Arts | Indy Week
Arts
INDY Week's arts blog

Archives | RSS | Follow on

Saturday, February 26, 2011

TERMINUS impresses most when its rhymes impress us least

Posted By on Sat, Feb 26, 2011 at 7:03 PM

Catherine Walker, Declan Conlon and Olwen Fouere in Abbey Theatre's TERMINUSTERMINUS3.5 stars (out of 5)Abbey Theater of DublinDuke PerformancesCarolina Theatre If you want to explore some of the outer limits of theatrical discourse this evening, you now have two choices, not one. For as chance—and producers’ schedules—would have it, less than half a mile away from IN THE HEIGHTS’ amazing musical fusion of slam poetry, rap and meringue-edged songs at DPAC (which earned our latest 5-star review earlier this week), Dublin's Abbey Theatre pursues a different form of verbal gymnastics in a production of Irish dramatist Mark O’Rowe’s latest work,...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Q: Where's the future of the American musical?
A: IN THE HEIGHTS

Posted By on Sat, Feb 26, 2011 at 8:02 AM

IN THE HEIGHTS 5 stars (out of 5)Durham Performing Arts CenterThrough Feb. 27 It's a bracing—and rare—experience in this region's theater to stand at the end of a show and say, "Oh. So that's what the future looks like." It's happened twice now in the past month. Two weeks after the National Theater of Scotland's courageous production of BLACK WATCH showed the way forward for dramatic ensemble work, a touring production at Durham Performing Arts Center presents us with the future of American musical theater—or one of its futures, at any rate. The show's name is IN THE HEIGHTS. And...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, February 25, 2011

Local author Beth Revis takes readers Across the Universe at Quail Ridge Books

Posted By on Fri, Feb 25, 2011 at 3:40 PM

Visio PhotographyWith large displays at many bookshops, North Carolina native Beth Revis has gotten considerable buzz for her young adult science fiction novel Across the Universe (Razorbill, $17.99). And the roots of the former schoolteacher’s interstellar romance came from her time at NC State University. “When I went to NC State, my parents just dropped me off,” says Revis, who’ll appear with four other YA authors at Quail Ridge tonight as part of the “Breathless Reads” book tour. “With my main character, Amy, I was remembering what it was like to be alone in college," she says. "There’s a sense...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Monday, February 21, 2011

"Half of Silicon Valley has something you'd call Asperger's": Interview with Temple Grandin

Posted By on Mon, Feb 21, 2011 at 10:02 AM

Photo by Angus BremnerDiagnosed with autism early in her childhood, Temple Grandin’s seemingly improbable success as an animal behavior scientist and designer of livestock-handling equipment has made her a bestselling author and one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world for 2010. Later today, the 63-year-old author, scientist and advocate will speak at Duke University for the talk “My Experience with Animals.” Grandin, who received an honorary doctorate from Duke last year, spoke with us by telephone recently. “I talk a lot about visual thinking, and animal behavior, and trying to combining those things together, and how...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, February 18, 2011

Nevermore Film Festival celebrates 12th year with Hannibal Lecter and killer tires

Posted By on Fri, Feb 18, 2011 at 4:20 PM

Courtesy of Carolina TheatreDark SoulsIn its 12th year, the Nevermore Film Festival—which starts today and runs through Sunday—shows that the line between low-budget horror and “mainstream” cinema has all but vanished. There’s a number of recognizable actors in the lead of the newer films, and many of the international efforts included have already earned considerable cult buzz. There’s plenty of fun to be had with the older films—those who enjoyed Liam Neeson’s psycho ass-kicking in Taken or plan to see him in Unknown can enjoy him at his most over-the-top Neeson-est in 1990’s Darkman. Before he helmed the Spider-Man films,...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Emo Philips keeps it old school at NC Comedy Arts Festival

Posted By on Fri, Feb 18, 2011 at 11:14 AM

Photo by Andy HollingworthComedians are often friendly and thoughtful people in interviews, but rarely are they actually funny. But Emo Philips proves the exception to the rule, rambling off sometimes a dozen hilarious one-liners in the course of a single sentence. Here, for example, is his explanation as to why he’s playing the NC Comedy Arts Festival at Cat’s Cradle: “Well, about two years ago, I played Charlie Goodnight’s in Raleigh, and (festival creator) Zach Ward came up to me afterwards, and asked, ‘Would you like to play this festival?’ And I thought, ‘Boy, it’d be nice to play a...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Bobcat Goldthwait: More than just a "Grover voice" at Goodnight's

