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Thursday, November 17, 2016

Gilbert Gottfried's Comedy Cuisine: A Slice of Pizza and a Grape Drink

Posted By on Thu, Nov 17, 2016 at 9:21 AM

Gilbert Gottfried Thursday, Nov. 17–Saturday, Nov. 19 Goodnights Comedy Club, Raleigh Comedian Gilbert Gottfried’s voice is one of the most recognizable in America, though his X-rated jokes stand in stark contrast with the hoarse shout that has given life to so many advertising and cartoon characters, including the parrot in Disney’s Aladdin. A veteran of stand-up since his teenage years, Gottfried joined the cast of Saturday Night Live in 1980 and then broke through into film, his outlandish humor earning him prominent roles in the Problem Child franchise and other slapstick comedies. Recently, in addition to voiceover and acting work,...

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Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Interview: Durham Author Travis Mulhauser on His Harshly Beautiful Debut Novel, Sweetgirl

Posted By on Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 1:30 PM

Sweetgirl By Travis Mulhauser Ecco/HarperCollins, Feb. 2016, 256 pp. Sweetgirl, the debut novel by Durham resident Travis Mulhauser, is a slow-burning yet electrifying tale set in the dead of winter in northern Michigan. On the cusp of a snowstorm, Percy, an intelligent and eloquent sixteen-year-old high school dropout, embarks to find her meth-addicted mother, who might be with Cutler County’s biggest scumbag, Shelton Potter. The long, winding course of Percy’s evening changes drastically when she finds a not-quite-abandoned baby in a house with two passed out addicts. What follows, in alternating chapters, is Percy’s attempt to rescue the baby...

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Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Interview: Actress and Poet Amber Tamblyn Surveys Hollywood's Toll on Women in Dark Sparkler

Posted By on Tue, Feb 23, 2016 at 12:02 PM

Amber Tamblyn Wednesday, Feb. 24, 7 p.m. The Regulator Bookshop You’ve probably seen Amber Tamblyn on TV—as a child actor on General Hospital, on her own show Joan of Arcadia, on the cult cop dramady The Unusuals (with Jeremy Renner), or in supporting roles in House and Two and a Half Men. Or maybe you’ve seen some of the many movies she’s been in, including the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants films. Tamblyn is also an accomplished poet with several published collections. Her latest, Dark Sparkler (Harper Perennial), was initially inspired by the abrupt death of Brittany Murphy. It’s a series...

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Thursday, January 21, 2016

Interview: Award-winning Raleigh poet Dorianne Laux on the unique writing community in North Carolina

Posted By on Thu, Jan 21, 2016 at 2:29 PM

Raleigh’s Dorianne Laux is the author of five books of poetry. Her most recent collection, The Book of Men, won the Paterson Prize. She has also won or been a finalist for the Best American Poetry Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Oregon Book Award and the Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize, among many other recognitions and fellowships. Born in Augusta, Maine, in 1952, Laux worked as a sanatorium cook, a gas-station manager, a maid and a donut-holer before receiving a BA in English from Mills College. After living and teaching in Oregon, Laux now lives with her husband,...

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Friday, August 7, 2015

North Carolina actor Anthony Reynolds on his role in the Fantastic Four reboot

Posted By on Fri, Aug 7, 2015 at 4:00 PM

TV and film actor Anthony Reynolds, who grew up in Cary and now lives in Wilmington, is happily typecast as a stone-faced military dude. His forte, as he describes it, is “cowboys, cops and killers.” After a small role as a helicopter pilot in Iron Man 3, he expands his superhero-movie résumé in director Josh Trank’s reboot of 20th Century Fox’s struggling Fantastic Four franchise, which opens nationwide today. In the film, a quartet of gifted young people (including actors Miles Teller and Michael B. Jordan) involved in a research program gain superpowers—and a whole lot of trouble from the...

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Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Interview: Comics writer Daniel Way on going indie again after superhero success

Posted By on Wed, Apr 15, 2015 at 10:01 AM

After getting his start in self-publishing, comics writer Daniel Way made his name in the mainstream superhero world, especially with a long run scripting the irreverent Marvel Comics character Deadpool, who is to be played by Ryan Reynolds in a feature film next year. But these days, Way is focused on his own, even more off-center creations—and living in Morrisville, to which he moved from Georgia about 18 months ago. He chose to bypass the big publishers and their distribution systems for his upcoming title, returning to his independent roots with the kind of sex-and-violence satire the mainstream usually avoids....

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Thursday, April 9, 2015

Interview: Barney Frank discusses his new memoir of a life in progressive politics

Posted By on Thu, Apr 9, 2015 at 3:26 PM

Barney Frank NCSU Hunt Library Auditorium Monday, April 13, 7 p.m. Former Massachusetts Congressman Barney Frank is known primarily for three things: Being the first openly gay member of the House of Representatives, co-sponsoring the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act after the 2008 financial crisis, and wielding a candid, sometimes lacerating sense of humor to win debates. All three entwine in his new memoir of "a life in politics from the Great Society to same-sex marriage," which takes advantage of an irresistible double-meaning in its title, Frank. Before he visits N.C. State on Monday for a conversation...

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Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Television: Twice Born follows challenging parental journey of Raleigh couple and others

Posted By on Wed, Apr 1, 2015 at 11:07 AM

Fetal surgery is barely 30 years old, with the first in utero intervention taking place in 1981. While breakthroughs in stem cell and gene therapy might some day make fetal surgery obsolete, today it remains a cutting-edge, highly sophisticated surgical procedure reserved for the most complex birth defects. The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is among the handful of medical facilities in the world that perform fetal surgeries. The hospital is also the setting for Twice Born: Stories from the Special Delivery Unit, a three-part documentary series premiering on PBS. The series primarily follows the experiences of four families at Children's...

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Monday, February 9, 2015

Interview: Trying to keep up with prolific children's book author Gordon Korman

Posted By on Mon, Feb 9, 2015 at 10:24 AM

Gordon Korman Quail Ridge Books & Music Monday, Feb. 9, 7 p.m. Gordon Korman penned his first children’s book, This Can’t Be Happening at Macdonald Hall!, as a writing assignment in middle school—and has been publishing continuously ever since. The Canadian author earned a devoted cult following in the 1980s for his ability to capture the quirkiness of young adulthood in comic novels where offbeat protagonists—from the rebellious private-school students of the Macdonald Hall series and the hyperactive teen drummer Bugs Potter to the luckless Raymond Jardine of A Semester in the Life of a Garbage Bag and the “Attack...

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Thursday, February 5, 2015

Catching up with John Woodard of Chapel Hill landmark Sutton's Drug Store

Posted By on Thu, Feb 5, 2015 at 11:30 AM

Hollie knows that I need cream for my coffee and that I don’t need syrup for my pancakes. “We haven’t seen you in a while,” she says. It’s been about a month. It seems I’m now a regular at Sutton’s food counter, and that I was missed. After the morning rush, owner John Woodard is also drinking coffee at the food counter. He looks great. Well rested. “That’s what people have been telling me,” he says. The sign above the front door still reads Sutton’s Drug Store, but it’s now a drug store in name only. Woodard was the pharmacist at...

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Thursday, January 29, 2015

Interview: A resurgent Paul Reiser on life after Mad About You

Posted By on Thu, Jan 29, 2015 at 11:23 AM

Paul Reiser The Carolina Theatre, Durham Saturday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m. Even Paul Reiser admits that he’ll probably always be most remembered for his Emmy-winning 1990s sitcom Mad About You, but the veteran actor, writer and comedian has enjoyed a renewed profile recently, including a supporting turn in Best Picture Oscar nominee Whiplash as well as roles on the FX series Married and Amazon’s Red Oaks—and now, a new stand-up comedy tour, coming to the Carolina Theatre this weekend. We recently spoke with Reiser about the surprise success of a small film, the changing entertainment business and whether he’s ready...

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Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Interview: Downton Abbey historical advisor Alastair Bruce visits the Triangle

Posted By on Tue, Dec 30, 2014 at 4:33 PM

When Downton Abbey premieres its anxiously anticipated fifth season on Sunday, Jan. 4, at 9:00 p.m. on UNC-TV, fans will revel in the lives and loves of the Earl of Grantham and his extended family—and the de facto family of servants with whom their lives are closely intertwined. But an important part of the show’s appeal is its meticulous attention to historical detail. For that, you can thank not just the pen of series creator Julian Fellowes, but also the strict yet kind supervision of historical advisor Alastair Bruce, OBE, Queen’s Herald, Territorial Army Colonel and Equerry to Prince Edward....

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Tuesday, December 9, 2014

The Return of Dr. Thunder: One cat’s journey from Texas to North Carolina to the afterlife—and back

Posted By , and on Tue, Dec 9, 2014 at 1:29 PM

There is something about cats that makes you ponder the uncanny. In "The Return of Dr. Thunder," Kellie Hamilton shares the story of how one cat traveled from Texas to North Carolina to the Great Beyond. And then, possibly, back again. We love the quirky humor of this story, and the gentle way that the narrator approaches it. The cat's owner later said that he felt silly revealing his belief in reincarnated pets, but as the ending shows, he's not the only one out there wondering if his cat is a part of something larger—some vast unknown, a cosmic cattery...

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Monday, September 1, 2014

Is the Hopscotch Design Festival for you?

Posted By on Mon, Sep 1, 2014 at 2:22 PM

Hopscotch Design Festival Sept. 3 and 4 Raleigh-wide If you’re a hardcore design head—architectural or digital, graphic or urban—then the new Hopscotch Design Festival, a collaboration between Hopscotch Music and Raleigh design firm New Kind, is a no-brainer. Following the music festival’s example, it brings more than 25 events with 36 local and national design leaders—from fields as diverse as video games, music and sustainable transit—to a walk-able spread of venues in downtown Raleigh. But for the casual observer, who is asked to pay $150 (or $75 as an add-on to a Hopscotch Music wristband) for two days of design...

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Monday, August 18, 2014

One: A Story of Love and Equality at the North Carolina Gay and Lesbian Film Festival

Posted By on Mon, Aug 18, 2014 at 12:49 PM

Brooklyn-based filmmaker Becca Roth had never actually been to North Carolina before starting work on her award-winning documentary One: A Story of Love and Equality, which chronicles her interactions with people on both sides of a controversial anti-gay-marriage constitutional amendment. Still, the state and its rocky history with gay rights had always intrigued her. “I had a friend from college who was from Hendersonville,” says Roth, “and she always talked about the difference between being in Hendersonville, having to be completely closeted, and going 30 minutes to Asheville, where you can do whatever you want. So I was interested in...

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Thursday, March 13, 2014

Elizabeth Streb: the INDY interview

Posted By on Thu, Mar 13, 2014 at 10:39 AM

STREB Extreme Action’s company name is truth in advertising: a group of seven superbly-trained athletes who propel themselves into harm’s way, repeatedly—against walls and floors, off of trampolines and multi-story trapeze-like platforms, into and out of close encounters with a spinning industrial I-beam as it careens across stage, and much, much more. In our Feb 17, 2010 story on the CHAT Festival at UNC-Chapel Hill, I described their edge-of-your-seat maneuvers, set to a pulsing techno soundtrack and accompanied by live and digitized video, as “a highly caffeinated remix of death-defying circus acts, gymnastics, motion-picture stunt work and modern dance." I...

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Monday, March 3, 2014

Neal Bell on In Secret, a new film adaptation of his stage play

Posted By on Mon, Mar 3, 2014 at 11:18 AM

After its professional New York premiere, it took almost 17 years for Neal Bell’s stage play Thérèse Raquin to make it to the big screen in the form of the recently-released In Secret, directed by Charlie Stratton and starring Elizabeth Olsen and Oscar Isaac. But for Bell, the result was worth the wait. “It’s exciting and strange,” says Bell, a professor of theater studies at Duke University. “I hadn’t seen the movie until it opened, so I didn’t know what to expect. But I was really surprised and delighted to see that it came out so well.” The film came about after...

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Wednesday, January 29, 2014

"A lot of the writing process is just radically preferring something to something else." George Saunders on writing

Posted By on Wed, Jan 29, 2014 at 12:43 PM

In anticipation of George Saunders' reading at Duke on Tuesday, Feb. 4, we called him at his Syracuse home for this long conversation about the art of writing, the life of the modern author and the “misfires of empathy” that comprise Tenth of December. The full transcript is below. Click here to return to the story that appeared in print. INDY: You’re known for a very recognizable, particular style. Is there anything that sets Tenth of December apart from your prior books, in terms of process or outcome? GEORGE SAUNDERS: After my previous book, I felt a little—not exactly blank,...

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Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Aaron Becker takes children on an illustrated Journey

Posted By on Wed, Jan 1, 2014 at 10:36 AM

Aaron Becker Journey Cover Aaron Becker has worked on such big-budget CGI-animated films as The Polar Express and A Christmas Carol. But for his first picture book, Journey (Candlewick Press, $15.99), he turned to a simpler, old-school format. Although he uses computer models of his landscapes to help figure out the look and lighting cues for his dream-like landscapes, the final results are less digital than manual. "The computer tends to be the beginning of the process, when I'm figuring out compositions, laying out scenes and stuff," says Becker on the phone from a visit to his family in...

