Urban Archaeology: "Is there a Santa Claus?" | Urban Archaeology | Indy Week
Pin It

Urban Archaeology: "Is there a Santa Claus?" 

summerguide_urbanarch_santa.jpg

Alert: spoiler ahead.

In the winter of 1970, I was sitting with several of my fellow students at the yellow duck table, I believe, in Miss Ludwig's afternoon kindergarten class, when the subject of Santa's existence came up. My mother was volunteering that day.

A classmate at the table, whom I can't remember (but his last name probably ended with S, which narrows it down to a kid named Tony, who was a nihilist even at 5, and later may have done time), announced: "There is not a Santa Claus."

Jeri Smith, a petite girl with silky, straight brown hair, her big blue eyes watering with rage and confusion, replied: "There is too a Santa Claus!"

I whispered to my mother, "Is there a Santa Claus?"

Now, my mother has never been one to sugarcoat the truth—she told me, accurately, that I have a terrible singing voice. But she has shown compassion for others: "There is no Santa Claus, but don't tell Jeri."

I remembered this incident last week when I found this in the grass on West Chapel Hill Street, across from the bus station. Let's hope Santa isn't lactose intolerant.

  • The Urban Archaeology column documents life in the Triangle through found objects, photos and other ephemera.

Latest in Urban Archaeology

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Urban Archaeology



Twitter Activity

Most Recent Comments

I saw the full pamphlet that included this in a laundromat; it is from the Jehovah's witnesses, and it actually …

by RichFNJames on Where we come from (Urban Archaeology)

Wow, how sweet to see this in the Indy!

When Arabella was two years old she said that she …

by Lauren C. K. Goslin on Mrs. Lauren, you are loved (Urban Archaeology)

Cute!

by Arthur B Raleigh on Mrs. Lauren, you are loved (Urban Archaeology)

Lisa Sorg is my favorite columnist of all time

by Anthony Corriveau on Fab found fashion (Urban Archaeology)

I love this! What a cool concept for a column, can't wait to read more!

by Adair-Hayes Crane on A note from the Durham County jail (Urban Archaeology)

Comments

I saw the full pamphlet that included this in a laundromat; it is from the Jehovah's witnesses, and it actually …

by RichFNJames on Where we come from (Urban Archaeology)

Wow, how sweet to see this in the Indy!

When Arabella was two years old she said that she …

by Lauren C. K. Goslin on Mrs. Lauren, you are loved (Urban Archaeology)

Most Read

  1. Snow Use (Peripheral Visions)
  2. The IQ of a Dog's Butthole (Letters to the Editor)

© 2017 Indy Week • 201 W. Main St., Suite 101, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation