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Sour Peppers 
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Re: “JFK, Oswald and the Raleigh connection

Grover Proctor asks, "Who is to say that, somewhere in that morass of opinion and deception, the real answer hasn't already been revealed?"

Well, Proctor is right. The real answer has been revealed. In fact, we know who killed JFK, why they did it, and how they've been able to get away with it for so long.

But because Americans (and others) have an authoritarian tendency to trust government and mainstream media over everything else, truth tellers tend to scare people away. The more answers they provide, the less persuasive they become. This is precisely the case with Against Them, the new book by Tegan Mathis.

Mathis, who is not a JFK buff by any stretch, just happened to stumble upon the true story of Watergate and the JFK assassination while doing research on Vice President Dick Cheney. He had a lot of help from Dick’s wife, Lynne Cheney.

As a young man, Dick Cheney served as a presidential aide to President Richard Nixon (from 1969 to 1973). After Nixon resigned, he became Chief of Staff to President Gerald Ford. Soon after Ford left office, Lynne Cheney wrote a “White House novel” called Executive Privilege.

A quarter of a century later, while doing his Dick Cheney research, Mathis discovered that the Lynne Cheney novel is actually a cryptic account of Watergate and the JFK assassination.

In Against Them, Mathis convincingly decrypts Lynne Cheney’s “novel” in great detail. But because so many answers are provided in so little space -- and because the very idea of finding answers in a cryptic novel is hard to swallow – people tend to get scared off. Their authoritarian tendencies forbid them from processing so much truth in so few pages. But as Proctor surmised, the truth really is there for all to see:

http://www.amazon.com/Against-Them/dp/1469…

9 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Sour Peppers on 11/15/2012 at 1:32 AM

Re: “13 documents you should read about the JFK assassination

The JFK assassination is no longer a mystery. Alexander Haig was the foreman. Howard Hunt was the architect.

Haig, like Hunt, had run ultra-covert CIA operations against Castro and Cuba in the early sixties. This is no longer a secret because both men admitted as much long before their deaths.

By 1963, Haig was working directly under from Army Secretary Cyrus Vance. Hunt was an established CIA operative with all of the right contacts in the Cuban exile community. They turned one of their anti-Castro CIA operations against President Kennedy. They used the CIA to kill the President.

A decade later, when Howard Hunt was linked to the Watergate break-in, he was quickly linked to Alexander Haig. Nobody ever talks about this (for good reason), but it’s an easy link to make once you know about their shared CIA histories.

In a nutshell, this is why Richard Nixon was removed from power -- to sustain the JFK cover-up. Once Nixon was out of the way, Gerald Ford issued an all-encompassing pardon that made all of the CIA’s troubles go away. It was always about Haig, Hunt, and the CIA. It was always about the CIA plot that killed John F. Kennedy.

It’s a simple story. All you have to do is think for yourself. But if you want to know more, read Against Them by Tegan Mathis: www.amazon.com/Against-Them/dp/1469934647/

The truth really is stranger than fiction.

10 likes, 7 dislikes
Posted by Sour Peppers on 11/14/2012 at 11:57 PM

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