Posted By on Fri, Feb 18, 2011 at 10:39 AM

For a generation of comedy fans, Bobcat Goldthwait is known as that guy with the weird, grating, man-child voice—one he used to great effect alongside Bill Murray in Scrooged, John Cusack in One Crazy Summer and multiple Police Academy films as reformed gang leader Zed. But in recent years, the once larger-than-life Goldthwait is keeping it small. He’s gone from the guy who once set The Tonight Show guest chair on fire to the acclaimed writer-director of the small-scale, ribald and pitch-black comedies Sleeping Dogs Lie and World’s Greatest Dad. Still, his wild-man reputation persists. Not that Goldthwait—whose weekend gig...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Three leading poets appearing at Duke Friday—and why verse-lovers need to knock off work early

Posted By on Thu, Feb 17, 2011 at 3:29 PM

If you are a poet, then you need to knock off work early this Friday, Feb. 18. Eileen Myles, William Corbett and Ed Roberson—three of the more fascinating and talented poets in the country—are at Duke University for an afternoon panel discussion and evening reading. Both events are free and open to the public. Sponsored by the university’s English Department as part of the Blackburn Visiting Writers Series, the panel discussion will take place in the Breedlove Room of Perkins Library on West Campus this afternoon from 2:30-4:30. The reading will begin at 8 p.m. in the parlor of the...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Bye-bye Borders: Superstore files Chapter 11, Triangle stores to close in next several weeks

Posted By on Wed, Feb 16, 2011 at 12:14 PM

Today , the troubled books retail giant Borders filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The long-expected move means 200 stores will close, including four stores in the Triangle. According to documents filed in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Southern District of New York, stores in Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Cary and Apex will all close as part of Borders' restructuring. The Borders in Greensboro will also close. Borders' North Raleigh location at 8825 N. Six Forks Road will remain open, as will the stall at Raleigh-Durham International Airport. Borders announced today that it had secured $505 million in debt financing to help...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Frasier and Spamalot star David Hyde Pierce takes spotlight at PlayMakers

Posted By on Sat, Feb 12, 2011 at 7:27 AM

Photo by Joan MarcusOn the phone to discuss his receiving the PlayMakers Distinguished Achievement Award at the Carolina Inn on Saturday, Feb. 12, David Hyde Pierce shows little of the stuffy, obtuse uptightness he became famous for over 11 seasons as Niles Crane on TV’s Frasier. But the character’s fierce intelligence is on display as the four-time Emmy winner rapturously discusses his first love—the stage. Pierce, a Tony winner for 2007’s Curtains, first came to PlayMakers last year, when his longtime partner, UNC graduate Brian Hargrove (a long-time TV writer for such shows as Titus), was honored. Since Frasier ended...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, February 11, 2011

Woodpecker deserves more than cult status; brilliant new film plays one night-only at CDS

Posted By on Fri, Feb 11, 2011 at 11:58 AM

On Friday night, WOODPECKER, Alex Karpovsky’s low-key, hilarious “ficumentary,” screens at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham. The screening is part of the Southern Circuit Filmmakers tour, which mostly features documentaries, with the occasional fiction film thrown into the mix. Genre-wise, Woodpecker throws a curve of its own, with a concocted plot about a pair of intrepid birdwatchers threaded through a conventional documentary about the fabled ivory-billed woodpecker, a species thought to be extinct until sightings began to crop up in the Arkansas bayou in 2004. Still from Woodpecker...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, February 10, 2011

An all-out assault on political—and artistic—complacency: BLACK WATCH at Memorial Hall

Posted By on Thu, Feb 10, 2011 at 3:42 PM

Photo by Manuel HarlanBLACK WATCH5 stars (out of 5)National Theatre of Scotland@Memorial Hall, UNC Chapel HillThrough Feb. 13 Rumor confirmed: The National Theatre of Scotland’s production of BLACK WATCH, in residence at UNC’s Memorial Hall through Sunday, Feb. 13, is easily the strongest show of the season—and, hands down, one of the strongest productions this region has seen over the past decade. Though the Carolina Performing Arts website indicated the entire run was sold out on Wednesday, as we post this a few more tickets have been released for each performance. Even if they sell out, as they likely will,...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Practical Magic author Alice Hoffman discusses new book, North Carolina

Posted By on Wed, Feb 9, 2011 at 7:46 AM

Photo by Deborah FeingoldIt’s not unusual for an acclaimed author to make an appearance at a Triangle bookstore, but Alice Hoffman is going the extra mile to promote her new novel The Red Garden with consecutive appearances at four Triangle book stores over three days, starting tonight in Durham. “It seems like North Carolina is a land of independent bookstores, more than most places,” says Hoffman, who credits positive experiences signing at Quail Ridge and the Regulator in the past for her extended stay. “I felt like I wanted to spend some time there.” The Red Garden consists of a...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

"Journal of a UFO Investigator": David Halperin, UNC Religion Professor, reads from his debut novel tonight at Flyleaf

Posted By on Tue, Feb 8, 2011 at 3:45 PM

With each passing year of the intensive summer writing camp I co-direct, our high schoolers are writing more stories about misfit adolescents who find social acceptance in secretive cults: ninjas, vampires, cabals apparently devoted to candlelit backstabbing. Their stories are wildly imaginative, apocalyptic, futuristic yet noirish. The trend owes much, of course, to Harry Potter and Twilight, which are inscribed in the Net Generation’s literary DNA. More fundamentally, though, it reflects a basic psychic condition of adolescence, one that has probably deepened with the cloistered alienation of the Internet: I hate where I am, no one is like me and...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Saturday, February 5, 2011

A Tarot deck of dances? Doug Varone's Chapters from a Broken Novel, tonight at NC State

Posted By on Sat, Feb 5, 2011 at 10:54 AM

from Doug Varone's "Chapters from a Broken Novel"A person who sits for a conventional tarot reading knows several things. If that Rider-Waite deck hasn’t changed in the century since it was crafted, the archetypes depicted in its major arcana have basically been fixed for a half-millennium. No one snuck a card in last week depicting your favorite uncle or your most detested boss; a photo of your first love, your first car, or your first beer isn’t going to dramatically appear face up as the cards are dealt. And yet. A finite cast of characters and symbols set on 78...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Positive images: Documenting chemotherapy with archaic photography techniques

Posted By on Sat, Feb 5, 2011 at 10:31 AM

Photo by Willie OstermanChemoToxicAmbrotype photographs by Willie OstermanDurhamThrough This Lens GalleryThrough March 12 “I photograph because I don’t understand something, or I’m curious about something, or want to learn about something,” Willie Osterman says. In the case of cancer, one’s body is what’s not understood, to the specific extent that it becomes an enemy. In CHEMOTOXIC, a show of 27 ambrotypes at Durham’s Through This Lens gallery through March 12, Osterman’s photographs document his wife Michele’s chemotherapy and recovery from cancer, and also draw a new kind of connection between the camera and the body. Michele was diagnosed on Valentine’s...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

A bittersweet homecoming for the Merce Cunningham Dance Company

Posted By on Sat, Feb 5, 2011 at 1:40 AM

MERCE CUNNINGHAM DANCE COMPANYPresented by Duke Performances@Durham Performing Arts CenterFeb. 4-5 The Durham Performing Arts Center was energized Friday night with the North Carolina homecoming of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company. Cunningham founded the company in 1953 at Black Mountain College in western North Carolina; he died a year and a half ago, and his will outlined plans for a final two-year tour for his company, which will disband for good in December. Though turnout on Friday night was modest, those who did turn out were treated to a spectacular farewell for the storied troupe, which will perform one...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, February 3, 2011

From the archives: Merce Cunningham—an interview and review

Posted By on Thu, Feb 3, 2011 at 11:14 PM

Two stories from the archives, before this weekend's performances by the MERCE CUNNINGHAM DANCE COMPANY on its farewell "Legacy Tour," for those seeking further background on his work: a revealing interview from last summer with Cunningham dancer and dance reconstructor JEAN FREEBURY, followed by an earlier critical review from his company's last appearance at the American Dance Festival. Cunningham dancer and reconstructor Jean FreeburyLast summer, ADF belatedly asked Freebury to place his ISLETS 2 on students over six weeks. After dancing with Merce’s company from 1992 to 2003, she has taught his work now for 15 years. In our July...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Angels in America: We can't talk about it, but you can...

Posted By on Wed, Feb 2, 2011 at 6:22 PM

PlayMakers photo by Jon GardinerMatthew Carlson and Marianne Miller in Angels in AmericaThe good side? Another theater season, another blockbuster-level show as ANGELS IN AMERICA gets underway at PlayMakers Rep. The questionable side? For the second season running, PlayMakers' performance schedule for said blockbuster creates—oops!—an embargo that essentially keeps the region's critics gagged during the first two weeks of the run. As they say, once is an accident. Twice... and it begins to look like company policy. The still unfolding story of SPIDERMAN: TURN OFF THE DARK has raised a number of potentially useful questions. Just how "sacred" should preview...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Calendar



Twitter Activity

Comments

Amy Schumer really,really, sucks as a comedian. How told her she was good as an actress?
If you took notice …

by rgj5366 on Movie review: Amy Schumer's brilliant sketch comedy goes off the rails in Trainwreck (Arts)

Haven't seen it yet, but here's a contrasting take from an insightful critic:
http://nyr.kr/1Dno95a …

by lxxxvc on Movie review: Amy Schumer's brilliant sketch comedy goes off the rails in Trainwreck (Arts)

Most Read

© 2015 Indy Week • 201 W. Main St., Suite 101, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation