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Comment Archives: Stories: Arts: Fashion

Re: “Twice monthly, area designers bring wares to dtownMARKET

yayyyy!!! Belindabilly!!! xoxo Candace

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Art Acrobat on 08/03/2012 at 1:30 PM

Re: “Fashionable giving

To sponsor an orphan in the war-torn region of Southern Sudan, follow this link to www.sudanhelp.org to find out how you can bring hope and a brighter future to these needy children. http://www.sudanhelp.org

Posted by Sudan Help on 11/05/2011 at 3:12 PM

Re: “Raleigh designers repurpose old materials into intriguing new fashions

I thought the back ground of those pictures looked familiar... I am a designer at Belk Architecture, and our firm was the Architectural Design firm for Golden Belt. Owner and Principle Architect: Eddie Belk, and Project Architect for Golden Belt was Andy Shull.

Posted by kjwike on 04/03/2009 at 4:37 PM

Re: “Raleigh designers repurpose old materials into intriguing new fashions

Great article! Be sure to check out Barehanded Press at http://barehandedpress.etsy.com if you like my Starburst Buck tote!

Posted by Barehanded Press on 03/29/2009 at 7:57 PM

Re: “Fashionable giving

I know I've mentioned this elsewhere, but another great way to give to IFC this holiday season (as well as three other great area nonprofit causes) is to shop Weaver Street Market's Hope for the Holidays gift program. Each year Weaver Street Market works with local charities to raise money throughout the month of December. When you purchase any of our designated Hope For the Holidays products, we donate to several worthy causes. This year's organizations include El Futuro (http://www.elfuturo-nc.org), the Inter-Faith Council for Social Service (http://www.ifcweb.org/), PLANT @ Breeze Farm (a local incubator program for future farmers), and our own Cooperative Community Fund (an endowment to support sustainable local nonprofit initiatives). For this year's gift items list, please see the link below. There are many locally made gift products, from cards to soap to some of our own specialty breads, wines from NC vineyards, and other locally made foods; as well as fairly trade gifts from afar including African gift baskets, teas, chocolates, and fine coffees. http://www.weaverstreetmarket.coop/images/pdf/hfhlist.pdf

Posted by Jason Baker on 12/19/2008 at 11:23 AM

Re: “Educating with style

When a teacher is in an art room, it is necessary to dress for safety as well as style. It makes sense that teachers dress the part as a matter of professionalism and to help reinforce the notion of respect. Obviously the gym teacher and studio teachers have different dress needs from a math teacher. Studio art teachers have a most physical job. Their responsibilities include any day to be aable to lift heavy boxes, buckets of glazes and clay, climb ladders, stand on chairs, bend over tall kilns, crawl on floor, scrub sinks and mop floors. These teachers are expected to be able to work any day with a variety of tools. Hand tools would include hammers,pliers, screw drivers, files, snips and knives. The power tools these teachers use may include, dremels, drills, saws, and polishing wheels. Therefore art teachers should dress in a manner that would allow for the safety of the teacher to lessen the chance of injury while on the job. They must wear material that is durable, stain resistant and protective of the skin. Dressed for safety means that consideration for not only chemicals that will be encountered on a daily basis but also must evaluate the appropriateness of the personal protective equipment that could be used such as goggles, masks and aprons. OSHA standard for basic safety dress is to wear denim or heavy cotton pants because these materials are best suited for shedding sparks, flying shards of metal, chips of wood, polishing compounds, ceramic dust and glazes. Good judgment and common sense has to be used. Clothing should be compatible with a professional and safety conscious work environment. It will be modest and conservative in style. These teachers need to dress in a manner that is professional and distinguishable from attire of students. NO blue jeans. No t-shirt with logos. No high heels. Capri length pants, khakis, colored denim jeans, and sneakers are acceptable.

Posted by Brownie on 10/05/2008 at 12:16 AM

Re: “Summer sport

Here's the first preview for the Olympic uniforms designed by Ralph Lauren mentioned in the article... http://nymag.com/ daily/fashion/2008/07/ a_peak_at_ralph_laurens_prepta.html

Posted by kjust on 07/29/2008 at 10:56 AM

Re: “Back to art school with Phillip Lim and Alexander Wang

very nice presentation. but who is thet Keith?he looks realy nice.:)

Posted by FuNkY ThEo on 01/27/2008 at 6:04 AM

Re: “Stepping out, indie style

By the way, the following groups are devoted to fans of Indie Crafts: http://www.flickr.com/groups/pearthreadsfantastico http://www.flickr.com/groups/ibuyindiecrafts

Posted by puglyfeet on 11/13/2007 at 3:52 PM

Re: “Stepping out, indie style

I'm actually from San Francisco and I'm posting merely to say that I made my first indie purchase from Pearthreads.com. I bought their Scarlett Moby Messenger Bag. I'm immensely happy with my purchase and look forward to a lot of future shopping -- indie style. Following is my ode to my new indie bag: http://www.puglyfeet.com/blog/2007/11/adoring_scarlett_1.html

Posted by puglyfeet on 11/13/2007 at 3:50 PM

Re: “Raleigh's fashionSPARK shows off the Triangle's most talented designers

Rizvana Arinaz, Thank you for the fabulous write up! I think that this article was beautifully written! Warmly, Miranda Laughlin & Brittany Spangler www.BLEIGHM.com

Posted by mirandaleigh83 on 10/12/2007 at 1:09 PM

Re: “Raleigh's fashionSPARK shows off the Triangle's most talented designers

The comments regarding DRC seem to be sour grapes. The author writes about 8 out of 16 designers and offers a great feel of the quality and spirit of the show. Besides, it's an editorial - in this scale, everyone can't be individually reviewed. We saw the show, it was bigger, more exciting, and overall better than last year - from the clothes to the piercings. It's the highlight of the whole sparkcon weekend and my friends and I even bought the fashionspark T-shirts. We can all agree - well done author, designers and fashionspark people!!!

Posted by fashionsparker on 10/12/2007 at 7:01 AM

Re: “Raleigh's fashionSPARK shows off the Triangle's most talented designers

Upon reading the comments and article I am upset with this reporter's total disregard of the DRC Designers. Why leave out a designer? What else did you leave out? The article is written as if you are getting a rundown of the Fashion show not just what the reporter thinks is notable. Very misleading and reminds me of the old saying "believe half of what you read." Many people look at the Independent as an alternative to the New & Observer, me personally I love to read the Independent for local stories that I can't find in a "normal paper." It is very disheartening to find that this reporter is picking and choosing the content and set it up as fact. That is what I expect to find in the News and Observer.

Posted by bddowden on 10/11/2007 at 3:57 PM

Re: “Raleigh's fashionSPARK shows off the Triangle's most talented designers

I agree with the previous comments. I am sure the article could not address every designer but obviously the people were impressed with DRC. Just know DRC stands for D.etermination R.espect C.onquer seldom seen but often heard

Posted by seldon seen but often heard on 10/11/2007 at 1:12 PM

Re: “Raleigh's fashionSPARK shows off the Triangle's most talented designers

It's totally amazing to me that the only African American Designer in the show wasn't in this Article. I'm actually not African American but I feel like they were wronged. This article mentioned everyone except them. I felt that DRC Clothing Co, was one of the highlights for the show. Their models were so life-like and urbanly stylish. They had clothes on that people would actually wear. Kind of Angry about it really. But I am glad that all the designers got their clothing shown. But at the end of the day I only purchased something from DRC. Katia

Posted by Candide on 10/11/2007 at 7:19 AM

Re: “Out of the past: King's Motel

While I applaud the Indy for trying to include fashion features, I'm often left disappointed. The articles lack actual fashion content, and though some commentators commend this fact disparaging the superficial nature of fashion, I find this to be a sad shape of things for fashion as an art form. The fashion articles in the Indy tend to a commercial slant, with run of the mill Ben Sherman polo shirts paired against social critiques. I just don't get the praise. Stylistically its flat, and to fashion's detriment, it glosses over the artistic elements inherent in design.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by ilikecrepes on 08/28/2007 at 3:16 PM

Re: “Out of the past: King's Motel

Another provactive read and equally striking photography. Lurking in the shadows of any city's "self" are the desire, paranoia, and anxiety, that speak to the visible and invisible challenges of performing individual and cultural identities. I am amazed by how fashion and film noir captivatingly express that tension. Great work!

Posted by pea4 on 08/10/2007 at 12:00 PM

Re: “Out of the past: King's Motel

In a area known for "family life," it's nice to know that someone is highlighting the hipper side of this area. Smart article. Great photos.

Posted by CB3 on 08/10/2007 at 10:02 AM

Re: “Out of the past: King's Motel

These photographs are reminiscent of an eery film noir in the best way. Totally leave the viewer wanting more. Is Southern Durham really like that? I had no idea!

Posted by Nutella on 08/09/2007 at 6:08 PM

Re: “The collective spirit to question

Explosive! Another well written article by Rizvana Arinaz. What a way to say what you want to say by wearing it.

Posted by Asiaticstatic on 07/10/2007 at 7:17 PM

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