Where computers go to die | EarthTalk | Indy Week
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Donate your electronic waste to a charity or needy school, or take it to an electronics recycler.

Where computers go to die 

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Q: I work for an office equipment company selling copiers, fax machines, computers and printers. Each year new models come out, making old ones obsolete. As a result, we have loads of trade-ins with nowhere to go. What can we do with this old equipment?

A: Electronic waste, or "e-waste" as it's called, is a growing problem in the United States and abroad as obsolete or broken computers and other electronic equipment are taking up increasingly precious amounts of landfill space and potentially leaking hazardous substances into surrounding ecosystems.

The nonprofit Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition reports that 70 percent of the heavy metals in U.S. landfills are from discarded electronics—even though the e-waste itself accounts for only 2 percent of the trash by volume. The Environmental Protection Agency reports that Americans trash 2 million tons of unwanted electronics each year—six times the amount they recycle. To make matters worse, U.S. companies often ship old equipment to poor nations whose landfills and incinerators are ill equipped, subjecting already struggling populations to lead, cadmium, beryllium and other contaminants.

If your old units still work but have merely been eclipsed by newer models, then by all means donate them to a needy cause that will either put them to good use or resell them to help fund its programs. You'll earn a tax deduction for a charitable donation and, by keeping the equipment alive, prevent the manufacture of new units and thus, if ever so slightly, reduce the footprint of your operations.

But not every charity accepts old equipment, and no one wants to spend all day calling around to find one that does. A good place to look is Goodwill, which will accept your equipment and then sell it through any one of its 1,500 retail stores across the country. The Salvation Army runs similar programs and also typically accepts donated old office equipment.

Another option is to donate your equipment to needy schools, either directly or via a service like iLoveSchools.com, which helps teachers find free supplies and equipment for their classrooms. The National Cristina Foundation also matches donated technology with needy schools and nonprofits, and the Web site GreatNonprofits.org maintains a list of charities in need of various types of office equipment. You can also offload equipment via Freecycle, a free service that helps find homes for unwanted stuff.

Recyclers harvest parts from old equipment that can be reused or resold. Several Web sites, including My Green Electronics, E-cycling Central and Earth911, list electronics recyclers across the U.S. Some of these vendors will charge a small fee to recycle an item for you; others may do it for free. Also, Office Depot, Staples and some other stores will take back used electronics—even if not purchased there—usually for a small fee.

EarthTalk® is from the editors of E/The Environmental Magazine. Send your environmental questions to: EarthTalk®, P.O. Box 5098, Westport, CT 06881; earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php. EarthTalk® is now a book. Details and order information at: www.emagazine.com/earthtalkbook.

  • Donate your electronic waste to a charity or needy school, or take it to an electronics recycler.

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