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Wednesday, April 28, 2010

The Dark side of the Internet, revisited: Dark Play at REP

Posted By on Wed, Apr 28, 2010 at 12:26 PM

photo courtesy REPChris Milner, Ryan Brock, and Hazel Edmond in REP's Dark PlayDARK PLAY, or STORIES FOR BOYS4 StarsRaleigh Ensemble PlayersThrough May 2 byron.woods@gmail.comTwitter: @byronwoods Facebook: arts.byron.woods Once it was believed that the Internet would connect us together, individually as well as a culture, in ways unimagined before—and in some ways, it has. But it has also repeatedly proven a hunting ground where the unwary have found their identities, emotions and bodies manipulated, hijacked or broadcast, worldwide. Now that a generation has grown up online, research is beginning to trickle in detailing exactly what all those daily hours on Facebook,...

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Sunday, April 25, 2010

A Wickedly entertaining modern-day political allegory: Wicked at DPAC

Posted By on Sun, Apr 25, 2010 at 2:25 PM

photo by Joan MarcusDon Amendolia as the Wizard of Oz in WickedWicked 4.5 starsDPACThrough May 16 By now, they’re the kind of marketing metaphors we’ve all probably become numb to: Arnold Schwarzenegger is the Terminator. Christian Bale is Batman. Reese Witherspoon is Legally Blonde. But having seen the professional touring version of the Broadway musical, WICKED (actually, Professional Touring Company #2) at Durham Performing Arts Center, I’ve got a new one to shake things up a little: Dick Cheney IS the Wizard of Oz. Here’s a photo of actor Don Amendola, who plays the famous sorcerer (and humbug) in this...

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Thursday, April 22, 2010

Textiles’ seniors show off their skills, but don't say "like"

Posted By on Thu, Apr 22, 2010 at 12:49 PM

Photo courtesy of Kristen DePalmoHalf of Kristen DePalmo's garments await public display. “You do not ‘like that one,'” a sign in North Carolina State University’s Leazar studio sternly admonishes inquisitive visitors who might want to express appreciation for a design piece. Across campus at the College of Textiles, the same sentiment prevails during class critiques of the Senior Fashion Collection Studio. “You can’t use the word ‘like’,” Cynthia Istook, associate professor of textile and apparel management and senior studio teacher, said. Instead, class members can make suggestions about changing a piece, and the designer can choose whether or not to...

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Wednesday, April 21, 2010

A conversation with famed children's book author Lois Lowry

Posted By on Wed, Apr 21, 2010 at 7:50 AM

Neil GiordanoLois LowryOn the phone from Boston, Lois Lowry calls her latest novel The Birthday Ball a “silly little book,” wonders if she should have expanded the last section of her novel The Giver, and asks if the new crop of children’s and young adult authors have rendered her obsolete. Her modesty is hardly deserved. Since her first children’s book, A Summer to Die, came out in 1977, Lowry has become one of the top children’s and young adult authors in the world, averaging about a book a year in a plethora of genres ranging from humor to drama to...

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Tuesday, April 20, 2010

A Master Class in Artistic Survival: SECCA at Burning Coal

Posted By on Tue, Apr 20, 2010 at 12:47 PM

Aaron Mills & PJ Maske in SECCASoutheastern Center for Contemporary Arts (SECCA)4 StarsBurning Coal TheatreThrough May 1 It had been a long day of rehearsals. Thankfully the show had reached its continental divide several days before: that meridian every production crosses—every fortunate one, at least—where the thought of roomfuls of strangers seeing what you’ve done no longer fills you with horror, but hope instead. A film-based monthly we’d done an in-trade ad with had invited us to a party. A trendy downtown club was hosting the new head of local ops for Screen Gems: Yeah, kind of a big deal...

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Saturday, April 17, 2010

Redress Raleigh: Not just fashion as usual

Posted By on Sat, Apr 17, 2010 at 11:17 AM

Photo courtesy of Margo Scott, Rocket Betty DesignsOne of designer Margo Scott's tiki-inspired creations. Green, sustainable fashion is so hot right now. But residents of the Triangle don’t have to jet to New York or Los Angeles to see it (which is good, since the goal is to reduce the carbon footprint). This weekend, they can head into downtown Raleigh to see local eco-friendly fashion. Mor Aframian initially founded MorLove, a nonprofit with proceeds going to aid orphans at the Amani Baby Cottage in Jinga, Uganda. She met Jamie Powell, who had participated in a MorLove fashion show in 2008....

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Friday, April 16, 2010

Art to Wear: Prepping for The Big Strut

Posted By on Fri, Apr 16, 2010 at 10:04 AM

Photo by Sarah EwaldDesigner Gennie Catastrophe chats with her models before showing her collection onstage at Reynolds Coliseum. Audience members cheered and roared for N.C. State’s student designers and models Wednesday night in Reynolds Coliseum. But what the audience never sees is how much hairspray, cookies and ironing go into putting that line out on the runway. I shadowed designer Gennie Catastrophe and her models in the hours before as they prepared for their moment in the spotlight. 2:15 p.m.: I arrive at eco-friendly Bottega-A Hair Studio on Glenwood Avenue, where Catastrophe has scheduled her models for their hair and...

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Wednesday, April 14, 2010

Art to Wear: A mid-summer forest and a mental ward

Posted By on Wed, Apr 14, 2010 at 11:14 AM

Photo by Sarah EwaldDesigner Eleanor Hoffman works on her collection in Leazar studio. When showing a collection, a designer’s job is to take the audience into his or her own created world. Two designers in this year’s Art to Wear (A2W) are pulling from different locales to put their looks in proper context. Designer Eleanor Hoffman’s collection stems from images of mirrors, moonlight and circles. Two poems, Lorenzo Smerillo’s Maze and Maria Taylor’s Birmingham 1982, serve as initial inspiration points, tacked on the wall above her work space’s sewing machine for easy reference, along with pieces of fabric cut in...

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Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Home is Far Too Many Stories: Hidden Voices at ArtsCenter

Posted By on Tue, Apr 13, 2010 at 11:27 PM

Home is Not One Story2 StarsHidden VoicesClosed Apr. 10 Byron Woodsbyron@indyweek.comTwitter: @byronwoods Facebook: arts.byron.woods In a recent review I decried a production that, like humanity in the famous T.S. Eliot quote, could not “bear very much reality.” Unfortunately, Home is Not One Story, the latest stage production by Hidden Voices at The ArtsCenter, is its diametrical opposite: a work that bears entirely too much. Since their first productions in 2003-4, I have followed the Voices with deep interest, praising their previous endeavors that effectively lifted the voices and visibility of communities at the margins of our society—works that fully earned...

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Sunday, April 11, 2010

Art to Wear: “We’re in the water and we’re really cold”

Posted By on Sun, Apr 11, 2010 at 3:48 PM

Photo by Sarah EwaldDesigner Natalie Bunch works on her collection at Leazar studio. Some designers in this year’s Art to Wear show are taking inspiration from the elements. Two designers in particular are working with water. Natalie Bunch, a landscape architecture major in the College of Design, was specifically drawn to water’s various properties when she studied in Ghana last summer. Her studio was focused on observations dealing with solutions on improving the environmental systems. She cites drainage canals along every street and trash dumps lining the beach, and how the Ghanaian population connected water systems with sewage systems. Bunch...

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Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar: The Indy interview

Posted By on Sun, Apr 11, 2010 at 1:37 PM

Full FrameA scene from Ramin Bahrani's Man Push Cart, shown at Full Frame as part of the curated series on workIndy contributor olufunke moses wrote a piece discussing the curated series of work-related films at Full Frame. Her story, in which she interviewed the filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steven Bognar, who programmed the 18 films seen this weekend, appears here. Bognar and Reichert's most recent effort, the 40-minute-long The Last Truck, follows the closing of GM's assembly plant in Moraine, Ohio, and was shown as an invited film at this weekend's Full Frame fest. Bognar and Reichert's other work includes...

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Saturday, April 10, 2010

Do it Again, Again: The full text of the Indy interview with Geoff Edgers

Posted By on Sat, Apr 10, 2010 at 12:55 PM

Full FrameZooey Deschanel charms Geoff Edgers in Do It AgainFriday night at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, Robert Patton-Spruill's Do It Again: One Man's Quest to Reunite the Kinks played to a packed Fletcher Hall. Patton-Spruill and his film's titular character, longtime music reporter Geoff Edgers, took the stage afterward for questions. Edgers asked audience members to record the proceedings with their smart phones and email the videos and photos to him so he could pass them on to his wife, Carlene—seen extensively in the film, she is nearly full-term with the couple's second child. Edgers also revealed that...

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Sunday, April 4, 2010

Art to Wear: Meet two designers

Posted By on Sun, Apr 4, 2010 at 10:38 PM

Photo by Sarah EwaldArt to Wear designer Hannah Goff works on her collection in her Raleigh studio. We’re less than two weeks away from the Art to Wear (A2W) show at N.C. State’s Reynolds Coliseum, and we’ll take a look at two designers who are preparing their collections for the show. Hannah Goff, a fashion development major at N.C. State’s College of Textiles (COT), found out about A2W when she attended the show as a freshman. Goff is an old hand at participating in fashion shows: She also designed for the eco-fashion recycling project MorLove, founded by fellow COT student...

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Saturday, April 3, 2010

Director's double duty blurs "Sty of the Blind Pig"

Posted By on Sat, Apr 3, 2010 at 9:48 PM

The Sty of the Blind Pig2 stars Shaw Players and CompanyMeymandi Theater, Murphey School, Polk Street.Through Closed Apr. 4, 2010 Byron Woodsbwoods@indyweek.com Twitter: @byronwoods Facebook: arts.byron.woods There’s just one problem with that second scene in Act II of Sty of the Blind Pig, Phillip Dean's 1971 Chicago domestic tenement drama which closed with an Easter Sunday matinee at Burning Coal’s Meymandi Theater. When a scene works as fiercely as that one does, you want every other moment in the show to be just as memorable. Alberta, the largely joyless adult daughter of self-righteous busybody Weedy Warren, is recalling the funeral...

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Hi Zack,

I'm reading this again after seeing it almost 5 months ago. Our new Quail Ridge Books is …

by Lisa Robie Poole on Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend (Arts)

Thanks RobU. This review ran online only.

by Brian Howe, INDY managing editor for arts & culture on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

Great review! Since it was out in previous paper, how do we get this in print? Possible to order it?

by RobU on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

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by mrappleby on Love never dies, but many terrible musicals have: Sitting through Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom sequel. (Arts)

Awesome summation of the beauty and skill surrounding this tap festival! Great Job Dan!
Annabel's mom💕 …

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Comments

Hi Zack,

I'm reading this again after seeing it almost 5 months ago. Our new Quail Ridge Books is …

by Lisa Robie Poole on Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend (Arts)

Thanks RobU. This review ran online only.

by Brian Howe, INDY managing editor for arts & culture on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

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