rock—so long as you’re above the age of 21. Rumor has it that Tyvek won’t go on until 8 p.m., but organizers have yet to confirm that. There goes that independent spirit again, preventing them from pinning down exact details. 


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Tuesday, September 3, 2013

NC Music Love Army to release LP at Cat's Cradle in November

Posted by on Tue, Sep 3, 2013 at 9:49 AM

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On Labor Day, the "Moral Monday" protesters that spent the summer raising their voices against the state's Republican-dominated legislature reaffirmed their stance, decrying lawmakers who will vote Tuesday tooverturn a pair of vetoes by Gov. Pat McCrory—one on a bill requiring drug testing for welfare recipients, the other on a measure that expands the definition of "seasonal labor." They haven't forgotten their cause, and neither have the NC Music Love Army, the loose but impassioned contingent of area musicians who spent their summer soundtracking the "Moral Monday" movement. When they started up in July, they promised an LP of protest songs and a large-scale concert. They'll keep to both promises on Nov. 30 when the Army takes to the Cat's Cradle stage in Carrboro to celebrate the album's release.

Having performed at Moral Mondays and at a couple of club shows across the Triangle, the Love Army's LP will include a few songs that truly captured the spirit of this summer's protests. "We Are Not For Sale"—composed by The Old Ceremony's Django Haskins—decries the role of money and greed in N.C. politics, while "Is This Here What Jesus Would Do?"—written by Charlotte's Jon Lindsay—skewers the separation between lawmakers' church-going beliefs and their uncaring attitude toward the state's poor and marginalized peoples. Songs like these get after essential issues that could keep them relevant long after these protests have faded into history. In any case, they certainly ring true in the here and now.

All proceeds from NCMLA activity still go to the NAACP, Progress NC, and Planned Parenthood. For more info, including details on time and tickets, stay tuned to the Cat's Cradle's website as well as ncmusiclovearmy.tumblr.com.


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    When they started up in July, NCMLA promised an LP of protest songs and a large-scale concert. They'll keep to both promises on Nov. 30.

Monday, August 12, 2013

Yep Roc's Kim Richey and Josh Rouse to play Hillsborough's Fresh Roots Festival

Posted by on Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Last year, the Downtown Merchants of Historic Hillsborough hatched a fun idea to draw a crowd to the quiet town to enjoy the comfortable fall weather and drop some cash at local establishments. The first Fresh Roots Festival took place at the end of October and included art shows, author discussions, restaurant specials and even a Hand Made Parade. It also sported a folk-heavy slate of local, regional and national musicians performing on the Courthouse lawn.


The festival is back this year, taking over downtown on Saturday, Sept. 28, with a similar array of charming, family-friendly diversions. They're also upping the musical ante, teaming with Yep Roc Records, the folk and rock haven based in Hillsborough, who are providing Kim Richey and Josh Rouse, two standouts from their impressive songwriting stable, as the backbone for this year's performance schedule.


The two nationally known singers elevate the festival's musical standing without pushing it outside of its folk-rock wheelhouse. The country-leaning Richey has been at it for almost 20 years, netting a Grammy nomination and producing a strong catalog characterized by direct emotions and stalwart melodies. Her full and fetching 2013 LP, Thorn in My Heart, proves that she hasn't lost her touch. Rouse's detail-rich narratives ramble down moody pop and rock back roads, and they've never moved more confidently than they do on his recently released album, The Happiness Waltz.


As with last year, the free performance takes place on the Courthouse lawn. The festival goes from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. with the main musical presentation scheduled for 2 to 6 p.m. For more information, visit www.freshrootsfestivals.org.



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    In its second year, Hillsborough's Fresh Roots Festival is upping the musical ante on Saturday, Sept. 28.

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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Deerhunter to play impromptu set in Durham tonight

Posted by on Tue, Apr 23, 2013 at 10:02 AM

You may well be too late, but Atlanta-based psych-rock outfit Deerhunter is playing an intimate, un-publicized set in Durham tonight. The show is happening at the show at the Carrack (111 W. Parrish St.). Entry is only available via RSVP. As of about 9 a.m., there were 50 spots available. Shoot a message to durtydurham@gmail.com if you're interested in securing one.

Deerhunter — which rides the ever-wandering whims of Bradford Cox, also the man behind Atlas Sound — has become a critical darling and fan favorite these past few years, grafting tender and graceful psych textures onto garage rock momentum, mixing and re-mixing the constituent elements with increasingly diverse results. The band's new album, Monomania, drops on May 7. Jackson Scott and Mas Ysa will provide support at the 9 p.m. show. Tickets are $8 with an RSVP. There may be a few tickets released at the door, but I really wouldn't risk it. No RSVPs will be accepted after 5 p.m.

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    Entry is only available via RSVP.

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Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Durham's Golden Belt unveils free, outdoor concert series

Posted by on Wed, Apr 17, 2013 at 12:56 PM

If you live in Durham, and you don't see a free, outdoor concert this summer, you'll only have yourself to blame. Hot on the heels of the recent announcement of the "Find Your Cool" concert series, Golden Belt has unveiled its own string of free shows in the humid air. "GB Live" celebrates the fifth anniversary of the multi-use downtown arts space that—like many of Durham's cooler spots—exists in a renovated industrial space.

The series of five concerts begins on Friday, May 17 and will occupy four other Fridays, concluding on July 19. The programming, which spans an impressive array of genres for such a compact set of shows, does its best to represent the diversity of Durham's music scene. Hammer No More the Fingers, a Bull City favorite thanks to their muscular and buoyant indie rock, play the first date. They will give way to proficient country-rock ensemble Michael Rank and Stag, super-smooth soul singer Kim Arrington, Greensboro-based afro-jazz exploration The Brand New Life, and quirky blues purveyor Justin Johnson backed by the cover-heavy Skinny Bag of Sugar. Again, all of the shows are free and outside at the Golden Belt — unless it rains, in which case the events move inside. Grab some shades and a shirt you won't mind sweating through and enjoy. The full schedule is below:

Hammer No More The Fingers — May 17
Michael Rank and Stag — June 7
Kim Arrington — June 21
The Brand New Life — July 5
Justin Johnson and Skinny Bag Of Sugar — July 19

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    A series of five concerts at Durham's Golden Belt begins Friday, May 17 and will occupy four other Fridays, concluding on July 19.

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