Pin It
Acoustica trades up genres with each song, moving from bluegrass to modern country and even pushing into psychedelic rock. But there's a defining country feel throughout.

Tennessee Jed 

Came in riding

Listen!

If you cannot see the music player below, download the free Flash Player.

click to enlarge 9.19-musspots_tenjed.gif

Tennessee Jed fancies himself a musical outlaw. Like an old-timey cowboy fronting the Western plains, the Raleigh singer-songwriter has spent much of the past year conquering his own promised land while recording his new album Acoustica. It's a passe, perhaps mawkish title, a bit incongruous with the way Jed describes himself. But the rebel is in the details: The cover bears an etching across scratched wood: "Acoustica," it says, drawn like the Metallica logo. And, inside, a tag warns, "No electric guitars were used in the making of this recording."

"The name Acoustica is sort of a take-off on Metallica," says Jed. "It's representative of what I'm trying to do. I'm using only acoustic instruments on the album. That's a theme I came up with and insisted on. I wanted to take the traditional music I love and transform it into something a little more modern, a little more rock 'n' roll."

Acoustica trades up genres with each song, moving from bluegrass to modern country and even pushing into psychedelic rock. But there's a defining country feel throughout, and old-time number "The Ballad of Sam and Molly" serves as Jed's testament to traditional string music. Jed has worn many musical hats over his career. He was a member of Jason Michael Carroll's country band, but he also played in a jam band called One Point Five. Though he loves contemporary bluegrass, he was bred on Led Zeppelin and the Dead. "I wanted all of these influences to emerge on the album, to meld into one."

But an outlaw? Actually, perhaps. Jed's album isn't full of the sweet hum of strings or traditional country formats, but it is stubbornly acoustic. "One of my new music slogans that I've come up with while making this album is this: a new breed of acoustic," he explains. "And that's what I wanted this to be—the old and the new pushed together."

Tennessee Jed plays Hideaway BBQ Saturday, Sept. 22, at 9:30 p.m. Tickets are $8-$10.

Tags: ,

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Spotlight

More by Kathy Justice

Facebook Activity

Twitter Activity

Comments

i love WXYC, except fpr the low power, hillsborough hardley gets it, metaphorically speaking. the sound quality is horrible. can …

by peterhoyt on Uncle Woody Sullender (Spotlight)

almost as good a my son, nique

by peterhoyt on Uncle Woody Sullender (Spotlight)

Most Read

No recently-read stories.

Visit the archives…

Latest videos from the INDY

© 2015 Indy Week • 201 W. Main St., Suite 101, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation