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Comment Archives: Events

Re: “Tescon Pol, Zula, Adult Science

https://www.facebook.com/events/3117423889…

Get tickets: http://ticketf.ly/1pvylSt

TESCON POL / ZULA / ADULT SCIENCE

Tescon Pol
The Durham/Raleigh duo crafts texturally dense soundscapes comprised of interwoven digital & analog tones, fragmented rhythms, and the sounds produced by selected objects. Spatially evocative, these futuristic cocktails are equally likely to lean in the direction of abstraction or cohesive songlike choreography (occasionally complete with vocal accompaniment). Drawing inspiration from a diverse legacy of musical influences as well as visual and literary touchstones such as Modernist & contemporary architecture, Absurdism, Cyberpunk fantasy, Art Nouveau, Existentialist fiction, and Futurist philosophy.
www.tesconpol.com
www.soundcloud.com/tesconpol

Zula
On Zula's debut album, This Hopeful, the New York-based four-piece showcase a refreshing, forward-thinking approach to psychedelic pop music. The songs weave melody through interlocking, hypnotic rhythms — suspended spaces designed to disrupt the usual flow of time. Although Zula formed in late 2010, the musical kinship of cousins Henry and Nate Terepka (both on vocals, guitar and synths) first developed through family jam sessions during the holidays. Taking inspiration from 90's UK indie-dance, krautrock and funk, the band has built a reputation for their energetic live show and for constantly pushing their heavily rhythmic sound. They have been known to deliver entire sets of never-before-played material. This restless creativity is apparent on the album, which sounds raw and spontaneous, yet meticulously detailed. It is a record with effortless flow and pulse, but enticing depth. For zoning in or out.
http://www.zulamusic.net/
https://twitter.com/zulaband

Adult Science
"Slow-burn electronic music that explores several genres of pop and dance punk without losing a sense of its own identity. In doing so, they develop a sound that's fresh and begs you to take another listen." - Igor Podolsky
http://adultscience.bandcamp.com/

Posted by Mic Finger on 08/11/2014 at 10:58 AM

Re: “DB Brownbag Lunch: 3D Printing

Thanks for sharing our event! Here's a direct link for registration: http://designbox.eventbrite.com/

Posted by Karl Sakas on 08/10/2014 at 8:45 PM

Re: “Student Action with Farmworkers Celebration

Its a good thing about farm workers, Why they not have any rights to celebrating that kind of things. Its really good for their child or their future. To learn more about farm working pls check out.
http://seasonallaboursolutions.com.au.

Posted by James Taylor on 08/05/2014 at 7:50 AM

Re: “OPEN MIC

This event has been cancelled.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by aeroeng2bee13 on 08/04/2014 at 6:50 PM

Re: “ThumperD

Thumper and Company reunite at the Berkeley Cafe. Their most famous shows there were co-headliners for 2 of the largest hurricane benefits for the Red Cross in the 90's. Thumper also ran open mics, sound and the door at the Berkeley

Links to music:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pbw9ZfoAGlU
This is "Global Village", written during the Berkeley years and recorded during an interview on television in San Antonio Tx.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq_t8gVbqTkZpJANS7Jxnlg
This is "Little Bitty", recorded live at the Nightrocker in San Antonio Tx

Posted by ThumperD on 08/02/2014 at 1:02 AM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

I'd like to explain why in the hopes that, the next time the INDY covers romance, they understand why romance novels and those who write them deserve to be treated with respect.

Why am I bothering to do so? Because I care about the INDY. I've been a reader for decades, have been interviewed by your reporters, and have good friends who are employed there. For as long as I've lived in the Triangle, the Independent Weekly has stood up for the marginalized and illuminated the lives of those the mainstream media here rarely bothers to explore. I've come to expect compassion and intelligence from you.

I think we can all agree that sexism is alive and well in 2014. With the exception of education where I believe an argument could be made that women are beginning to have parity with men, in virtually every area of society, women’s work is demeaned, dismissed, and devalued. Even when women are exceedingly successful, those accomplishments are routinely minimalized.

Which brings us to romance novels. Romance dominates today’s fiction world. Last year, the industry brought in over 1.6 billion dollars. As a genre, it out earns horror, suspense, mystery, science fiction, and inspirational. And, though there are men who read and write romance, it is by and large an industry for and by women. It’s a wildly successful, diverse, moneymaking industry that is, despite that, routinely mocked, usually by those who don’t read romance.

Sarah Wendell, the brilliant woman who runs the influential website Smart Women, Trashy Books, wrote an insightful article covering HarperCollins/NewsCorp's acquisition of Harlequin.

In it she writes,



You'd think that this was enough of a story with very wide reaching ramifications that business reporters would be able to take it seriously.

But instead of examining the differences between the two companies, how Harlequin has often led the way in digital transitions in romance, how readers perceive the different publishers as brands, how each publisher has markedly different approaches to reader cultivation, library relations, and community building, and how each has followed very different timelines for all of the above plus many other initiatives in digital and print publishing, it's much easer and a well-worn path to just make sex jokes and call it a day.

One reason why I'm particularly disappointed is that this is an area of the publishing world I know little about, except to watch what happens when Random House and Penguin merge (so far: press releases, meetings, email address confusion, then layoffs and redundancies).

It's really that difficult to see this as a business transaction that has considerable ramifications -global ramifications - for writers, employees, and readers?

Apparently. Because, as usual, when the business is about women, it's not worth the time to come up with something new or even interesting. Thanks for the reminder.



So, one reason others and I were so irked by your coverage is that it’s part of what we call everyday sexism. We experience this every damn day and it’s pissing us off.

There is a second reason the blurb was so awful. It was, unintentionally I’m sure, demeaning to the authors all of whom are astonishingly accomplished.

Jessica Scott who is pursuing a PhD at Duke and will be teaching at the US Military Academy next year is a career army officer who has served in Iraq. She’s written for the NYT At War Blog, was featured as one of Esquire Magazine’s Americans of the Year 2012, and has served twice a company commander at Fort Hood. She’s also a mother of two.

Jennifer Lohmann is a UChicago grad, a local librarian in Durham, was chosen as RWA Librarian of the year, won Harlequin’s “So You Think You Can Write” contest, has just published her fifth book, and is a tireless promoter for literacy in Durham. She recently won a Readers’ Choice Award for best first novel.

Katharine Ashe (who is in academic circles known as Katharine DuBois), has a PhD in religious history, has taught at University of Michigan, and, until she quit to write fiction full-time, was a visiting professor at Duke. She is a mom as well.

Virginia Kantra has published over twenty best-selling books, teaches professional writers workshops for authors, and is a mother of three. Her recent series is set in Dare County, NC.

I hope this helps explain why I found your blurb so offensive.

Sincerely,

Dabney Grinnan
Partner at All About Romance

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dabney Grinnan on 08/01/2014 at 3:05 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

Race and genre are not remotely similar, yes. Race and gender, however, usually are considered to be so.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dabney Grinnan on 07/31/2014 at 4:28 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

I also feel that I should address the comments here asking if we would do something like this based on racial stereotypes. I find this comparison extremely odd. Race and genre are not even remotely equivalent.

Posted by Brian Howe, INDY arts & culture editor on 07/31/2014 at 4:13 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

I find it ironic that most of the angry and upset people that posted in this article are sexist themselves when they think that only women read romance novels (that makes you a hypocrite). There are plenty of men that read them also. Even as a kid when all that I had to read were my mom's True Romance and True Story romance magazines, they were pretty much written in the same manner. Not to take away anything that these women have written in their particular style of romance novels but when one conjures "romance novels" one thinks of the Fabio covered books that would use this "style" of writing. To accuse Zach of never reading a romance novel (have you asked him personally?) and to call him sexist is just plain arrogant and ridiculous. It was written in a style of satirical humor and nothing more. If you want to put words in his mouth because you are having a bad day and are taking it out on someone who meant no harm, then please take a deep breath put your anger to some better use.

2 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Larry Matthew Crowe on 07/31/2014 at 3:13 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

This blurb was intended to direct our readers toward a unique event in a humorous, light-hearted way. I'm sorry that it didn't strike some of you that way.

But I do not agree that the blurb is sexist. It’s a broad, silly parody of the style of romance novels. There is nothing in it about the people who read them or about women in general. The language is not gendered.

The idea that the blurb disrespects female readers and writers is problematic because women, of course, read and write a wide variety of things--all the things that men do--and many don’t read romance novels at all. Meanwhile, Romance Writers of America reports that 9% of romance novel readers are men.

I do understand the perception that the blurb is not respectful of the romance genre. But it is not uncommon for us to take an irreverent tone in our preview blurbs, and Zack has written many of them--on all manner of genres--in a satirical voice.

2 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Brian Howe, INDY arts & culture editor on 07/31/2014 at 2:27 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

Per http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sexism?show=0&t=1406825779: sexism is defined as "behavior, conditions, or attitudes that foster stereotypes of social roles based on sex"
Now, imagine that piece being read aloud.
Do you hear in it a male or female voice?
Now visualize the monologue as performed by each sex. Is it a male or female performer?
Is the core message informational or is it overriden by the tone? How would you define the tone? Sarcastic? If so, the author is ridiculing a group that are primarily women writers and women readers. Insulting? To the authors and genre and attendees, definitely. Informative? I think not. Uplifting or respectful? Ha!
Again, what if this were race-based? Would it be comedic or racist?

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Kristi Scarbrough Weldon on 07/31/2014 at 1:13 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

What a sexist piece of crap.

4 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Carrie Gwaltney on 07/31/2014 at 12:57 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

It's not just me who is offended by this. If you are on Twitter, the @indyweek tag is being criticized by women writers for being offensive and sexist. Here's hoping the INDY listens and rethinks their attitude toward romance.

9 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dabney Grinnan on 07/31/2014 at 12:39 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

It is sexism when you take an event that is paneled by women and attended by mostly women, and make fun of it using language that he, a man who has clearly read no romance novels, has decided represents the obviously overwrought emotions of the women involved. If this had been a panel of Asian-American authors and he had written up the event in fake pidgin Chinese, I'd be offended then too. Don't do that.

15 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Amy Jo Cousins on 07/31/2014 at 12:19 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

It's sexist in that this was a professional event featuring four women speaking about their work. He belittles the work--the books mentioned--and their writers. When women speak about everyday sexism this is the sort of thing they're talking about. Work done by women that is, in general, utilized by women, is mocked as a way to diminish its power. That's why I'm playing the sexist card.

12 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dabney Grinnan on 07/31/2014 at 12:18 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

I see that Mr. Smith is lampooning the romance novel genre by writing in a stereotypical feverish style, but how is he engaging in sexism?

4 likes, 8 dislikes
Posted by David Klein on 07/31/2014 at 12:09 PM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

How ironic that I just wrote two blog posts this week on sexual harassment and wrote in conclusion that I did think we were getting better, although we have far to go. This? This is not getting better. This is a steaming pile of sexism and I'm embarrassed for both the writer and whatever editor approved this. You think you're being funny, but the rule in comedy is that you should always "punch up" and not down. You can crack jokes about people for being hypocritical or careless with their power. You don't take a subject that is popular particularly with women and then make fun of them for it. That's cheap and crass. You should know better. You should do better.

22 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Amy Jo Cousins on 07/31/2014 at 11:58 AM

Re: “Rosé and Romance

Wow, you guys are really on the "we think we're edgy" but we're really sexist train here. I won't bore you or Mr. Smith with the extraordinary accomplishments of these four women or the phenomenal success of romance in the publishing world. I will ask: If this night had featured authors who wrote books about murder, incest, dismemberment, or random violence against women, would you have written such a condescending blurb?

23 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Dabney Grinnan on 07/31/2014 at 11:25 AM

Re: “Fiddler on the Roof

Wonderfully talented teens in this show!! They do Fiddler more than justice!

Posted by pvp on 07/26/2014 at 7:17 AM

Re: “Alek Walker

the kid had a great blues raspy voice !! Good Times

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by coach3 on 07/19/2014 at 1:10 PM

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