Where we'll be October 22 - 28 | Where we'll be | Indy Week
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Where we'll be October 22 - 28 

DANCE

DRACULA AND THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH | FLETCHER OPERA THEATER, RALEIGH

SATURDAY, OCT. 25­–SUNDAY, OCT. 26

For Halloween fans too sophisticated for slasher flicks and apple-bobbing, highbrow scares can be hard to find. That's why this Carolina Ballet program has become an annual October institution in the Triangle since premiering in 2010. It features theatrical ballet adaptations of two of the scariest gothic tales of all time, Bram Stoker's definitive vampire story Dracula and Edgar Allen Poe's horrific plague parable The Masque of the Red Death. The former was choreographed by Lynne Taylor-Corbett, the latter by Carolina Ballet director Robert Weiss. With inventive staging and live chamber music, it's macabre fun for the whole family, though perhaps not for the littlest ones. It does for Halloween what The Nutcracker does for Christmas, making ballet accessible to people who don't normally go in for tutus and pointe shoes. 8 p.m. Sat.; 2 p.m. Sat. and Sun., $30.14­­–$68.14, 2 E. South St., 919-996-8700, www.carolinaballet.com. —Brian Howe


MUSIC

click to enlarge Sharon Van Etten - PHOTO BY DUSDIN CONDREN
  • Photo by Dusdin Condren
  • Sharon Van Etten

SHARON VAN ETTEN | CAT'S CRADLE, CARRBORO | THURSDAY, OCT. 23

Sharon Van Etten first arrived as a mildly timid singer-songwriter, delivering confessionals from behind a guitar. Over the course of her first three records, though, she built the confidence to make her songs into something more. Tramp, her 2012 breakthrough, put a chamber rock band behind her plainspoken fare, but the new Are We There finds her pushing into bold new directions. "Our Love" bounces to a thick electronic beat, making it the kind of slow jam you wish you could've awkwardly danced to at your high school prom. "Nothing Will Change" shuffles alongside woodwinds that creep and crawl through the mix. Are We There says a lot about the subject of love—nearly a third of the 11 tracks have the word in their title—but Van Etten is capable of mixing the pleasure with the pain and rendering the two simultaneously, as she does during "I Love You But I'm Lost" and "Your Love is Killing Me." The latter feels like a set of slow, rolling punches to the gut, each one harder than the last. After six minutes, the salvo leaves you breathless. New Zealand's Tiny Ruins opens. 9 p.m., $15–$17, 300 E. Main St., 919-967-9053, www.catscradle.com. —Allison Hussey


Secret Chiefs 3 - PHOTO BY OLIVIA OYAMA
  • PHOTO BY OLIVIA OYAMA
  • Secret Chiefs 3

SECRET CHIEFS 3 | KINGS, RALEIGH | SATURDAY, OCT. 25

Secret Chiefs 3 is the long-running rock concern of Trey Spruance, an original member of those original bastards of heavy exotica, Mr. Bungle. More than a band, though, Secret Chiefs 3 suggests the complexity of a videogame or a Tolkien-like universe, where mere rock songs led by horns and strings reveal subplots and subtleties, trapped in a self-contained world with its own logic and rules. There have been a few dozen members, for instance, and Secret Chiefs 3 functions as the composite of seven distinct bands, each contributing tracks to the same record. Such willful, ornate design radiates throughout the music, too, which laces elements of Middle Eastern, Klezmer and European classical sounds through a composite core of heavy metal bravado and post-rock drama. Secret Chiefs 3, who perform in cloaks emblazoned with sigils, remain a wonderful rejoinder to an era of instant information overload: Even beneath the full glow of stage lights, they are infamously abstruse, thriving in a perfect shadow of the unknown and the unknowable. Atomic Ape, an associate of Secret Chiefs 3's own wide world, opens, along with Raleigh's Savage Knights. 9 p.m., $12–$14, 14 W. Martin St., 919-833-1091, kingsbarcade.com. —Grayson Haver Currin


Los Lobos - PHOTO COURTESY OF DUKE PERFORMANCES
  • PHOTO COURTESY OF DUKE PERFORMANCES
  • Los Lobos

LOS LOBOS | CAROLINA THEATRE, DURHAM | FRIDAY, OCT. 24

Few acts have sustained their talent and invention for 40 years like Los Lobos. The East Los Angeles quintet first broke through critically in 1984 with the eclectic How Will the Wolf Survive, which cut between rock and country-blues, Norteño and R&B. Four years later, they scored a huge commercial hit with a cover of Ritchie Valens' "La Bamba." The hangover of that hit helped galvanized their explorative, experimental side. Though they've been articulate spokesmen for the Mexican-American experience, it's a mistake to focus on ethnicity. As with their R&B mea culpa "Little Things" and the funky "Is This All There Is?," Los Lobos speak more to the sentiments uniting us than the differences that separate us. Tonight, they're playing their 1988 Mexican folk-themed La Pistola y El Corazón in its entirety. 8 p.m., $47–$73.50, 309 W. Morgan St., 919-684-4444, dukeperformances.duke.edu. —Chris Parker


FILM

A REEL-LY SCARY CARY

KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE, CARY

THURSDAY, OCT. 23–SATURDAY, OCT. 25

Remember back in the day (well, a few years ago) when Koka Booth's Halloween-themed "A Reel-ly Scary Cary" film series lasted a whole week? These days, they've got it down to three spook-tacular nights: A classic scary movie on Thursday (the 1989 adaptation of Stephen King's Pet Sematary), a not-so-scary kiddie movie on Friday (Monsters, Inc. sequel Monsters University) and a contemporary scary movie on Saturday (2013's acclaimed hit The Conjuring). It may be just a trio of films, but these flicks will give attendees proper nightmares. And if the movies don't give you a jolt, there's also the haunted house, open from 6 to 10 p.m. on Thursday and 6 to 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. 8 p.m., $10, 8003 Regency Pkwy., 919-462-2025, www.boothamphitheatre.com. —Craig D. Lindsey


THEATER

TREATBAG

DURHAM FRUIT COMPANY, DURHAM | FRIDAY, OCT. 31

click to enlarge halloweenghost.jpg

Take your average haunted house. Add the interactive vibe of New York's famous immersive theater piece, Sleep No More, and the edgy, over-the-top aesthetics of Durham's Little Green Pig theater group. Serve in a creepy, non-traditional performance space, with drinks for the survivors. That's the recipe for this one-night-only theatrical and literary upgrade to the conventional haunted house experience that's become a fall hallmark in Durham. Though details are always hard to come by, this year's edition includes riffs on Grand Guignol, Titus Andronicus and playwright Martin McDonagh, with sequences written by locals Richard Butler and Shelby Hahn. With no linear sequence to the events, audiences can drop in—or out—at any time between 8 and 10 p.m. As with Sleep No More, artistic director Jaybird O'Berski notes that "people can go wherever they want and linger where they see fit." Until something happens, that is. 8–10 p.m., $10, 305 S. Dillard St., 919-452-2304, www.littlegreenpig.com. Byron Woods

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