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Friday, November 22, 2013

Author Jan Brett clucks up the Cinderella story with Cinders

Posted By on Fri, Nov 22, 2013 at 2:16 PM

If you ever want to get Jan Brett excited, ask her about her chickens. The award-winning author and illustrator’s tales often combine international settings and folklore with the interactions of the human and animal worlds. One such title was The Mitten. a retelling of a Ukrainian folk tale where forest animals come up with their own uses for a lost piece of winter clothing. Other tales have featured the likes of bears, dogs and hedgehogs that have received dozens of awards and reached the top spot on children’s bestseller lists. But she has a near-anthropological understanding of poultry that she’s...

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Friday, September 20, 2013

When Philadelphia destroyed a community of black radicals: Jason Osder talks about Let the Fire Burn

Posted By on Fri, Sep 20, 2013 at 12:05 PM

Last spring I covered the Tribeca film Festival for Documentary Magazine. I thought that the quality of documentary films was very strong. New HD cameras help to make the images sing, but the films that really jumped out at me relied heavily on archival footage. The most rigorous use of archival was seen in Jason Osder’s Let the Fire Burn, which relied exclusively on available footage. For me, it was also the standout film of the festival. Recently I traded emails with the director because I wanted to find out more about the film, but even more importantly I wanted...

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Friday, August 2, 2013

Paul Schrader on working with Lindsay Lohan and The Canyons

Posted By on Fri, Aug 2, 2013 at 5:14 PM

IFC FilmsJames Deen and Lindsay Lohan in The CanyonsPaul Schrader is one of the more intense members of the New Hollywood generation that emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s. He first attracted notice as a writer, producing the screenplays for Sydney Pollack's The Yakuza (1974) and Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver (1976). He moved quickly into directing, and became known for his gritty, uncompromising films. Even as filmmaking fashions came and went, and fundraising became ever more of a struggle, Schrader kept finding the means to make difficult films. In 2008, he made Adam Resurrected, a film about an...

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Friday, April 26, 2013

"The world's best artist" Mitch O'Connell brings modern kitsch to Raleigh

Posted By on Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 1:47 PM

Image provided by Mitch O'Connell Mitch O'Connell's colorful, crazed pop-art illustrations have appeared everywhere from the cover of Newsweek (four times) to a recent full-page story in The Wall Street Journal, but you'll have to forgive him for hoping for a good-sized turnout at his appearance at Nice Price Books in Raleigh on April 27. "I’ll be in North Carolina meeting my fiancé’s father," says O'Connell, on the phone from his home in Chicago. "My only goal is that hopefully a respectable line is in place to impress him. "So I impose this responsibility on the people of Raleigh—hopefully it’s...

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Monday, February 18, 2013

Brandon Sanderson finishes Robert Jordan's bestselling Wheel of Time Series with A Memory of Light

Posted By on Mon, Feb 18, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Imagine if J.K. Rowling had died before finishing Harry Potter, or if (as some fans fear) George R.R. Martin passes away before completing A Song of Ice and Fire, the bestselling series that’s also the basis for HBO’s Emmy-winning Game of Thrones. Now imagine you’re the one who has to come in, bring the epic to a satisfactory conclusion, resolve dozens of dangling plot threads, all while dealing with a passionate and demanding fan base who’ll never let you forget it if you fail. That was the challenge set before young writer Brandon Sanderson when he was called upon to...

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Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Three years after the earthquake, Durham's Jonathan M. Katz talks Haiti relief, the media and Sean Penn

Posted By on Wed, Feb 13, 2013 at 12:47 PM

Zach HetrickJonathan M. Katz Journalist Jonathan M. Katz, who currently resides in Durham, was the only full-time U.S. reporter in Haiti at the time of the 2010 earthquake. His experiences, not just during the immediate aftermath of the quake but over the next few years of relief efforts, are recounted in his new book, The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster (Palgrave Macmillan, $26.00), which he'll read tonight at Durham's Regulator Bookshop at 7 p.m. The book has received widespread acclaim for its insight into post-earthquake Haiti, and during...

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You stopped the arts coverage to cover the election..... You were probably better off just covering the arts, rather than …

by Matt Price on Will to Live Cautiously Returning? Here's a Few Things to Do This Week. (Arts)

Thanks for being there. You will be missed.

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