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Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Peak Potter-Mania Has Passed, but the Old Magic Lingers at the Regulator's Cursed Child Release Party

Posted By on Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 4:05 PM

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Release Party Saturday, Aug. 30 The Regulator Bookshop, Durham There was magic in the air on Saturday night at the Regulator Bookshop. An hour before midnight, the store was filled with an assortment of witches, house elves, Hogwarts professors, stuffed owls, and no shortage of nostalgia. The Regulator—along with bookstores across the country—was hosting a midnight release party for the eighth Harry Potter installment, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. It’s been nine years since the last book came out. Katherine McNulty has read all seven books twice—and out loud. She attended the Regulator’s...

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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Roman Vampire Lords, Telepathic Trees, and Smartphone Witch-Hunting Apps at Quail Ridge Books

Posted By on Wed, Jul 27, 2016 at 3:00 PM

Tony Daniel: The Dragon Hammer Thursday, July 28, 7 p.m. Thomas Olde Heuvelt: Hex Monday, August 1, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Raleigh Raleigh’s Quail Ridge Books just celebrated its grand reopening in North Hills. Two events there this week also basically reopen the Triangle's speculative-fiction events calendar after a quiet start to the summer. Tomorrow is the book launch for Wake Forest author Tony Daniel's first young-adult novel, The Dragon Hammer (Baen Books, July 5). Daniel is best known for science fiction, from the short stories he’s been publishing for almost twenty years to his Metaplanetary series and his...

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Thursday, June 30, 2016

Quail Ridge Books Sets Opening Date for Its New Raleigh Location

Posted By on Thu, Jun 30, 2016 at 5:19 PM

Last December, beloved Raleigh indie bookstore Quail Ridge Books announced it would be leaving its location in the Ridgewood Shopping Center. Since then, the shop has been in a temporary space, endearingly known as Quail Ridge Books on the Fly, at 4381-105 Lassiter at North Hills Ave. In a few weeks, though, Quail Ridge Books will hold its grand opening at its new, nine-thousand-square-foot location just down the way, at 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Road. Yes, there will be a party. It will be held July 23 and 24, and, according to a release from the bookstore, will be "complete with games, prizes...

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Thursday, May 5, 2016

Video: Watch Durham's Monica Byrne Turn Into a Hologram in Vancouver TED Talk

Posted By on Thu, May 5, 2016 at 2:23 PM

Durham author and playwright Monica Byrne is known for raveling disparate strands of gender, race, and love in speculative social orders, from the acclaimed novel The Girl in the Road to the ambitious play Tarantino's Yellow Speedo. Last February, she added to that list with For My Wife, Navid, a story commissioned by Chris Anderson and then performed live at TED 2016 in Vancouver. The performance, in which Byrne portrays a hologram (aided by clever lighting and digital glitch effects), went up on TED's website today. "From what I heard afterwards, a full third of the audience thought I was actually a...

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Thursday, April 28, 2016

Sharpen Your Script With UNC Teacher and Veteran Screenwriter Scott Myers

Posted By on Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 2:43 PM

Write Now! Saturday, April 30 The McKimmon Conference & Training Center, Raleigh For aspiring and established screenwriters alike, Scott Myers is an invaluable resource for storytelling tips and film-industry insight. On Saturday, April 30, the UNC instructor joins other Triangle storytellers to dispense advice live. Myers is a presenter at Write Now!, the annual writing conference held by the Triangle Association of Freelancers, which includes sessions on self-editing, running a freelance “business,” and how to get published. Myers’s session is on “Character Development for Screenwriters,” though, as he’s quick to point out, “It’s actually for all writers.” “We’ll be talking about...

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

North Carolina's Independent Bookstores Band Together Against HB 2

Posted By on Wed, Apr 20, 2016 at 11:25 AM

Naturally, the open letter that independent bookstores across the state sent to the governor’s office and circulated online late last week begins by quoting a book. The petitioners use Ray Oldenburg’s assertion that “third places … are the heart of a community's social vitality and the grassroots of democracy” to frame their argument for the repeal of House Bill 2. “As independent bookstores providing that third place in communities across our state,” the letter continues, “we believe it is essential to be non-discriminatory, inclusive and tolerant, to promote freedom of speech and equality, and to guard against censorship and...

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Friday, April 1, 2016

Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend

Posted By on Fri, Apr 1, 2016 at 9:59 AM

Like many book-lovers in the Triangle, I felt as though I lost a family member last Sunday. Nancy Olson’s passing at age seventy-five was not a complete surprise to those who knew her. For several years, she’d been battling kidney disease, which played a part in her decision to sell Quail Ridge Books, the independent bookstore she opened in Raleigh in 1984.  But she remained a vital presence at Quail Ridge, often appearing at store signings, beaming as authors were introduced and chatting with them like old friends afterward. Occasionally, I’d say hi, and she’d introduce me to the...

