Silver Linings Playbook is more than a rom-com | Film Review | Indy Week
Pin It

Silver Linings Playbook is more than a rom-com 

Jacki Weaver and Robert De Niro in "Silver Linings Playbook"

Photo courtesy of The Weinstein Company

Jacki Weaver and Robert De Niro in "Silver Linings Playbook"

In Silver Linings Playbook, director David O. Russell's unhinged and fearless romantic comedy, Bradley Cooper plays Pat Solitano, a Philadelphia school teacher recently released from an eight-month stint in the psych ward. Pat's bipolar condition has cost him his job, his house and his wife. But he's determined to make things right as he moves back in with his parents, played by Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver.

When Pat meets recently widowed Tiffany Maxwell, a similarly damaged soul played with ferocity by Jennifer Lawrence, the two begin to orbit one another with instinctual attraction. They seem connected on some cosmic frequency: "We're not like the rest of them," Tiffany says. "We're not liars."

Silver Linings Playbook has the overall shape of a traditional romantic comedy, but inside those lines it plays by different rules entirely. Director Russell (The Fighter) builds his scenes around twisty, swerving arcs of dramatic tension and comic energy. His inquisitive camera moves willfully, lingering on odd details. Russell coaxes vigorous performances out of the cast, too. Lawrence is particularly impressive, suggesting worlds of hurt beneath her feisty Philly girl act.

Probably the most surprising thing about Silver Linings Playbook is how relentlessly funny it is. The dialogue is rooted deeply in character—you'll find no rom-com one-liners here. As such, the laughs arise with organic force, triggering that slightly out-of-control quality that can manifest in genuine fits of hysteria. You know the feeling when you literally can't stop laughing? And how that's a little scary?

Pat and Tiffany live like that all the time, in their manic phases, and they get the can't-stop-crying thing too, when the pendulum swings back. The film's great accomplishment here is conveying that feeling to the audience. Silver Linings Playbook is romantic comedy cranked to 11—reckless and satisfying.

This article appeared in print with the headline "In the same boat."

Film Details

Silver Linings Playbook
Rated R · 120 min. · 2012
Official Site: silverliningsplaybookmovie.com
Director: David O. Russell
Writer: Matthew Quick and David O. Russell
Producer: Donna Gigliotti, Bruce Cohen and Jonathan Gordon
Cast: Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Robert De Niro, Julia Stiles, Chris Tucker, Taylor Schilling, Shea Whigham, John Ortiz, Anupam Kher and Jacki Weaver

Now Playing

Sorry there are no upcoming showtimes for Silver Linings Playbook

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Film Review



Twitter Activity

Most Recent Comments

The lobster is arbitrarily asinine, disjointed, and gratuitously violent towards both humans and former humans that "didn't make it." If …

by Marco_Polo on The Lobster Surreally Skewers Society’s Fear of Single People (Film Review)

The only peeople who murdered those boys were let off by an inexperienced prosecutor and hoodwinked judge. The facts are …

by Greg 1 on The West Memphis Three are free ... what about the real killer? (Film Review)

"Miles Ahead"... "opening Friday".... where? I'm having a tough time finding film times/locations on www.indyweek.com now. The …

by Tbone on Don Cheadle’s Miles Davis Film, Miles Ahead, Isn’t a Real Biopic—It’s Something Better (Film Review)

Actually, many evangelicals and other Christians would not agree with the notion that "if you are a true believer you …

by bsquizzato on Film Review: Christian Movie Miracles From Heaven Goes Where Secular Hollywood Won't (Film Review)

Comments

The lobster is arbitrarily asinine, disjointed, and gratuitously violent towards both humans and former humans that "didn't make it." If …

by Marco_Polo on The Lobster Surreally Skewers Society’s Fear of Single People (Film Review)

Most Read

© 2016 Indy Week • 201 W. Main St., Suite 101, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation