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Comment Archives: Stories: Arts: Reading

Posted by Eric Ginsburg on 06/17/2015 at 9:26 AM

Re: “Assessing an active but stratified N.C. literary scene—plus, some cool 2014 titles you might have missed

Hey, thanks for the shout out for Wink of an Eye! The article was pretty cool, too :)

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Lynn Chandler Willis on 01/07/2015 at 8:06 AM

Re: “Hiroshi Watanabe's digital camera quietly probes mortality in The Day the Dam Collapses

The information on the reception is in the info box directly below Watanabe's photo.

Posted by Brian Howe, INDY arts & culture editor on 09/24/2014 at 10:06 AM

Re: “Hiroshi Watanabe's digital camera quietly probes mortality in The Day the Dam Collapses

There is a public reception for Hiroshi Watanabe's exhibition opening at Daylight on Friday, Sept. 26, 6-9pm. Daylight is located at 121 W. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough, NC 27278 (downtown, next to the public library).

https://www.facebook.com/events/813104828741032/?ref=22

Posted by daylight on 09/24/2014 at 9:47 AM

Re: “As big chains fold, Triangle indie bookstores thrive on the personal touch

Thanks Stacie and Sam. There is way too much going on in the Triangle to cover everything here (which is why living here is great), so the more events the merrier in the comments section.

Posted by Brian Howe, INDY arts & culture editor on 08/28/2014 at 11:03 AM

Re: “As big chains fold, Triangle indie bookstores thrive on the personal touch

the Bull's Head bookshop in Chapel Hill also has readings: i've posted a link to some of them here i hope that's okay.

https://www.facebook.com/bullsheadbookshop…

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Stacie Smith on 08/28/2014 at 10:52 AM

Re: “As big chains fold, Triangle indie bookstores thrive on the personal touch

... and Scott Westerfeld (Sep 24) and Jason Mott (Oct 1) ...

Posted by Sam M-B on 08/27/2014 at 4:49 PM

Re: “As big chains fold, Triangle indie bookstores thrive on the personal touch

Fantastic coverage of the great bookstores we have here. And totally awesome that Gibson is coming back to Durham for his new book!

Between now and the fall, some more excellent goings-on for bookish folks: Lev Grossman (Thursday Aug 28), John Scalzi (Aug 28 and Aug 29), Stuart Rojstaczer (Sep 11), Kim Harrison (Sep 12), John Darnielle (Sep 18 and 22), ...

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Sam M-B on 08/27/2014 at 11:42 AM

Re: “What does a state poet laureate do—and why does it matter?

No one has yet posted Valerie Macon's resume in order to enable the public to make educated comments on this situation. I presume that "elitist" was not the word intended, but rather something like the word clique (Sp?) is what happens in all poetry societies, I believe, and also Arts Councils. There always seems to be an "in" group that gets and gives all the attention and it is difficult to crack the system unless one self-publishes as she did. Macon's mind may be overflowing with ideas to share with students. I'd like to see an interview with her to see whether what she has done already is the sum of herlifelong contributions, or whether she is bursting with enthusiasm to locate a readership with whom to share her current and developing convictions. We have no idea of who she really is. No mainline media will review self-published poets or authors so we haven't read about her. The Governor must have had some kind of reliable insider information to have gone out on a limb with the appointment.

0 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by Mary Elizabeth Nordstrom on 08/09/2014 at 8:07 PM

Re: “What does a state poet laureate do—and why does it matter?

I've always been in the camp that anyone can (and should!) make art and share it however they want, or not at all. Community arts programs make that available all around NC and with technology it's becoming even easier. However, I don't think it is in any way elitist to have a practiced writer and teacher serving as poet laureate, especially if they only have 2 years to do the work. It doesn't leave much time to learn on the job. I hope that Ms. Macon continues to write and finds other ways to serve her community through art.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by jessnmoore on 08/08/2014 at 10:19 AM

Re: “What does a state poet laureate do—and why does it matter?

This attitude clearly exhibits the very elitist mentality the governor was addressing. How do you know she couldn't do the job, she wasn't even given the chance. Thank you for supporting the very walls that keep the "regular poetry" followers out. I think the four of you should be ashamed of what you put this poor lady through. For a group that should be leading the way to celebrate a skill that we celebrate from the tobacco barns and lament the way that these voices are "drowned out" in today's world, you surely turned the faucet on one that was trying to be heard. For one that has always been proud of his North Carolina writing heritage, you have given me pause.

Jonathan Bolick
Lincolnton, NC

4 likes, 17 dislikes
Posted by Jonathan K Bolick on 08/06/2014 at 11:55 PM

Re: “What does a state poet laureate do—and why does it matter?

Answers: not much and no.

1 like, 11 dislikes
Posted by ProudlyUnaffiliated on 08/06/2014 at 7:44 PM

Re: “What does a state poet laureate do—and why does it matter?

Joseph Bathanti sent the following clarification regarding the founding of the Veterans Writing Collective:

"I cannot at all take credit for founding the Veterans Writing Collective in Fayetteville. I was merely at the initial meeting, with a number of key players, in Fayetteville at Methodist University. Out of that meeting, the Collective was later formed and all the credit goes to poet and Professor Robin Greene, Paul Stroebel and a number of other hard-working folks at Methodist and in Fayetteville who have brilliantly sustained and nurtured it."

15 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Chris Vitiello on 08/06/2014 at 7:58 AM
Posted by Anne Russell on 06/11/2014 at 11:14 PM

Re: “Nero fiddles while Raleigh burns: New poetry and fiction by North Carolina authors

Lana lives! That's a relief ;)

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Brian Howe, INDY arts & culture editor on 06/04/2014 at 3:36 PM

Re: “Nero fiddles while Raleigh burns: New poetry and fiction by North Carolina authors

I'm still 'okay' But keep me on your radar :) - Lana

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Lana Pierce on 06/04/2014 at 3:02 PM

Re: “An exhaustive, exhausting investigation of the Duke lacrosse scandal

I actually didn't find this review very good at all. It suffers the same problem the reviewer cites about the book itself: a lack of insight and purpose.

Worse, a lack of honesty, which should be a prerequisite for writing reviews or articles about any subject in any paper.

First, it is very clear that it was a false rape allegation. Nowhere is that mentioned.

Second, that the victims were screwed by Duke, Durham, and the media, not to mention the race hustlers, feminists, and liberal activists who wanted to damn them because they were white men and assumed to be rich.

Crystal Magnum did not "bungle" her account or engage in "careless storytelling." She lied, repeatedly, and the physical evidence (DNA) proved it. The "accuser" who is actually a liar, is now in jail for murdering a man. Not surprisingly, she was NEVER held accountable for falsely accusing these boys, nor lying to police, nor creating all the problems she caused because she thought she could get away from it. How much did the police investigation cost the tax payers of Durham? How much did it cost Duke?

Emails and testimony later proved the Democratic DA candidate, perhaps stressed out too much by an upcoming election, engaged in illegal and unethical behavior to railroad the lacrosse players. Conduct for which caused him to lose his job and license to practice law and a fine.

Duke and Durham both settled their suits with the players to avoid having to go to court and lose. The former settled for millions of dollars.

What we've learned is that women make false rape accusations b/c they know that they will not be held accountable and b/c there is a whole support system out there to help them perpetuate the lie.

Insight in this review would be acknowledging the boys got railroaded. It would comment on media hysteria. It would take to task the poor behavior of the City of Durham and Duke University and the activists who assumed the boys were guilty because they were male, like some individuals sometimes assume a black guy is guilty of a crime he is accused of b/c he is, well, black.

3 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by TruthNotLies on 05/23/2014 at 3:43 PM

Re: “An exhaustive, exhausting investigation of the Duke lacrosse scandal

I must say I am pleasantly surprised that this review is a real review, and not a re-write of the publisher's talking points that have appeared other places. Good job on catching the essence of what isn't in the book: either new information or independent analysis. Thanks for being an objective, dispassionate reviewer.

11 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by MikeKell on 05/07/2014 at 12:31 PM

Re: “Augusten Burroughs' new book is a disappointing collection of self-help cliches

I appreciate Burroughs latest book (which came to me at a miserable time in my life). Some of his insights have been quite eye opening for me. Have I heard it before? yes, but his approach is much more my speed.

3 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Allison Cossick on 03/09/2014 at 9:03 AM

Re: “Turning leaves: a guide to this fall's reading

There's more than a few of the ones I've got on my own wishlist: David Eggers' The Circle ( McSweeney's), Stephen King's Doctor Sleep, and Nancy Farmer's The Lord of Opium. It is missing :) however, some others, among others which would be a list too long to take a minute to type up: Margaret Atwood's MaddAddam, Kim Stanley Robinson's Shaman, and Tad Williams' Happy Hour in Hell (all three out today actually); Nick Mamatas' Love is the Law; Kate Maruvama's Harrowgate; Scott Lynch's The Republic of Thieves; Jeff VanderMeer's Wonderbook; METAtropolis: Green Space; Tina Connolly's Copperhead; Cherie Priest's Fiddlehead; Lavie Tidhar's The Violent Century; Leena Krohn's Datura; Nicola Griffith's Hild; and Durham author Nathan Kotecki's follow-on to The Suburban Strange, Pull Down the Night. It's hard not to just keep running on with more books but, well, there's time and space and this comment box.

Posted by Sam M-B on 09/04/2013 at 10:12 AM

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