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Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Interview: Durham Author Travis Mulhauser on His Harshly Beautiful Debut Novel, Sweetgirl

Posted By on Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 1:30 PM

Sweetgirl By Travis Mulhauser Ecco/HarperCollins, Feb. 2016, 256 pp. Sweetgirl, the debut novel by Durham resident Travis Mulhauser, is a slow-burning yet electrifying tale set in the dead of winter in northern Michigan. On the cusp of a snowstorm, Percy, an intelligent and eloquent sixteen-year-old high school dropout, embarks to find her meth-addicted mother, who might be with Cutler County’s biggest scumbag, Shelton Potter. The long, winding course of Percy’s evening changes drastically when she finds a not-quite-abandoned baby in a house with two passed out addicts. What follows, in alternating chapters, is Percy’s attempt to rescue the baby...

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Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Interview: Actress and Poet Amber Tamblyn Surveys Hollywood's Toll on Women in Dark Sparkler

Posted By on Tue, Feb 23, 2016 at 12:02 PM

Amber Tamblyn Wednesday, Feb. 24, 7 p.m. The Regulator Bookshop You’ve probably seen Amber Tamblyn on TV—as a child actor on General Hospital, on her own show Joan of Arcadia, on the cult cop dramady The Unusuals (with Jeremy Renner), or in supporting roles in House and Two and a Half Men. Or maybe you’ve seen some of the many movies she’s been in, including the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants films. Tamblyn is also an accomplished poet with several published collections. Her latest, Dark Sparkler (Harper Perennial), was initially inspired by the abrupt death of Brittany Murphy. It’s a series...

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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

In Barsk: The Elephants' Graveyard, Science-Fiction Writer Lawrence M. Schoen Poignantly Probes Our Relationship With Death

Posted By on Wed, Feb 3, 2016 at 2:34 PM

Lawrence M. Schoen Flyleaf Books, Thursday, Feb. 4, 7 p.m. Quail Ridge Books, Friday, Feb. 5, 7 p.m. When was the last time a science-fiction novel made you cry? Until recently, I would have said it was Cormac McCarthy’s emotionally devastating The Road, which I read as a new father. But then I read Barsk: The Elephants’ Graveyard (Tor Books, December 2015), Lawrence M. Schoen’s moving novel about—stay with me—space elephants. Almost ten years after McCarthy took us into a post-apocalyptic wasteland of hopelessness and gray dust, I’m approaching the age when I read more obituaries than birth notices. While...

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Thursday, January 21, 2016

Interview: Award-winning Raleigh poet Dorianne Laux on the unique writing community in North Carolina

Posted By on Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 2:29 PM

Raleigh’s Dorianne Laux is the author of five books of poetry. Her most recent collection, The Book of Men, won the Paterson Prize. She has also won or been a finalist for the Best American Poetry Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Oregon Book Award and the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize, among many other recognitions and fellowships. Born in Augusta, Maine, in 1952, Laux worked as a sanatorium cook, a gas-station manager, a maid and a donut-holer before receiving a BA in English from Mills College. After living and teaching in Oregon, Laux now lives with her husband,...

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Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Year in Review: Notable North Carolina literary fiction and nonfiction

Posted By on Tue, Dec 29, 2015 at 9:49 AM

What does it even mean to read local? That was the question I confronted while thinking about how to cover the year in books from North Carolina. It’s easy to answer in areas like visual art, theater and dance: The artists live here, put up work here and share creative and social networks. But the solitary world of writers is different—more dispersed and amorphous, with less emphasis on site-specific performance and more emphasis on the artifact that, if it succeeds, untangles from its origins to become timeless and placeless, absorbed into the phantom state of literature. Without a dedicated gathering...

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Friday, November 20, 2015

Rebranded as Little Corner, Duke’s excellent poetry series escapes the confines of campus

Posted By on Fri, Nov 20, 2015 at 10:20 AM

Little Corner Reading Series: Bhanu Kapil and Paul Singleton III Saturday, Nov. 21, 8 p.m. The Shed 807 E. Main St., Durham www.shedjazz.com Duke University has long been a hub for weird, interesting poetry—if you knew how to find it. Its poetry reading series, formerly known as Minor American and later as Manic Caravan, has hosted both world-renowned writers like Eileen Myles and up-and-coming talents like Philadelphia’s Ryan Eckes. But if you weren’t already plugged into academic life, these events could seem inaccessible, tucked away in the stately parlors of Duke’s East Campus. That has changed this season under the...

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Wednesday, November 11, 2015

The INDY Audiobooks Poll: Triangle fiction writers talk reading technology

Posted By on Wed, Nov 11, 2015 at 11:14 AM

For an essay on audiobooks this week, the INDY sent a questionnaire to authors around the Triangle. We were delighted by the variety and volume of their responses, which are reproduced in full here.  CHARLIE LOVETT: 1. Have you ever made an audiobook? If so, what was the experience and the result like? If not, would you ever want to? Why or why not? I've never recorded one myself, and I don't think I'd want to. Although I have a theater background and people say I have a voice for radio, I am in awe of what professional audio book...

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Friday, October 16, 2015

Unclassifiable author Brian Selznick gives young readers a gentle introduction to tragedy

Posted By on Fri, Oct 16, 2015 at 12:52 PM

Brian Selznick Friday, Oct. 16, 7 p.m., $5 Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Raleigh 3313 Wade Ave., Raleigh 919-828-1588 www.quailridgebooks.com Brian Selznick’s books for children are hard to define. They combine long, wordless illustrated sequences with equally long chunks of prose. They jump between the past and present, crafting mysteries that wind up involving real history and historical figures, but with a modern attitude. There’s a darkness and maturity to them that should go over most kids’ heads, but they’re beloved by elementary and middle-school children. Selznick’s latest book, The Marvels, which he’s promoting tonight at a Quail Ridge Books-sponsored talk...

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Thursday, April 9, 2015

Interview: Barney Frank discusses his new memoir of a life in progressive politics

Posted By on Thu, Apr 9, 2015 at 3:26 PM

Barney Frank NCSU Hunt Library Auditorium Monday, April 13, 7 p.m. Former Massachusetts Congressman Barney Frank is known primarily for three things: Being the first openly gay member of the House of Representatives, co-sponsoring the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act after the 2008 financial crisis, and wielding a candid, sometimes lacerating sense of humor to win debates. All three entwine in his new memoir of "a life in politics from the Great Society to same-sex marriage," which takes advantage of an irresistible double-meaning in its title, Frank. Before he visits N.C. State on Monday for a conversation...

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Monday, February 9, 2015

Interview: Trying to keep up with prolific children's book author Gordon Korman

Posted By on Mon, Feb 9, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Gordon Korman Quail Ridge Books & Music Monday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m. Gordon Korman penned his first children’s book, This Can’t Be Happening at Macdonald Hall!, as a writing assignment in middle school—and has been publishing continuously ever since. The Canadian author earned a devoted cult following in the 1980s for his ability to capture the quirkiness of young adulthood in comic novels where offbeat protagonists—from the rebellious private-school students of the Macdonald Hall series and the hyperactive teen drummer Bugs Potter to the luckless Raymond Jardine of A Semester in the Life of a Garbage Bag and the “Attack...

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Monday, December 22, 2014

Gov. McCrory gets it right the second time around, names new N.C. Poet Laureate after controversy

Posted By on Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 3:01 PM

Call it poetic justice: After sparking controversy with his appointment of a questionably qualified state poet laureate in July, Gov. Pat McCrory announced in a press release today that the eminently qualified Shelby Stephenson will take the post. As the INDY wrote in July, Gov. McCrory’s abrupt, unilateral selection of state employee Valerie Macon as poet laureate caused an outcry in the state’s literary community—and beyond. Facing national scrutiny and criticism, Macon resigned after less than a week, leaving the post vacant until now. There were two reasons for the controversy over Macon’s appointment. For one, she lacked the legitimate publication and poetry...

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Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Nathaniel Mackey discusses the relationship between athletics and poetry

Posted By on Wed, Dec 10, 2014 at 12:44 PM

This week, we published a profile of Duke professor Nathaniel Mackey, one of the leading experimental lyric poets in the country, if not he world. We couldn’t fit in the following fascinating thoughts from Mackey on how the athletic activities of his school years may or may not influence his poetry, so we wanted to share them below. INDY: You played football in high school, and pole-vaulted in high school and college. Do athletics play any role in your poetics? NATHANIEL MACKEY: I don’t know. If so, then it’s very deep. There’s obviously a great psychic impact for me. Among...

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Friday, November 7, 2014

The Polar Express and Jumanji author Chris Van Allsburg respects the intelligence of young readers

Posted By on Fri, Nov 7, 2014 at 8:32 AM

Chris Van Allsburg Quail Ridge Books & Music Tuesday, Nov. 11, 7 p.m. It’s funny how easy it is to think of Chris Val Allsburg’s picture books as whimsical tales for children. Sure, Jumanji seems like a delightful romp about a jungle-themed board game whose obstacles come to life until the young players finish, and The Polar Express is about a magical visit to Santa’s workshop at the North Pole. But there’s something richer, more mysterious and darker beneath the surface, and that’s what has kept his books alive in the imaginations of a generation of children–and led many to...

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Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Interview: Back to the future with science-fiction legend William Gibson

Posted By on Wed, Nov 5, 2014 at 2:51 PM

Regulator Presents: William Gibson Motorco Music Hall Friday, Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m. $30 (admits two people and includes copy of book) William Gibson’s name will forever be linked to cyberpunk, the branch of science-fiction of which he was one of the prime architects. In his seminal 1984 novel Neuromancer, Gibson foresaw life in cyberspace with uncanny accuracy and no small amount of trepidation. He began as a sci-fi writer with literary leanings, but has grown over the decades into a fine literary writer who takes technology and speculative futures as his great themes. Following a trilogy of novels atypically set...

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Thursday, September 18, 2014

John Darnielle's Wolf in White Van longlisted for National Book Award

Posted By on Thu, Sep 18, 2014 at 2:38 PM

Success was a long time in coming to John Darnielle as a musician. Before his folk-rock project The Mountain Goats started edging toward household name (or at least major cult) status, he spent the 1990s releasing lo-fi cassettes and records for a small group of dedicated fans. But it looks like literary success will prove less elusive, as Darnielle's first proper novel, Wolf in White Van (which is discussed with the author and reviewed in this week's INDY), has just landed on the longlist for the 2014 National Book Awards for Fiction. About that "proper"—Wolf in White Van, which elliptically...

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Monday, September 15, 2014

Bull Spec officially retires as print magazine

Posted By on Mon, Sep 15, 2014 at 2:22 PM

For Triangle-based fans of science fiction, fantasy and horror, Durham’s Samuel Montgomery-Blinn has played a major role in raising awareness of and consolidating the rich local scene for these genres with his magazine and website Bull Spec since 2010. The INDY reported on it back when it was on its fourth issue in 2011. But after years of diligently promoting the books and films he loves, Montgomery-Blinn is cutting back … a bit. Bull Spec is officially retiring as a print periodical, though it will continue as a website and email newsletter.  The print version of Bull Spec has been a labor of love...

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Friday, July 18, 2014

Update: Valerie Macon resigns from Poet Laureate appointment after uproar

Posted By on Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 1:42 PM

Valerie Macon, appointed by Governor Pat McCrory as North Carolina's poet laureate last Friday, resigned her appointment Thursday. The North Carolina literary community noisily—and almost unanimously—objected to the virtually unknown Macon's appointment on the grounds that she was substantially unqualified for the honor and that her inexperience undermined the integrity of the office of laureate as well as the literary tradition of the state. Macon has self-published two books and lacks teaching or program facilitation experience, which are core duties of the poet laureate. Past laureates have all been substantially published poets with national reputations and decades of teaching experience...

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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Opinion: McCrory’s mean joke, a poet laureate who’s barely a poet

Posted By on Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 11:06 AM

Update: Valerie Macon has resigned. Who the hell is Valerie Macon? That’s what poets in North Carolina are asking this week after Gov. Pat McCrory bypassed the established process for choosing the state’s poet laureate and appointed the unknown, inexperienced Macon to the post for the next two years. Typically, the North Carolina Arts Council handles the selection of a new laureate. They solicit nominations, convene a selection committee to review the poets against the position’s guidelines and recommend a finalist to the Governor, who announces the new laureate. But McCrory couldn’t bother with that. Ignoring the NCAC’s process,...

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Hi Zack,

I'm reading this again after seeing it almost 5 months ago. Our new Quail Ridge Books is …

by Lisa Robie Poole on Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend (Arts)

Thanks RobU. This review ran online only.

by Brian Howe, INDY managing editor for arts & culture on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

Great review! Since it was out in previous paper, how do we get this in print? Possible to order it?

by RobU on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

This show is dreadful. I watched clips of the London production which lacked the wonderful sets in the Australian production. …

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Awesome summation of the beauty and skill surrounding this tap festival! Great Job Dan!
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Hi Zack,

I'm reading this again after seeing it almost 5 months ago. Our new Quail Ridge Books is …

by Lisa Robie Poole on Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend (Arts)

Thanks RobU. This review ran online only.

by Brian Howe, INDY managing editor for arts & culture on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

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