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Monday, January 16, 2017

Matthew Griffin Snags 2017 Crook's Corner Book Prize for His Graceful Novel, Hide

Posted By on Mon, Jan 16, 2017 at 6:08 PM

Greensboro native Matthew Griffin has won the fourth-annual Crook's Corner Book Prize for a debut novel set in the South. Griffin, now based in New Orleans, attended the ceremony to accept the honor, which was selected by Tom Franklin, a novelist and writing professor at the University of Mississippi at Oxford. Announced Monday night during a reception at the award's namesake Chapel Hill restaurant, the prize includes $5,000 and confers the privilege of a glass of wine at Crook's every day for a year. Griffin's Hide, described in a Booklist starred review as "something like a miracle," is set in...

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Friday, January 13, 2017

Theater Review: An In-Process Adaptation of De Profundis Is Still Floundering in Oscar Wilde's Seas

Posted By on Fri, Jan 13, 2017 at 4:49 PM

De Profundis ★ ½ PlayMakers Repertory Company, Chapel Hill Through Sunday, Jan. 15 Last year, PlayMakers Repertory Company's second-stage series devoted an entire season to two-to-five-year-old repertory solo works by out-of-town playwrights, in a drastically smaller-scale, alt-theater version of the itinerant shows that visit DPAC and DECPA. So it was entirely appropriate to raise the stakes this season. In August, PRC² presented the world premiere of Mashuq Mushtaq Deen’s autobiographical solo, Draw the Circle. In late December, director Brian Mertes, designer Jim Findlay, and actor Nicole Villamil began a three-week residency to create a new stage adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s De Profundis,...

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Movie Review: In Silence, Scorsese Taps a Deeply Spiritual Vein in a Visceral Story of Faith

Posted By on Thu, Jan 12, 2017 at 1:19 PM

Silence ★★★★ ½ Opening Friday, Jan. 13 We may never see the likes of Martin Scorsese again in American cinema. He’s the embodiment of what Orson Welles should have become: the master auteur and leader of a New Hollywood movement who nimbly balances fan-friendly and money-making gangster flicks, psychological thrillers, and edgy character dissections with highly personal and profound films. While his American New Wave contemporaries like Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Francis Ford Coppola have migrated to effects-driven sequels and semi-retirement, Scorsese continues to produces masterworks like Silence, one of the most deeply spiritual and religiously layered films...

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

NC Comicon and Oak City Comicon Consolidate Brands as New Competition From Florida Looms

Posted By on Wed, Jan 11, 2017 at 3:38 PM

Basking in the success of November’s annual NC Comicon in Durham and its Raleigh-based spinoff, Oak City Comicon, the conventions' owners recently announced plans to consolidate their brands. The Oak City show on March 18 and 19 is now called “NC Comicon: Oak City” and the traditional Durham Convention Center show planned for November is “NC Comicon: Bull City.” Underlying NC Comicon’s expansion, as the owners are calling it, might be a concerted effort to fend off new competition. It's not the first time NC Comicon has faced down a bigger challenger. A few years ago, another convention, Wizard World—part of...

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Friday, January 6, 2017

The Nasher Museum of Art Receives a Significant Gift, a Major Painting by Archibald Motley

Posted By on Fri, Jan 6, 2017 at 3:13 PM

“Hot Rhythm,” a major painting by Archibald Motley, has been donated to the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Two of the artist’s heirs, Mara Motley and Valerie Gerrard Browne, have given the dynamic work to the Nasher in honor of Richard J. Powell, Duke’s John Spencer Bassett Professor of Art and Art History, and C.T. Woods-Powell. Powell curated the standout 2014 exhibition Archibald Motley: Jazz Age Modernist, which originated at the Nasher before traveling to the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, the Chicago Cultural Center,...

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Wednesday, December 21, 2016

Movie Review: Passengers Proves a Bad Ending Can Ruin an Otherwise Good Movie

Posted By on Wed, Dec 21, 2016 at 4:08 PM

Passengers ★★ ½ Now playing Exhibit 2001 for the proposition that a bad ending can ruin an otherwise good movie: Passengers, a glossy interstellar vehicle for some provocative moral entanglements that ultimately implodes from the pressure of its star-driven, crowd-pleasing mission. The film’s December release date suggests it once harbored awards-season aspirations. Instead, it just ends up lost in space. Jim Preston (Chris Pratt) is one of more than five thousand people in cryogenic sleep aboard the Starship Avalon, on a 120-year voyage to colonize the distant outpost Homestead II. The ship’s sylvan destination stands in contrast to Earth,...

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Thursday, December 15, 2016

Theater Review: Take High Tea with Little Women in the Women's Theatre Festival's Holiday Production

Posted By on Thu, Dec 15, 2016 at 2:40 PM

Little Women★★★ Through Dec. 18 Women’s Theatre Festival @ Sonorous Road Theatre, Raleigh At its heart, the Women’s Theatre Festival is actually a conveyance: a theatrical vehicle intent on moving the region (and, by extension, our culture) forward by bringing a broader array of women’s voices and stories to the fore, and by leading women to more equitable states of theatrical access, training, and competency than they’ve had in the past. In this new production of Little Women, the group passes another milestone toward those laudable goals: a holiday show, in the vein of seasonal productions by more established...

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Tuesday, December 13, 2016

Movie Review: Rogue One, the New Star Wars, Is a Dazzling Space Drama

Posted By on Tue, Dec 13, 2016 at 2:13 PM

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story ★★★★ Opening Thursday, Dec. 15 As the first in a series of spinoff movies set in the Star Wars universe, Rogue One is an experiment of sorts. If it succeeds, you can expect to see a new Star Wars movie in theaters pretty much every year until the end of time. Fine by me. If Disney and Lucasfilm can deliver a movie as good as Rogue One on a yearly basis, we could declare it a kind of global movie holiday. May 4 would seem to be the proper date. Rogue One is essentially...

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Friday, December 9, 2016

Theater Review: A Leading Local Theater Artist Mines Her Life's Schisms, Contradictions, and Eerie Beauty in Ethelred the Unready

Posted By on Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 2:56 PM

Ethelred the Unready★★★ ½ Through Dec. 10 Little Green Pig Theatrical Concern, various venues There are hundreds of professional actors in the area, but prior to Dana Marks’s Ethelred the Unready, only three have produced an autobiographical one-person show in the last decade. Why? Solo performance is daunting; autobiographical solo work is even harder. In the former, you merely spend an hour onstage, alone, before a live audience. In the latter, you also open some of the most private parts of your life—irrevocably—to public scrutiny. It’s more than enough reason, all told, for anyone to think twice. But monologists...

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Movie Review: Office Christmas Party Is Raucous, Rude, Lampoon-Worthy Fun

Posted By on Fri, Dec 9, 2016 at 1:54 PM

Office Christmas Party ★★★ Now playing I've been to exactly one office Christmas party in my life. It was in San Francisco during the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s, when the Internet held infinite promise and banks were hosing down new media companies with cash. Everyone was young and restless, designer drugs were cheap and plentiful, and money wasn't really money at all. We partied like it was 1999, because it was 1999. I remember thinking, "This party would be an excellent premise for a movie." (That's about all I remember.) Twenty years later, that movie has finally rolled...

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Thursday, December 8, 2016

Theater Review: Is The May Queen an Indictment of the Male Gaze or an Apologia for a Stalker?

Posted By on Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 9:19 AM

The May Queen★★★ Through Dec. 11 PlayMakers Repertory Company, Chapel Hill Molly Smith Metzler surely intended her play The May Queen as more than an apologia for a stalker, but it’s hard to leave the current production at PlayMakers Repertory Company without the nagging sense that her critique of an annual, real-world rite of spring in a small New York State town, and of the social pecking order found in high schools everywhere, has somehow lost its way. Metzler’s hometown of Kingston has named a May Queen every spring since 1916. The tradition continues despite the ritual’s possibly sinister origins...

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Photo Journal: The Day the KKK Marched Down East Franklin Street

Posted By on Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 11:22 AM

In June 1987, a day after he graduated high school, Michael Galinsky took a camera with a telephoto lens and a bunch of film to document a Ku Klux Klan rally in Chapel Hill. Until recently, these photographs could be relegated to a regrettable past. A video installation combining Galinsky's photos with interviews from the event is part of the Southern Accent exhibit at the Nasher Museum of Art. It reveals the extent to which Chapel Hillians considered the KKK an anachronism, but, in the wake of Donald Trump's election and the surge in strident voices of intolerance nationwide, these images...

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Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Dance Review: Stephanie Leathers and Company Deconstruct Durham Development in Home: the metamorphosis

Posted By on Wed, Nov 23, 2016 at 4:53 PM

Stephanie Leathers: Home: the metamorphosis★★★ Saturday, Nov. 12, 6:30 p.m. Downtown Durham On the map on the wall, the usual “You are here” marker is absent. In its place are multicolored circular stickers, plotting scalloped pathways through downtown Durham. Some of these stickers presumably answer the question, “Where do you fall?” The ticket-taker encourages us to interpret the question broadly. Stephanie Leathers’s Home: the metamorphosis is friendly to queries of spatial orientation. The second offering from Durham Independent Dance Artists in its current season, Home is a traveling performance in the truest sense. Nearly every moment is locomotive. Leathers...

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Students at Apex Friendship High School Celebrate Their Unsung Heroes

Posted By on Wed, Nov 23, 2016 at 10:47 AM

Tracey Wooten, a teacher at Apex Friendship High School, gave her students an assignment to annotate a series of articles about the nature of heroism. She also had them read excerpts of The Epic of Gilgamesh and Oedipus the King. Armed with insight on the heroic, the students were then asked to interview someone they admired and write a persuasive letter nominating them for an “Unsung Hero Award.” When Wooten asked me if I would judge the letters and select the top three, I thought that Thanksgiving week—especially this one, in a fraught post-election moment—was a perfect time to salute...

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Friday, November 18, 2016

Movie Review: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Is a Promising Start for a New Rowling Franchise

Posted By on Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 2:49 PM

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them ★★★ ½ Now playing I suspect that, for a while at least, it's going to be difficult to avoid processing every halfway applicable film through the nightmare lens of the recent elections. Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, the latest installment in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter universe, opens with a montage of headlines. “Anti-Wizard Sentiment Sweeps America,” reads one swirling paper as we're introduced to the setup. In the movie's alternate history, it's 1926 in New York City, and hateful fringe groups are agitating for the deportation of all witches and wizards, the...

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Movie Review: Barry Jenkins's Exquisite Moonlight Is a Meditative Character Study at the Nexus of Black Masculinity and Homosexuality

Posted By on Fri, Nov 18, 2016 at 8:46 AM

Moonlight ★★★★ Now playing Color looms large in Moonlight. The film is adapted from Tarell Alvin McCraney’s play In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue, and two characters are called Black and Blue. According to IndieWire, director Barry Jenkins and cinematographer James Laxton adjusted the lighting contrast to emphasize the skin tones of the African-American cast. Each of the film’s three chapters, covering different stages in the life of its protagonist, emulates different film stock to convey distinct hues and textures. Like Richard Linklater’s Boyhood, Moonlight tracks the life of its male lead across varying ages, though in this case the...

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Thursday, November 17, 2016

Gilbert Gottfried's Comedy Cuisine: A Slice of Pizza and a Grape Drink

Posted By on Thu, Nov 17, 2016 at 9:21 AM

Gilbert Gottfried Thursday, Nov. 17–Saturday, Nov. 19 Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh Comedian Gilbert Gottfried’s voice is one of the most recognizable in America, though his X-rated jokes stand in stark contrast with the hoarse shout that has given life to so many advertising and cartoon characters, including the parrot in Disney’s Aladdin. A veteran of stand-up since his teenage years, Gottfried joined the cast of Saturday Night Live in 1980 and then broke through into film, his outlandish humor earning him prominent roles in the Problem Child franchise and other slapstick comedies. Recently, in addition to voiceover and acting work,...

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Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Will to Live Cautiously Returning? Here's a Few Things to Do This Week.

Posted By and on Wed, Nov 16, 2016 at 3:26 PM

STAGE TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15–SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20 SPAMALOT “Strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony!” We’ve become so much more politically sophisticated since the time of King Arthur. Still, anyone feeling nostalgic for the days of the Round Table—or the Tony award-winning 2005 musical based on Monty Python and the Holy Grail—should catch NC Theatre’s revival of Spamalot, starring Broadway’s Jeff McCarthy and Ta’Rea Campbell. Jennifer Werner directs. —Byron Woods RALEIGH MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM, RALEIGH STAGE WEDNESDAY,...

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Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Theater Review: Dividing and Conquering by Lying and Stirring Base Emotions in Richard III

Posted By on Tue, Nov 15, 2016 at 2:28 PM

Richard III ★★★★ Through Nov. 20 Bare Theatre @ Sonorous Road Theatre, Raleigh Seth Blum’s disarmingly matter-of-fact—and absolutely lethal—take on Richard, the implacable Duke of Gloucester, was one of the most vivid performances in a late-summer production of Henry VI: The War of the Roses. His patient explanations of Richard’s psychopathic plans to achieve the crown by pruning the royal family trees suggested a character from House of Cards, a “fifteenth-century Frank Underwood, minus the charming Southern accent,” as we noted at the time. So we were enthused to learn Bare Theatre let director Lucinda Danner Gainey continue pursuing that...

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Monday, November 14, 2016

Movie Review: The Communication Gap in Arrival Feels Painfully Relevant in America Right Now

Posted By on Mon, Nov 14, 2016 at 12:26 PM

Arrival ★★★★ Now playing This week, Americans sought to speak using the common language of the ballot. Now half the country is celebrating the arrival of an iconoclastic new leader, while the other half is gripped with despondency and even fear. It's hard not to think about this when watching Arrival, an aliens-to-Earth film that’s less about first contact than first communication. Twelve black, split-shaped ovoids simultaneously appear around the planet, each measuring 1,500 feet high and hovering mere meters above the surface. The arrival of these ships triggers immediate hysteria—air travel is grounded, gun sales are barred, food rationing...

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Friday, November 11, 2016

Theater Review: Two Turtle Doves Skims the Underside of Sports and Small-Town Sleaze

Posted By on Fri, Nov 11, 2016 at 1:49 PM

Two Turtle Doves ★★★ ½ Through Nov. 12 Common Ground Theatre, Durham There’s a hint of the unsavory from the outset of local playwright Mark Cornell’s Two Turtle Doves, now in its premiere production at Common Ground Theatre. The off-avocado wallpaper and aged amenities on designer Jeff Alguire’s set suggest a time-share resort half gone to seed. And after Meredith, a sullen girl with a flat east Carolina accent, cusses out a hotel clerk on the phone, our unease is unabated when a visibly uncomfortable—and much older—man named James emerges from the bathroom in a snorkel and swimsuit and tries...

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Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Theater News: Common Ground Theatre to Go Dark in December

Posted By on Tue, Nov 8, 2016 at 9:00 AM

Common Ground Theatre, the influential, intimate Durham venue that has nurtured regional independent theater and improv comedy throughout its twelve-year run, is set to cease operations next month. Last night, executive director Shelby Hahn told the INDY that he will step down at the end of December. Hahn took the post in July 2015 after the departure of former director Devra Thomas. Following an unsuccessful search across the theatrical community for his replacement, the company’s board decided to cease operations when Hahn leaves. Rachel Klem and Michelle Byars created the theater in 2005 to provide an affordable rehearsal and...

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Friday, November 4, 2016

Movie Review: Doctor Strange's Feisty Magic Cape Is the Most Developed Character in His Movie

Posted By on Fri, Nov 4, 2016 at 12:26 PM

Doctor Strange ★★★ Now playing Held together by countless terabytes of computer effects, fortune cookie wisdom, and the backing of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Doctor Strange is an origin story that’s high on origin yet low on story. It features a hero you don’t particularly like, a villain who’s not well defined, and ephemeral stakes that are hard to embrace. Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) is an arrogant, skilled neurosurgeon who performs medical miracles by day, then dons designer suits and Jaeger-LeCoultre wristwatches after hours. His life of ease changes dramatically after he drives his Lamborghini off a cliff, incurring...

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Thursday, November 3, 2016

Movie Review: In Hacksaw Ridge, Mel Gibson Clearly Identifies with the Religious Persecution of Conscientious Objector Desmond Doss

Posted By on Thu, Nov 3, 2016 at 2:09 PM

Hacksaw Ridge★★★ ½ Opening Friday, Nov. 4 The history of cinema is littered with films that serve as allegories for the real-life persecution of their writers/directors. On the Waterfront is widely viewed as Budd Schulberg and Elia Kazan’s retort to those who objected to them naming names before the House Un-American Activities Commission. By contrast, writer Carl Foreman’s screenplay for High Noon is regarded as his response to the mistreatment he suffered after not cooperating with HUAC. Roman Polanski’s 1978 conviction for child rape and subsequent flight informs a large portion of his subsequent filmography. It’s unnecessary to refute Mel Gibson’s self-subscribed...

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Wednesday, November 2, 2016

UNC Visiting Writer April Ayers Lawson Discusses Her Paris Review Prize-Winning Story "Virgin"

Posted By on Wed, Nov 2, 2016 at 4:02 PM

April Ayers Lawson and Clare Beams Friday, Nov. 4, 7 p.m., free Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill April Ayers Lawson made her surprise literary debut—her third publication ever—in The Paris Review’s Fall 2010 issue, with the smart, sensual, and devastating “Virgin,” a finely observed story of lust and infidelity that begins with the sentence, "Jake hadn't meant to stare at her breasts, but there they were, absurdly beautiful, almost glowing above the plunging neckline of the faded blue dress." In 2011, the publication’s board unanimously chose the story to receive its Plimpton Prize for Fiction. Now “Virgin” and four more emotionally and sexually tense...

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I've been to the last 2 NC ComiCons in Durham. It's a great event, but the panels are kind of …

by Ruby Sinreich on NC Comicon and Oak City Comicon Consolidate Brands as New Competition From Florida Looms (Arts)

Also, don't miss Illogicon this weekend http://illogicon.org/ - it's another great fan event!

by Mike S Broder on NC Comicon and Oak City Comicon Consolidate Brands as New Competition From Florida Looms (Arts)

I'm excited for http://raleighsupercon.com, but i mean I'm always excited for NC Comicon too lol! no reason to pick one, …

by Way P Stark on NC Comicon and Oak City Comicon Consolidate Brands as New Competition From Florida Looms (Arts)

I dont know what why all the complaints about the ending. Its not horrible and its the most obvious ending …

by Helena Hayes on Movie Review: Passengers Proves a Bad Ending Can Ruin an Otherwise Good Movie (Arts)

Great post,thanks for sharing this.
http://www.freemahj.com/free-mahjong/ …

by AnamZara on The "legacy" of TRON is real: Looking back at a ground-breaking movie (Arts)

Comments

I've been to the last 2 NC ComiCons in Durham. It's a great event, but the panels are kind of …

by Ruby Sinreich on NC Comicon and Oak City Comicon Consolidate Brands as New Competition From Florida Looms (Arts)

Also, don't miss Illogicon this weekend http://illogicon.org/ - it's another great fan event!

by Mike S Broder on NC Comicon and Oak City Comicon Consolidate Brands as New Competition From Florida Looms (Arts)

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