Wiley Cash wins first Crook’s Corner Book Prize | Food | Indy Week
Food
INDY Week's food blog

Archives | RSS

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Wiley Cash wins first Crook’s Corner Book Prize

Posted by on Tue, Jan 7, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Wiley Cash - TIFFANY B. DAVIS
  • Tiffany B. Davis
  • Wiley Cash
Wiley Cash of Wilmington, author of A Land More Kind Than Home, was celebrated Monday night at Crook’s Corner as the inaugural recipient of the famed Chapel Hill eatery’s namesake book prize. 

The contest was open to first-time novelists whose published works were set in the South. More than 100 writers from across the country competed for the prize, which confers $1,000 cash, bragging rights and, in the fashion of Parisian literary cafes, a glass of wine a day for a year at Crook’s.

“It’s just such a fine novel, period. But for it to be a first novel, I think it really knocks it out of the park,” says best-selling author Jill McCorkle, who picked the winning entry from a field of four finalists. “Also, I’m a sucker for a child narrator. I think it is hard to walk that line, but he never once fell off that tightrope.”

McCorkle is a professor of creative writing at N.C. State University and a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. She said that all four finalists produced exceptional books, but Cash stood out for “what he had taken on in terms of point of view and weaving everyone’s history into place. He gave himself a very difficult assignment. It was very ambitious and completely successful.”

Cash’s novel has been described as a tragic ballad rooted in the unquestioning faith of a small community in the mountains of western North Carolina. The New York Times chose it as “Notable Book of the 
wiley_cash-book_jacket.jpg
Year” for 2013, describing it as “mesmerizing … [an] intensely felt and beautiful story.”

For his well-drawn sense of place, Wiley earned rapturous comparisons to Flannery O’Connor and William Faulkner. The Richmond Times-Dispatch took its description of the chilling page-turner a step further: “[It] reads a little as if Cormac McCarthy decided to rewrite Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird.”

McCorkle says Cash represents a distinct voice in new Southern literature. She was similarly impressed with his second novel, This Dark Road to Mercy.

“Wiley Cash is the kind of writer who could take you into any situation. These people happen to be Southern, but emotionally, these stories could be anywhere,” she says. “I’m always looking for that story that transcends the place and the period to deliver an emotional truth that anybody, anywhere would understand. I think that’s the goal of fiction.”

Entries are now being accepted for the second annual Crook’s Corner Book Prize, which will be judged by writer Randall Kenan. Author of the award-winning Let the Dead Bury Their Dead, Kenan is a professor of creating writing at UNC Chapel Hill.

Jill Warren Lucas is a freelance writer in Raleigh who blogs at Eating My Words. Follow her at @jwlucasnc.

Tags: , , ,

Pin It

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

INDY Week publishes all kinds of comments, but we don't publish everything.

  • Comments that are not contributing to the conversation will be removed.
  • Comments that include ad hominem attacks will also be removed.
  • Please do not copy and paste the full text of a press release.

Permitted HTML:
  • To create paragraphs in your comment, type <p> at the start of a paragraph and </p> at the end of each paragraph.
  • To create bold text, type <b>bolded text</b> (please note the closing tag, </b>).
  • To create italicized text, type <i>italicized text</i> (please note the closing tag, </i>).
  • Proper web addresses will automatically become links.

Latest in Food



Twitter Activity

Most Recent Comments

Catherine - it isn't journalistic practice to include an entire interview in a reported piece, nor is it an obligation …

by Victoria Bouloubasis on With Berries in Demand, Local Co-ops Won't Budge to Support Driscoll's Boycott (Food)

I believe the response that would cater to "affluent consumer demand" would be to only stock local or non-Driscoll berries …

by Liz 1 on With Berries in Demand, Local Co-ops Won't Budge to Support Driscoll's Boycott (Food)

Victoria, Why didn't you post the whole letter carolyn wrote? You are not reporting the story fairly or unbiastly. Catherine …

by KiKi Manone on With Berries in Demand, Local Co-ops Won't Budge to Support Driscoll's Boycott (Food)

People who are boycotting Driscoll need to see the bigger issue here. The fact that there are labor laws in …

by ProDude on With Berries in Demand, Local Co-ops Won't Budge to Support Driscoll's Boycott (Food)

Sorry I missed this. I worked 13 years part-time in pastry production at NSB and knew Jacqueline then (1985-1998). I …

by Sam Marion on On Tuesday, a Longtime Durhamite Celebrates Twenty Years at Ninth Street Bakery (Food)

Comments

Catherine - it isn't journalistic practice to include an entire interview in a reported piece, nor is it an obligation …

by Victoria Bouloubasis on With Berries in Demand, Local Co-ops Won't Budge to Support Driscoll's Boycott (Food)

I believe the response that would cater to "affluent consumer demand" would be to only stock local or non-Driscoll berries …

by Liz 1 on With Berries in Demand, Local Co-ops Won't Budge to Support Driscoll's Boycott (Food)

© 2016 Indy Week • 201 W. Main St., Suite 101, Durham, NC 27701 • phone 919-286-1972 • fax 919-286-4274
RSS Feeds | Powered by Foundation