Arts | Indy Week
Arts
INDY Week's arts blog

Archives | RSS | Follow on

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

One-man "Gospel of John" show plays Chapel Hill Friday. Too bad its playbill and Web site bear false witness...

Posted By on Wed, Mar 31, 2010 at 1:41 AM

Brad Sherrill in "The Gospel of John"The Gospel of JohnUniversity United Methodist ChurchApril 2, 7 p.m.www.chapelhilluumc.org/uumc/tickets It happens every so often in this business: A company just a little too desperate for praise distorts a critical review in its publicity for a show, by cherry-picking a positive word or phrase out of an article that's just a bit more…qualified in its endorsement. But somehow, one expects Christian actors performing Christian drama to be...above that sort of thing. (Perhaps that has something to do with the penalties reserved for bearing false witness, lies or perjury—extreme examples of which are littered through...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Is "A Remarkable Document" Remarkable Enough?

Posted By on Sat, Mar 27, 2010 at 7:13 PM

Actor Joy JonesI Have Before Me A Remarkable Document Given to Me by a Young Lady from Rwanda3 1/2 starsPRC 2Kenan Theater, UNC Through Mar. 28 Usually, determining a play’s subject is something of a preliminary task: one that leads us, more or less directly, into deeper critical waters. But within the past week, two productions—MoLoRa (Ash) at Duke and I Have Before Me a Remarkable Document Given to Me by a Young Lady from Rwanda at UNC—have stopped me at what is usually a fairly neutral border in my critical walk. In both cases, it wasn’t enough to ask...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Art to Wear: This one will go down in history

Posted By on Thu, Mar 25, 2010 at 12:07 PM

Where there's fashion, you can reliably find people who adore the industry, and worship it with every fiber of their being. But you can also meet people whose interest might be surprising, until it starts to make sense For example, Sean Avery, a hockey player for the New York Rangers, interned at Vogue in the summer of 2008 and now aspires for the plush life of the fashion editorial after he hangs up his skates. OK, Avery is an extreme example, but N.C. State's Art to Wear show has to grapple with aspirants who come from outside the departments...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

Strong musicianship lifts Savoyards' Mikado

Posted By on Wed, Mar 24, 2010 at 11:23 PM

The Mikado 3 1/2 stars Durham Savoyards Carolina Theatre (closed March 21) Call the Durham Savoyards a theatrical anachronism—if you dare. For the truth is this: At this writing, over 50 such companies in the United States (and another 100 or so, back in Britain) exist to do one thing only—cart the lot of us back to the last two decades of the 1800s, and plant us in the boxes of the Savoy Theater of London, as William S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan employ classically-trained musicians and singers to ever-so-gently ridicule the absurdities of Victorian culture. Gilbert’s penchant for...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, March 19, 2010

Art to Wear grads: Where are they now?

Posted By on Fri, Mar 19, 2010 at 4:05 PM

Traditionally, participating in a school fashion show has proved to be a great way to launch one's career. In 1995, Stella McCartney inaugurated her first line while attending England's celebrated Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. And when another of that school's students unveiled his work, the eccentric socialite Isabella Blow bought each piece of the graduation collection. The student's name? The great-and now late-visionary Alexander McQueen. Among these parts, Art to Wear is no exception in that regard. Previous designers have gone on to such varied fields as graduate school, arts management and design for companies...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Solo show about women reclaiming their bodies at Common Ground

Posted By on Thu, Mar 18, 2010 at 11:42 AM

'rie Shontel's Mama Juggs: Three Generations Healing Negative Body Images ** Common Ground Theatre March 19-20; rieshontel.blogspot.com 'rie Shontel's autobiographical theater work is a strange amalgam of comedy, pathos and public service announcement. Set in a shabby Oakland, CA, public housing living room where she grew up, which is oddly draped with a small fortune in brand-new bras, Mama Juggs is a series of related skits about the author and her family, focused on breasts, their life-giving force and their death-dealing disease. This is certainly fertile ground for theatrical exploration, but Shontel does not take it very far-however, if you...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

MoLoRa: The Independent Interview with Yael Farber

Posted By on Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 12:37 PM

After creating a series of "testimonial plays" based on South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the 1990s, playwright Yael Farber approached a group of women from the Xhosa people in 2008, and told them the story of The Oresteia. The Greek tragic trilogy still confronts us with dilemmas our civilization hasn't fully solved. How do we distinguish justice from vengeance? What is the appropriate punishment for murder? And once "eye for an eye" violence is ingrained in a culture, how can it be stopped? At the time she was looking for umngqokolo—traditional overtone throat singing for her new project. But...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

The Mikado cast prepares for opening night

Posted By on Wed, Mar 17, 2010 at 12:25 PM

CAROLINA THEATRE/ DURHAM—Ask any high-school theater geek, and they'll have heard of Gilbert and Sullivan. Ask me, I was one. But amazingly, I graduated high school and went all through college without once seeing one of their plays or hearing any of the songs. All of that changed when I attended a rehearsal for The Mikado, performed by the Durham Savoyards. Founded in 1963, the troupe is dedicated to performing solely Gilbert and Sullivan standards. While they rotate through a number of titles, they return to the more popular ones more frequently. This outing marks director Derrick Ivey's second...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Tuesday, March 9, 2010

Art to Wear: A brief history

Posted By on Tue, Mar 9, 2010 at 8:47 AM

As veteran broadcaster Ron Burgundy of Anchorman might say, North Carolina State University's Art to Wear fashion show is kind of a big deal. People know it and mark their calendars for what's become known as a reliable showcase of talent. The annual fashion show, put on by the College of Design (COD) and College of Textiles (COT), has made quite a mark in the burgeoning Raleigh fashion scene. "People [tend to] stake out their seats hours beforehand," says Vita Plume, COD art and design teacher and Art to Wear faculty advisor. Plume was the sole advisor until COT...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Friday, March 5, 2010

Jodi Picoult discusses Asperger syndrome and her new novel, House Rules

Posted By on Fri, Mar 5, 2010 at 6:08 PM

On the phone about her appearance at Meredith College on March 8, Jodi Picoult is friendly, bubbly and frequently laughing. There's no indication of the misery and tragedy visited upon the characters in her best-selling novels, including My Sister's Keeper, Handle With Care and her latest, House Rules, which hit bookstores on Tuesday. Picoult's novels often involve such horrors as school shootings, execution, infanticide, date rape, sexual abuse, suicide pacts and more. The tales frequently combine courtroom drama with deeply flawed characters that don't always make it through the story intact. (On the other hand, last year's film of...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Literary event of the night: Ex-Harpers editor Roger Hodge to discuss his "rise and fall" tonight at CDS

Posted By on Fri, Mar 5, 2010 at 4:59 PM

If you haven't heard of Roger D. Hodge, you're likely familiar with the magazine he used to edit: Harpers Magazine.The 43 year old, who first began working at Harpers as a fact checker in 1996, was recently sacked from the editorship, which he assumed in 2006. Why was he canned? Well, that's the subject of tonight's event, which bears the perhaps intentionally florid title of "My Rise and Fall: Roger Hodge on the State of Magazines." Tonight at the Center for Documentary Studies, Hodge will engage in a public conversation with Duncan Murrell, a Pittsboro writer and teacher who has...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Thursday, March 4, 2010

More Full Frame sked: Soderbergh; Hegedus-Pennebaker; Steve James/Allen Iverson; Thelonious Monk film

Posted By on Thu, Mar 4, 2010 at 4:29 PM

More programming news from Full Frame: Fourteen invited, out-of-competition films were named today. The short version: It's going to be a good festival. No Crossover, Steve James' Allen Iverson film, made for ESPN, that explores a controversial incident in his high school years that did much to establish his outlaw image And Everything is Going Fine, Steven Soderbergh's film about the late monologist Spalding Gray, who died by suicide six years ago PELADA, a soccer documentary partly produced by Duke graduates that is receiving its world premiere this month at South by Southwest in Austin, Texas A profile of the...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Notes from IgniteRaleigh: To be a spark, and not to be rickrolled

Posted By on Thu, Mar 4, 2010 at 10:34 AM

Important takeaways from last night's IgniteRaleigh 2, held Wednesday night in Lincoln Theatre: Raleigh boasts the third-highest concentration of modernist homes behind Los Angeles and Chicago, there is only one female boxer action figure and sexting is beneficial for relationships. The unique event—and those very random facts—was part of Global Ignite Week, a social media meme turned PowerPoint phenomenon that spans 60 cities on six continents. Similar to speed dating for the tech set, Raleigh's version featured 19 presenters who each had five minutes and 20 slides that automatically advanced every 20 seconds to present an idea, story or...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

2010 Full Frame lineup announced: Alex Gibney's Abramoff film and more

Posted By on Wed, Mar 3, 2010 at 5:31 PM

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival announced its new docs competition lineup for next month's festival, which runs April 8–11 in downtown Durham. The full lineup is below, but our initial scan reveals a couple of names well known to festival fans, including Alex Gibney (Taxi to the Dark Side; Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room) and Laura Poitras (Flag Wars; My Country, My Country). The former's film is on the notorious lobbyist Jack Abramoff, called Casino Jack and the United States of Money. Poitras' film looks to be equally timely and topical: It's called The Oath, and it...

Continue reading…

  • Pin It

Calendar



Twitter Activity

Most Recent Comments

Hi Zack,

I'm reading this again after seeing it almost 5 months ago. Our new Quail Ridge Books is …

by Lisa Robie Poole on Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend (Arts)

Thanks RobU. This review ran online only.

by Brian Howe, INDY managing editor for arts & culture on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

Great review! Since it was out in previous paper, how do we get this in print? Possible to order it?

by RobU on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

This show is dreadful. I watched clips of the London production which lacked the wonderful sets in the Australian production. …

by mrappleby on Love never dies, but many terrible musicals have: Sitting through Andrew Lloyd Webber's Phantom sequel. (Arts)

Awesome summation of the beauty and skill surrounding this tap festival! Great Job Dan!
Annabel's mom💕 …

by Dcable on Dance Review: Tap Genius Michelle Dorrance Brings It Home at the NC Rhythm Tap Festival (Arts)

Comments

Hi Zack,

I'm reading this again after seeing it almost 5 months ago. Our new Quail Ridge Books is …

by Lisa Robie Poole on Remembering Quail Ridge Books Founder Nancy Olson, a Reader's Best Friend (Arts)

Thanks RobU. This review ran online only.

by Brian Howe, INDY managing editor for arts & culture on Theater Review: Three Shakespeare Plays Are Pared Down to a Ninety-Minute Game of Dramatic Chess in Henry VI (Arts)

Most Read

© 2016 Indy Week • 201 W. Main St., Suite 101, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation